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THE DANES AND SOUTH WALES,…

SUICIDE AT COCKETT-

CHRISTMASTIDE IN SWANSEA &…

SWANSEA'S AGED POOR.

GRAND THEATRE, SWANSEA

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-----I LLANRHIDIAN LOWER,…

WELSH (!) PLACE NAMES.

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WELSH (!) PLACE NAMES. A REPLY TO MR. EDWARD ROBERTS. TO THE EDITOR OF "THE CAMBRIAN." SiB.—In your issue of the 14th inst., Mr. E. Roberts would almost give one the impression that the word "Coniger," in Wales, was simply an Englishman's mis-pronoirneiation of a purely Welsh Cwning-Gaer," whereas this Wel-h is nothing more than a Cymro's adiptation of an old English word. There can be little doubt that the English "Cbney and the Welsh "Cwnincr are derived from the Latin Cuniculus "-a rabbit, but that the terminative Gare" or "Ger," so common to the United Kingdom, is really the Welsh Gaer"-a fortress, is open to doubt, although it may equate its elf therewith The following references may also be of interest to Mr. Roberts' correspondent" j Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Pro- vincial words.—" Conygarthe "—a rabitt warren (Palsgrave). Mayhew and Skeat's Concise Dictionary of Middle English.—Conyngere "—a rabbit warren. Skeat's Etymological Dictionary of the En- glish language.—" Cony-Coney," middle English Coni-Conyning ie most likely an English word derived from the Latin through old French. Kelham's Dictionary of old French.—"Co-)igg ^Coney ground. ° Whitley Stokes'.—Old Irish glosses (O'Davoran) gives the word CuinRegar," and Joyce's Irish place names, vol. 1.. f. 481, says, that the Irish word for a rabbit is "Coinen" (" Cunneen "), and that a rabbit warren is "Corneas" ("Canniekere"), which occurs in 8.11 parts of Ireland. Galway has "Conicar." Limcrick-" Conigar." Kerry-" Connigar and Coimigare." Waterford-" Cnnnigar." Whilst "Lisgunnion" in Monaghan means the fort of the- rabbits, Jamieson's Etymological Dictionary of the Scotch language has a long article on the terminative "Gare-Gaire," "Garth and "Yare,' and speaks of the Scotch" Conniggaire," aud Swedish "Kanninggaerd," as enolosurea for rabbits, with a special reference to the Su-Goth Gaerd, "as meaning-the keeping or protecting by a fence. He also quotes Acts of James III. and James I., in reference to "Cunningaires" and "Cunuyngarthes." He adds: "the Gaelic Cunigcear, id., seems to be aB imported word." Promptorum Parvnlorum has Connyngere or "Conynge Erthe = Cunnicularum," and explains" Erthe" as-" Erye," and gives" Ere =to plough, continuing :—" Among the privy ur.se expenses of Henry VII., 1493, is a payment for making of the Conyngerthe pate. Horman observea that Warrens' and Conygcrs and parkes and palydde ocoupie mock gronnde not inhabitauut. In almost every county in England, near to ancient dwellings, the aarne Coneygare-Gonigree' or Coney-Garth' occurs." It will be noted that this latter extract gives a possible equation of the terminative, with a shortened Erthe." I have some recollection that this word "Coniger" was thrashed out in Notes and Queries three or four years ago, but have not time to refer to back numbers. ALEX. G. MOFFAT.

jLOCAL WEDDINGS.

RHONDDA AND SWANSEA BAY RAILWAY.

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LANDORE AND DISTRICT JUNIOR…

VARTEG COLLIERY COMPANY LTD

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SWANSEA HOSPITAL.

SWAXSEA g^MNEE^ND JIBRBAL

LOVE'S COMPANION.