Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

24 articles on this Page

VsEMls.SiCE ON EVER1TT AND…

Advertising

, MISS LANGDON'S FA±\TCY DKESS…

GLASGOW AND BRISTOL CHANNEL…

A LANDMARK ALREADY.I

[No title]

- "MY FRIEND THE PRINCE."

LLANGYFELAOH DISTRICT COUNCIL.

Advertising

ANECDOTE OF AGASSIZ.

News
Cite
Share

ANECDOTE OF AGASSIZ. Agassiz was a very famous naturalist. Wher he was a boy his father was quite impatient at his son's devotion to frogs, snakes, and fishes, for he wanted Louis to be a merchant. But tlit boy would spend his vacations travelling ot foot through Europe, and carefully examining every species of natural history he could find Wc are told that when Agassiz reached London, where there was to be a meeting of the Roya Society, and having a letter of introduction ti one of the members, he was permitted to b« present. The gentleman said I have a younj friend here from Switzerland who thinks ht knows something about fishes; how much J have a fancy to try. There is, under this cloth, perfect skeleton of a fish which existed long before man." After describing it still further, he said to Agassiz: "Can you sketch for me or the blackboard your idea of this fish ? The bo, took the chalk and drew an outline of th" fish, correct in every bone. The grave old lÍoctOrt burst into loud applause, and Agassiz sa.i/. it waf the proudest moment of his life. x CLEVER PURPOSE IN ANIMALS. An amusing incident, which shews that anlmali are subject to feelings very like those which occasionally ruffle the bosoms of men, occurred lome little time ago at the Jardin des Plantes in Paris. A large elephant, formerly the centre of attraction, found it3elf supplanted in public favour by a new arrival-a young camel. The camel was the latest acquisition and very naturally engaged the attention of visitors. The elephant for a long time shewed signs of dissatisfaction, and at last his jealousy reached a point where it must find expression. When the usual crowd gathered about the camel the elephant prepared for action. It filled its trunk with water and, with deliberate aim. discharged the water all o\ er the people who stood looking at the baby camel. This method of throwing cold water upon thf admirers of a rival brought a laugh even from its victims. Equally wise in making its calculations was 4 cat that chose a peculiar spot for a bed. Comfort was the cat's object, and the chosen dpot did not seem to be calculated to afford it. The cat was found fast asleep in a large ship- building yard, lying on what seemed to be a very muddy path. It was found, however, that the spot chosen by the cat for its couch was the point at which a hot steam-pipe passed under the road, so that the mud was baked into a warm dry clay, which made not only a clean but an artificially heated sleeping-place. A BOY'S COMPOSITION. Water is found everywhere, especially when it rains, as it did the other day, when our cellar was half full. Jane had to wear her father's rubber boots to get the onions for dinner. Onions make your eyes water, and so does horseradish, when you eat too much. There is a good many kinds of water in the world—rain- water, soda-water, holy-water and brine. Water is used for a good many things. Sailors use it to go to sea on. If there wasn't any ocean the ships couldn't float and they would have to stay ashore. Water is a good thing to fire at boys with a squirt and to catch Ash in. My father caught a big one the other day, and when he hauled it up it was an eel! Nobody could be saved from drowning if there wasn't any water to pull them out of. Water is first-rate to put fires out with. I love to go to fires and see the men work at the engines. This is all I can think of about water-except the flood. TRUE STORY OF A MOUSE. That mice are cunning is known, but not so generally known is the fact that they may on occasions become as persevering as the ant. The following story illustrates the truth of this: "While some labourers were digging hoi s for telegraph poles' a mouse fell into one of the excavations, which was four and a half feet deep and twenty inches across. The first day he ran around the bottom of the hole, trying to find some ipeans of escape, but could not climb out. The next day he settled down to business. He began steadily and systematically to dig a spiral groove round and round the inner surface of the hole with a uniformly ascending grade. lIe worked night and day, and as he got further from the bottom he dug little pockets where he could either lie or sit and rest. Interested witnesses threw in food. At the end of two weeks the mouse struck a stone. This puzzled him. For nearly a day he tried to get under, around, or over the obstruc- tion, but without success. With unflinching patience he reversed his spiral, and went on tunneling his way in the opposite direction. At the end of four weeks he reached the top, and probably sped away to enjoy his well-earned freedom. His escape was not seen."

Advertising

b'ASHION NOTES. I

THE PLACE OF SONG IN KELIGIOUS…

Advertising

NOTES BY WATCHMAN.

NEATH BOROUGH POLICE COURT.

[No title]

CRICKET FIXTURES.

LOCAL FIXTURES OF FORTHCOMING…

! SALES BY AUCTION.

Advertising

Family Notices

Advertising

STfANSEA SCNDAY SCHOOL UNION.