Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

25 articles on this Page

LATEST NOVELTIES AT BEN EVANS…

[No title]

THE FATE OF MAFEKING.

RELIGIOUS FREEDOM,

. SUNDAY TRADING AT SWANSEA.

-♦-MONMOUTHSHIRE SUNDAY ,CLOSING…

MISS LANGDON'S FANCY DRESS…

MISS MAUDE MARSHALLSAY'S CONCERT.…

THE TRADE OF THE PORT AND…

BOARD OF TRADE INQUIRY AT…

[No title]

IMPORTANT PROPERTY SALES AT…

THE HERO OF MAFEKING.

LLANDILOI

[ WESLEYAN SYNOD AT | SWANSEA.

MUMBLES.

AMMANFORD. ;

Advertising

! LOCAL FIXTURES OF FORTHCOMING…

LOCAL NEWS.

,— LLANDEBIE.

[No title]

I NEATH

[No title]

NOTES & NOTIONS.

News
Cite
Share

L- of some seven thousand is still reported on -the South-East. If Buller could have nego- tiated the Drakensberg mountains, this force knight have been caught or dispersed. It looks more or less easy on paper, but the Drakensberg range is a natural fortress which hundreds can hold against thousands. The Biggarsberg passes have happily been taken. They are less formidable, and being situated, not on the frontier of our territory, but well Within Northern Natal, their capture could -only indirectly assist an advance through the Drakensberg into the Orange State. No doubt, however, Buller is making for the "Transvaal, and is co-operating now, though a long way off, with Roberts. In that case, some of the hardest fighting of the war lies before him, unless the Boer forces which he might expect to meet are largely depleted by the call to defend Pretoria. Proceeding north, he may ere long pass Majuba Hill. It is a iittlo difficult to realise that the historic disaster involved the fate of only about half battalion; and had a fourth of Buller's pre- eent force been then employed, the war of 1881 would probably have been the last be- tween whites in South Africa. The aspect which the campaign has come to assume affords justification for the removal of restraint in the discussion of the question of settlement. Lord Salisbury had already informed the world that the independence of the Republics must cease. Except as to this general principle, the first official intimation of the Cabinet's decision was made by Mr. •Chamberlain on Friday, to an audience which, needless to say. greeted it with enthusiasm. Heading it, Messrs. Kruger and Steyn will find themselves bereft of whatever hope may have lingered as to a weakening of the "never again" policy. The territories to whiclfc autonomy was granted under political condi- tions that have been violated, must and «hall be fully incorporated in her Majesty s dominions." Those dofinito, uncompromising words have been delayed, as some think, un- duly. We do not think so. While the etruggle was obstinate and bitter, good sense demanded a certain reticence as to the future. however assured the result. The collapse of the organised Boer resistance in the field is now seen to be a matter of weeks, and though possibly Pretoria itself may be held for some time, the end becomes not merely assured, hut obvious. The Queen's troop may invest Pretoria, occupy Johannesburg, control the railway to Delagoa Bay, and commence the work of rehabitation of the large and loyal population that will no longer be known as Outlanders. For an indefinite time, the Colonial Secretary announces—and the in- evitable hardly needs the formal intimation —the administration of each of the "States must be that of a Crown Colony. Probably 88 many as fifty thousand troops will be main- tained in South Africa for five years, and possibly twenty thousand for a further de- eade The problem of the war must bring another in its train, but whereas the solution of the one means suffering and death, the answer to the other will be found in the fuller and nobler life which is the glad heri- tage of every people absorbed into the Empire.