Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

27 articles on this Page

Advertising

-----.-.-----BURRY PORT AND…

" -l ull i" i LLANGENNECH.I…

PONTABDAWK

[No title]

FOUNDER OF GORSEINON'S PROSPERITY.

THE BUDGET. MM—

Advertising

LLANDILO CRUELTY CASE.|

-----'-------THE HIGHLAND…

- MAZAWATTEE COCOA. ¡

Advertising

DEATH OF DR. DE WITT TALMAGE.

News
Cite
Share

DEATH OF DR. DE WITT TALMAGE. A VISIT TO SWANSEA. A New York telegram of Saturday says: — Dr. De Witt Talmage, the wen-known Pres- byterian preacher,, has died at Washington. He was 70 years of age. Dr. Talmage was born at Bound Brook. New York, and educated in New York and at the Theological Seminary, New Bruns- wick. In 1856 he was ordalined, and from 1869 to 1894 he was pastor of the Central Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn. Many devo- tional works and volumes of sermons have issued from his pen. He was a preacher of much distinction, and repeatedly visited England, where his congregations were air- ways large. During the civil war he was chaplain of the Pennsylvanian Regiment, and after the war was over he continued his connection with the Army. The building in which he was in the habit of preaching was known as the Brooklyn Tabernacle, and would accommodate nearly 4.000 persons, but it was destroyed by fire in 1872. two years after construction. After a further two years an- other tabernacle had been erected, but this was burnt out in 1890. Dr. Talmage's ser- mons were jpublished simultaneously in nearly 600 periodicals. One thinks of him as the American Spur- geon,. and the parallel becomes more real when we remember the enormous congrega- tions he reaches every week. By voice and TIPn Dr. Talmasre addressed from Sunday to Sunday, it is estimated, an audience of thirtv million peonle. More than three thousand papers printed his sermons every week, and they have appeared weekly for thirty years. Dr. Talmage was probably nearer our own Dr. Parker than Soursreon. He was never tired of pulpit sensations, and of phrases which the newsnaners carried through Amer- ica. He interviewed the Czar in his palace. and brought away an excellent impression of the young ruler of All the Russias, whom he found "all animation, nerfectly natural. and without any assumption of manner," with "kindness and cheer dominant in his make-un." The Czar, saiid Dr. Talmage, is personallv at peace with all the worM—n state of bliss which Dr. Talmage himself did not often realise. He was alwavs at war— if not with the devil., then with Maior Pond. or Tammany, or the politicians, or the anon- ymous corresnondent. Onening a tetter ad- dressed to him in the pulnit. he found a slin of paper with the one word "Fool" upon it. and reading it out to his congregation, he said: "I have known many an instance of a man forgetting to sicrn his name and forget- ting to write the letter." London has seen many strange sights, but some of the stran- pest siphts are never seen at all. One would have given much to see Dr. Talmage sitting on the stens of Westminster Abbey at two o'clock in the morning trving to bargain with Maior Pond as to his salary for preaching. He was due at Nottingham that night, but for hours he walked round and round the Abbey, speaking of the strain his tour was nutting on him. It was the tour of 1879. and the agreement with which the doctor left America was for a hundred lectures for ten thousand dollars, and all exnenses paid for Dr. Talmage and his wife and daughter. But the doctor was overwhelmed by his reception, and appears to have turned the enthusiasm of his admirers to good account. "Wasn't that the most tremendous, overwhelming recention that a minister ever had?" he said to Maior Pond, as thev walked round the sauare, and be added: "This excitement is sroing to use me all up. I can never stand it. How much am I to get out of it?" So they sat until past midnight, and until Big Ben struck two. At the breakfast table next morning the preacher handed the maior a slin of naper on which was written:—"Pay me 200 dollars and mv expenses, not those of my family, and I will go on for one hundred lectures. Put this note in your pocket." The maior put the note ^.n his pocket, and Nottingham heard Dr. Talmage that night. Then followed Birmingham, and after the lecture there Maior Pond received a wire: "Stop everything. To-night surpasses all." Maior Pond did not stou everything. and Dr. Talmage appeared at Manchester the next night. Then he said to Maior Pond: "You have got to pay me 350 dollars a lecture or I go home from here. I cannot stand this succession of ovations!" Somehow matters came right, but how little the people who cheered Dr. Talmage on his way through England imagined that their cheers were costing Maior Pond ten thousand dollars- A couple of years ago Dr. Talmage preached to large congregations at the Swansea Grand Theatre, when he was accompanied by Mrs. Talmage. •

Advertising

- LORD WOLSELEY AS A COLONIAL…

,NEED BE NO APPREHENSION.

[No title]

Advertising

- TALKS ABOUT A TRIP. -

,-RHODES TOMB.

Advertising

Advertising

)——— :THE STATUS OF THE BRITISH…

IUNION LINER ON THE ROCKS.…

THE ROYAL JUBILEE METAL EXCHANGE…

THE LATE DR. RICHARD HUGHES.

Advertising