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i !NARROW ESCAPE OF THE |…

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--MR. WILSON BARRETT'S VISIT.

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MR. WILSON BARRETT'S VISIT. RICH TREATS AT THE GRAND THEATRE. This (Friday) and to-morrow (Saturday) evening: Mr. Wilson Barrett will, if we mistake not. find himself confronted, not- withstanding the somewhat oppressive weather, with a dress circle at the Grand Theatre that'should be more in keeping with the first visit to Swansea of the great author- actor than has been the case during the week. Nightly the pit has been packed, and the dress circle fairly well filled, but the grand bazaar at the Albert Halls simply appro- priated, as will be seen from the list of stall- holders, stewards, etc., set out in another part of this issue, the elite of thetown and neighbourhood. However, the bazaar is now over, and the many ladies and gentlemen who lent their much-needed assistance to the function, will find delightful relaxation with Mr. Wilson Barrett, and his really splendid company in Man and his Makers this (Friday) evening, and the "Silver King" (on Saturday eveningi.The week was opened by a production of "Claudian," which was mag- nificently performed. The play, which had never before been to Swansea, has some re- semblance to the more religious themes made famous by Mr. Wilson Barrett—"The Sign of the Cross" and "Quo Vadis but there is a romanticism about "Claudian" that is entirely its own. It is, on the whole, a sad piece, though there are. oecasional bits of humourous by-play. The Eoman Perfect is under a curse of perpetual youth, and be- tween the prologue, in which the curse falls upon him, and the date of the play itself, a hundred years are supposed to elapse. There is nothing he does but which brings ruin in its trail no good action which he would per- form but which works destruction on the heads of those whom he would benefit. At length, he has to die in order that sight and happiness may be restored to "Almida," who among others, had come under his terribie spell. Of the acting of a piece so full of tragic incidents, it is almost superfluous to say anything when one remembers that Mr. Wilson Barrett was in the cast. Though suffering from a cold, he played the title role perfectly, his acting being such that he was several times called before the curtain by the enthusiastic audiences on Mondav and Tuesday evenings. Mr. Wilson Barrett was most ably supported by Miss Lillah McCarthy, who played "Almida" with a sym- pathetic grace and charm that won for her unstinted praise. The villian of the play "Thariogalus" the Tetrarch, was entrusted to the capable hands of Mr. T. Wigney Percyval, while the other characters were aLso splendidly sustained. Miss Cecilia Hilman gave a finely rendered harvest solo in one of the scenes, and the scenery em- ployed was most effective, not to say en- chanting. Wednesday and Thursday even- ings were devoted to the latest play written by Mr. Wilson Barrett, in collaboration with Mr. Louis N. Parker, entitled .'Man and his Makers." It is a problem play of modern life, and the plot turns upon the much dis- cussed question of heredity, the moral being that man has only one Maker, and that what" ever Society may say to the contrary, habits, however bad, can be overcome and conquered by self-will, and self-restraint. Briefly the plot runs thus: Sir Henry Faber, scientist, with a profound belief in the theory of here- dity, refuses to give his daughter, Sylvia, in marriage to John Eadleigh, a barrister, knowing that the vice of taking opiates has wrought ruin to his family for generations past. Radleigh seeks to drown his sorrow by taking powerful drugs. But the woman he loves does not forsake him. He works out his salvation, and proves that man, after all, is master of his own fate. There are some J powerful scenes in the piece and it i» needless ( to state that these were brought out very ) strongly by Mr. Wilson Barrett, Wh9 played I John Radleigh, and the leading ludies, Miss McCarthy, who 1D.éttlê au extremely fascina- tin" Jane fltimplirey.s, and Miss Edyth Lati- niei;, In the more congenial role of Sylvia Fa- J ber. In Act 2, Mr. Wilson Barrett surpassed himself oil Wednesday night, and was ap- plauded to the echo when the curtain was rung down, only to be raised again and again. Perhaps in this part of the play he made it more evident, than at any other time, that "Man and his Makers" would not be half so acceptable, if, indeed, it would not entirely fail, with the part of John Rad- leigh entrusted to less capable hands. The same remark may be applied to some of the incidents in regard to the playing of the leading ladies. Miss McCarthy's interpreta- tion of these was truly magnificent. while one cannot speak too highly of Miss Lati- mer's presentation of the part of the devoted lover. "Man and his Makers," as stated, will be repeated this (Friday) evening and the opportunity of seeing it should not be missed. Mr. Wilson Barrett takes the role, which he created, of Wilfred Denver, in "The Silver King" on Saturday evening. Next week "Somebody's Sweetheart" will occupy the boards.

--THE MUMBLES ROAD.

THE HEATHER BELL.

-I SWANSEA BOARD OF 1 GUARDIANS,

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--n_-------;. LADY LLEWELYN.

---------.--A LANDMARK ALREADY.!

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L FASHION NOTES. 1

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NEATH AND DISTRICTI -

FIRE.'

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I I ..,===== I / PRESENTATION…

A HALF-PINT LEMON JELLY :...FREE.

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--I RAILWAY RETURNS. I RHONDDA…

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Family Notices

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WAR IN SOUTH AFRICA.

GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY TEMPERANCE…

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MILITARY TA t TOO AT CARDIFF.¡