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-----.-.-----BURRY PORT AND…

" -l ull i" i LLANGENNECH.I…

PONTABDAWK

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FOUNDER OF GORSEINON'S PROSPERITY.

THE BUDGET. MM—

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LLANDILO CRUELTY CASE.|

-----'-------THE HIGHLAND…

- MAZAWATTEE COCOA. ¡

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DEATH OF DR. DE WITT TALMAGE.

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- LORD WOLSELEY AS A COLONIAL…

,NEED BE NO APPREHENSION.

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- TALKS ABOUT A TRIP. -

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TALKS ABOUT A TRIP. [By the REV. PETER HUGHES-GRIFFITHS.] II. +! Now, to go into particulars, we are to pass from summer to winter in three days, or less. Personally, such fast living does not appeal to me, and I was not over-careful to take the swiftest train. Life has now become a fever, and everyone looks and runs, and talks with abbreviation and impatient ges- ture that marks the fever at the crisis. Oh for the day; when the world was young! Methuselah took his time, and the record of his well-night thousand years stands in sacred history to prove that modern life is a Uni4 versal rush to suicide. In those days of happy leisure, the boy could plant an acorn, and when his courage took him to the altar. to be sacrificed to a woman, the oak would come for furniture; he could again, after the disillusionment of married life, plant for his coffin. But times have changed, and we pine for what is not. Getting to High-street Station one crisp, cold day last winter, I found the modern monster waiting with a manifest im- patience, his convincing presence filling the station with vapour that was not incense, and smell that was not perfume, and sound that was not music. I littered the corner of a compartment with rugs, newspapers, time-tables and—myself. We were promised London before seven..—an outrage on Nature. Has the eye, for in- stance, been made to pass objects at this rate? Is not the adjustment demanded "too" rapid ? Let wise men pause and think. Some one has said, with much point, that we do not travel now. we only start and arrive, and I, in my hatred of these Flying Dutchmen (a sentiment which the British Army will understand), confess to a hanker- ling after the grand old coaching days. If it had been possible on that day to enter Wells' perfected time-machine, and transmit oneself to another age, I would have done it. Who knows but we are on the verge of another era, when one may travel, not only in any country, but also in any age? I do not wish tj buoy up old maids with false hopes, but science seems to hover to-day between mys- tery and mysticism, and the bounds of the possible are not yet discovered. In the grand old coaching days the journey to London was a romance. How glorious it was to stvrt from a village, with a blast from the horn. that set the air a-rippling for a mile, to jog along, till the passengers had to descend, to get the wheel out of a rut, or to get pnrs^N out of pockets, because someone from the hillside had taken in his head to make a collection, then to start again lighter, for life was spared and some money, sewn in the lining of the waistcoat, or in the shape of notes in the calf of the stocking, to stop at a quaint village inn, where one was wel- comed in the doorway by the buxom country lass, who never sent her pa to inquire one's intentions, for a little flirting, to quaff the fine old English ale, before brewers had dis- covered the value of tobacco, and redlead, and salt, and other thirst creating ingredients in its manufacture, to sit at a table laden with home products,—bacon that had walked on real English legs, and eggs, not half hatched in the hot hold of some foul trader, but eaten to the music of the hens that laid them, cackling at the door,-to think of this, and then to realise that you were being dragged along by the modern prodigy., indifferent to everythin, at a rate that one must not think of—for that way madness lies, is to descend from the sublime to the ridiculous. The best thing in such journeys is ot to attempt to catch the landscape, but to confine one's attentions to one's neighbours and make them a study. This requires a good deal of training, but it well repays the patient mind. My compartment on this occasion was rather crowded, an old lady in the corner opposite me. two gentlemen along side, and several portmanteaux that pre- cipitated themselves inside just as the train was starting, with a man attached to them. Having arranged these things, placing a huge I one on the rack over the seat,this man walked out into the corridor, leaving the danger to others. After a few upward glances which assured me, I threw the rug over my head and soon dozed away. It is a habit of mine to take a few minutes sleep after the mid-day meal, one escapes so much drowsiness and trouble while indigestion does its work. Now a very strange thing happened, and I relate my experiences in this case, owing to their evid- ent scientific value. Let phychologist in the possession of these data beetiir themselves, Behold, in my sleep I dreamed a dream; all that was. has not remained to me, but the chief features are still indelibly on my mind. I was no longer in the modest haunts of my youthful days, for Fate had borne me far away. On some distant strand I found myself, alone in a realm of utter gloom. The time of the last dissolution seemed to have arrived, for the earth trembled like a living thing. My soul was filled with fear, and I lifted up my eyes in a prayer of despair, only to see a huge overhanging ledge of rock quivering visibly in its outline against the sky. Oh horrors! Another moment, and I saw tbe ledge come off and fall. I jumped up in terror; the train was dashing along but. at my fept, was—the portmanteau—fallen from the rack above. I found this wayward bag had chosen "en route" to graze the nose of one of the gentle- men, to hit the toe of the old lady, and my knee was certainly aching. Circumstantial evidence pointed to the bag. We all agreed that such a heavy thing must have contained samples of lead and copper ore, and that it was a crime to place an object so dangerous above vulnerable humanity. The owner was smoking his Havana in the corridor, and when he came in again and raw his bag he looked around with an injured air, but I explained and made it clear who were the injured party. I added, too, that "pro bono publico" a bag containing samples of lead and copper ore should be placed in the van, or at least under the seat. The man smiled. The old lady made it clear that she had discovered the unpardon- able sin. When the man went on to explain that the bag contained only a few shirts and collars, she wore on her countenance such dis- gust and sourness that it must have "turned" the milk, as thejrain sped by, at every farm for miles around. Soon the train drew up at Paddington, and the rush for various exit> and the cabs made it clear that it was just the time for dinner in London hotels, for man is ever man. and there remains in England no force like that of a prandial vision. If wives paid heed to this simple fact, how they could modify their husband's antics, and by a few mysterious j courses calm tl>em down. There is a way | with all; with husbands it i* this, for they with all; with husbands it i" this, for they are willing an-imals, and never complain of j overloading. Dinner ove r, I bent my way to- wards the London Bridge of the London, Brighton and South Cor.st and Western of France Railways, with divers thoughts on j London, for. though one travels far and wide, London still remains. The world in which we live, like the human body, ha.s but a single heart, and that is London. There have been other cities, and ^ome remain; the very names of which are sacred—Jerusalem, Athens, Rome and Paris, frczn which reli- gions and revolutions and systems have jronei forth, but Locdon 1.0 iueii' the goodness of the past ana the greatness of the present. To know London at all, is to feel, while moving in its boundless congeries, an inrush of a certain eloquence that refuses to be soluble in ink, and baffles the cunning of every magic pen. But we must not remaiin to meditate, or we cease to be of-a-piece with the age in which we live, and I have commenced my aritcle with certain words about the speed of life. In London Bridge Station, I went to the booking office, fumbling in my hand ten glittering coins of gold, for I had studied the time table and knew the ticket I wanted. It was. however., with a grudge that I thought of giving over so much money for mere tran- sit. The clerk, however, took the grudge away, and nearly took my breath as well, for he handed me. not the usual dirty, oblong. badly-pointed bit of cardboard, but a port- folio of little books, printed in many lan- guages, and with pages perforated. Here. at last. was something for one's money, and yet there was a mystery about it all. For long I could not divine the upon me like an apocalypse. All along the route came stiff officials who helped themselves, w<ith oracular air, to these books, appropriating to themselves piece after piece, and page after page, so that the tidy bundle in my pocket, when I left London.. is now scattered over thousands of miles. Now for the meaning: If. after a man had left England, the police found that he w as "wanted," they would, at once, commence a paper-chase, and every time a detective found one of these bits.. he would j wire home that he had discovered a "clue." I may be wrong, there are exceptions to every rule. But it was all clear as day to me, and. though some have argued against this view. my fort remains impregnable. How the wonder grew upon me as I thought of civilisation in its various ramifications! Now we are readv to go abroad. Just can- eel a single night with sleen. and in the morning we are off. Civilisation travels from east to west, and perhaps already we bpve felt a slisrht reversion of tendency, but it is well to show a love for the sacred Dilths along which the tragic procession of life has moved. (Tn be contin n\

,-RHODES TOMB.

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)——— :THE STATUS OF THE BRITISH…

IUNION LINER ON THE ROCKS.…

THE ROYAL JUBILEE METAL EXCHANGE…

THE LATE DR. RICHARD HUGHES.

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