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JfOVEL SHIP IN SWANSEA.

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JfOVEL SHIP IN SWANSEA. INTERVIEW WITH THE CAPTAIN. INTERESTING FACTS. Durin, this week the North Dock has been in- waded by a large number of people, all intent spon Meinl." with their own eyes," the latest novelty in ships, which was reported to have ..Arrived on Saturday. The e.s. "Segamore" is, indeed a novelty in WtMine construction. It is known in the shipping «rotld as the whaleback steamer. There are not very lDaDY of this kind of boats •float; there are a number trading in American WtteM, but the shipowners on this side of the Atlantic don't appear to have taken very kindly to the type, in fact, the Segamore is the only one that has been seen at any port in England. Yet, when the designer of the whaleback steamer Meceeded in having hie plans worked out in a practical form about seven or eight years ago, the type was expected to revolutionise the ordin- ary style of steamer construction. The extraor- .4íury feature about a whaleback steamer is that 4ihe has no deck or bulwarks, like an ordinary vessel. When she has been loaded and the batches seearely fastened down, she presents the appearance above the water of a whale's back. and it is for this reason that the nanM whale- 1JAok" bMl been given her. It should be stated that this description does not apply to the crew's quarters and engine-room, Ac., all of which are Aft of the ship. The quarters of the crew-who somber 24 all told-are nncommonly clean and comfortable. The cabins are eight feet in height, which is a good deal higher than is the rule on other vessels. The engineers' rooms communi- cate with the engine-room, which is a very great -convenience to them. The columns which sup- port the rooma also act as ventilators, of which there are altogether 48. Under these healthy ecudilkms, the members of the crew rarely suffer iU-bealth, even when Bailing in hot climates. -There are seven turrets on deck, four of which AM. meed as feeders,two as engine-room and stock. jtold. ftpd the. other is used for the windlass and for handling the anchors. When the « Segamore" is at sea the waves wash over her, on account of her lying rather low. The "Segamore" sails under the Belgian flag, tmt is owned by Johnston, of Liverpool. Her f;regi £ tered tonnage is 1,379, and she carries 3,500 tone, including bunkers. One of our representatives was taken round on visit of inspection by Capt. Voss (the genial and conrteouf master of the Segamore") on Wednes. day afternoon. In the course of conversation, he told the Pressman that the steamer was built by Meeera Doxford and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, in lfl93. From the time she started running until the commencement of the Spanish-American war, about three years ago the "Segamore traded between Baltimore and Daiquiries in Cuba. At the latter port, they usually took from three to four hours to load with ore, on account of their fcavine to put more into the mam hold than the .other, so as to render the ship seaworthy. How- over for the first ten minutes it was plain sailing, so to speak, and 1,000 tons of ore used to be shipped in the short space of ten minutes. Lest those of our readers who are of a eceptical frame of mind may shy at this state- jmeut it should be explained that at Daiqmries there is a very high pier, which was built at a cost of 4,000 dollars, and from this pier there was lowered into the hold of the ship four shoots, down which the ore went like ram. It usually took 30 hours to discharge at Baltimore, which they did with their o vn appliances—ten derricks for lifting up the cargo, five winches, and two w&m capstans. For the last two years the steamer had been carrying iron and coal up the Black Sea. What sort of a sea-boat is she ? queried the iI<Iribe. A very good one. We used to steam 10 to 10$knots a hour, but we only go 9 now, on Account of reduced consumption of coal. There is a double bottom to the ship. and it can fill in 31,250 ton" of water ballast if required. She Weathers a gale splendidly, and, unlike other steamers, never trembles at all. We have never had an accident worth speaking of, nor, by-the- way, have we lost a man overboard at sea. Speaking of accidents, we once entered Antwerp in a gale, and the surveyor came on board and asked what damage I had sustained. I told him I hadn't had any damage, and he was suprised. because he said all the steamers were coming in iu a more or less damaged condition." How is it that the ship-owners on this side of the Atlantic have not taken to this type of ship, seeing the advantage it has over other steamers ?" I cannot say, unless it is because we are not able to carry deck cargo, owing to the wav?s washing over us. There are about 80 of these boats in America--two goin? to sea under the Stars and Stripes, aud all the others sailing on the rivers." The" Segamore" is taking in a carge of 3,000 tons of Graigola patent fuel for Constantinople, and 500 tons of bunker coal. The local agents are Messrs. T. P. Richards, TurpinandCo.

DEATH OF MR. GORDON ANDREWS.

OTTAWA FIRE FUND.

SWANSEA CORONERSHIP.

THE CANINE DEFENCE LEAGUE.

THE TRADE OF THE PORT AND…

TRADE DURING THE MONTH OF…

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THE PRICE OF COAL.

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THE WAR IN SOUTH AFRICA,

RED CROSS FUND,

THE GRAND THEATRE.

BAND OF HOPE DEMONSTRATION.

Advertising

I SALES BY AUCTION.

------LOCAL FIXTURES OF FORTHCOMING…

LOCAL NEWS.

THE SWANSEA HOSPITAL.

--------SPRING AILMENTS.

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"RELIGIOUS FREE THOUGHT."

TO THE EDITOR OF "THE CAXBRIJTN."

TO THE EDITOR OF " THE CAMBRIAN."

TO THE EDITOR OF "THE CAMBRIAN."

ISWANSEA BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

NOTES & NOTIONS.