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MANAGEMENT OF SWANSEA MARKET.

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NOTES & NOTIONS.

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NOTES & NOTIONS. Single is each man born into the world single he dies; single he receives the reward of his good deeds, and single the punishment of his evil deeds. When he dies his body lies like a fallen tree upon the earth, but his virtue accompanies his soul. Wherefore let man harvest and garner, so that he may have an inseparable companion in traversing that gloom ichich is so hard to be traversed.— MANC THE LAWGIVER. BADEN-POWELL.. One word of this weary war All our hearts are waiting for, Of the hero, England bore, Kind and gay: The soul so calm whate'er befalls it For no peril yet appals it. And his priceless toil, he calls it Holiday. Half an endless j ear ago, He was left amidst the foe, With some thousand men or so, As their chief. For his country's arms miscarried, And across the desert arid Many a tedious noonday tarried The relief. But he knew his masters well; And Eot fortune, nor Pall-mall, That is paven. smooth as Hell, No man's word Trusted he, but God who made him, And his own good sword, to aid him; And the soldiers that obeyed him Like his sword. EDWARD SYDNEY TYLEE. —" Spectator." • Sir John Llewelyn's banquet to the mem- bers of the Swansea Football Club, in recog- nition of the championship won by the first fifteen under Mr. Bancroft's capable cap- taincy, was a great success. A most recherche menu was provided, and nothing was stinted even in the best of wines. Sir John made an ideal chairman, and he delivered a highly interesting and instructive speech, whicn was listened to with deep attention. The worthy Baronet of Penllergaer is a 1 A. X_1 _1 Keen. Bporvainaii: lie taxrb. a able interest in the doings of the All Whites," and he attends at the St. Helen's Field at every opportunity. To entertain the victorious footballers at so sumptuous a banquet was a thoughtful and generous act, and it has further cemented, if possible, the good relations between Sir John and the members and friends of the Swansea Football and Cricket Club in particular, and all interested in sport in general. Mr. T. R. W. Mason is a candidate for the I vacancy on the Harbour Trust, caused by the lamented death of Mr. Albert Mason. He was a candidate at the last ordinary election, when Mr. George E. Cook, Mr. Graham Vivian, Mr. Roger Beck and the late Mr. Mason were returned. Mr. T. R. W. Mason has been intimately acquainted with the trade of the port for nearly thirty years, he is tho head of an important firm, and he possesses pronouncedly progressive views. Mr. W. Weaver, of the important firm of Messrs. Weaver and Co., is also a candidate, and there is a strong feeling at the docks in his favour. www We have reason to believe that Mr. C. H. Glascodine, barrister-at-law, and deputy Clerk of Arraigns, will succeed Col. Morgan as President of the Royal Institution of South Wales. The annual meeting will be held some time this month. There would be a very special fitnew in the election of Mr. C. H. Glascodine. He is a member of one of the oldest and most respected Swansea families, and his life has been devoted to the study of the arts and sciences which it is the mission of the Royal Institution to popularise. The Institution has done really excellent work. It has bten the means of spreading the in- fluence of culture in our midst during the last half century, and to-day, despite the many state-aided institutions that have sprung up, it is as useful as ever. The R.I.S.W. was established by the most dis- tinguishel body of gentlemen our town ever gave birth to. One of them was the late Sir W. R. Grove, the discoverer of the Correla- tion of the Physical Forces. A faithful servant at the Institution is Mr. Evan Lewis, who has been Curator for over thirty years. www The many friends of Mr. A. Thomas, B.A. (Oxon) and of University Hospital, London, will be pleased to learn that a fortnight ago I he won a gold medal at the hospital in open competition in medicine, as well as a prize of B25 in medical books and instruments. Mr. Thomas is a son of Mrs. John Thomas, Duke- street, Morriston. WWW At the banquet given last week to Mr. Marchant Williams at the Hotel Cecil, London, in honour of his appointment as Stipendiary of Merthyr and Aberdare, "he following local gentlemen were present: — Sir J. T. D. Llewelyn, Bart., M.P., Sir Lewis Morris, J.D.D.L. (Carmarthen), Messrs. D. Brynmor Jones, Q.C., Mr. William Williams, Macsygwernen Hall; T. Williams, junior, ditto; W. Llewelyn Williams. Among those who were unable to be present, and who sent congratulatory letters were the Duke of Devonshire, K.G., Mr. A. J. Balfour, M.P., Sir J. J. Jenkins, M.P., and Mr. Bowen Row- lands (Recorder of Swansea). Lord Justice Vaughan-Williams presided, and he propose the health of the guest, who, in responding, said that his new duties would not eever his connection with Wales, but that he would do so much in the future as in the past. • • t At the International College of Music (Swansea Centre) the following pupils were successful: -Florence Parnell, of Port Teu- nant-road, passed in the Intermediate Divi- sion; Stanley Terry Owen, Cromwell-street, Mount Pleasant, and Fay Stacey, 2, Farm- lane, St. Thomas, passed in the Junior Divi- sion, with full marks (100); and Alice Phil- pin, of Middleton-street, passed in a credit- able manner. WWW The report of the Swansea Women's Liberal Association for 1899 has been issued. The President is Mrs. M. B. Williams Acting Vice-President, Mrs. Freeman Vice-Presidents, Mrs. Edith Reid and Mrs. Travers Wood Hon. Treasurer. Mrs. Edith Reid Hon. Financial Secretary, Mrs. Wiu. Davies Hon. Secretary, Miss Lallie G. Davies. The committee is composed of Miss Brock, Mrs. Cleeves, Mrs. Sydney G. Davies, Mrs. Rachel Griffiths, Mrs. Rebecca Harris, Mrs. Lilian A. Knight, Mrs. Lewis Lewis, Mrs. Meyler, Mrs. Morris, Mrs. Norton, Mrs. Noah Owen, Mrs. C. H. Perkins, Miss Prust, Mrs. W. H. Paton, Miss Rodnell, Mrs. S. E. Smith, Mrs. Salmon, Mrs. Seyler, Mrs. Lleufer Thcmas, Mrs. S. P. Wills, and Mrs. Emily Williams. Tha objects of the Associa- tion shall be to promote Liberal principles, to secure Parliamentary Franchise for Women, to diffuse knowledge on political questions of general and local interest among the Women of Swansea." The members also H desire to ure our ?nfluenc5 to promote Temperanca, Truth and Morality in our re- presentatives, Repression of Bribery and In- timidation, Absolute religicus equality, and Equal Justice for all, rich and poor, men and women." Who shall say that women are cot ambitious and zealous after this ? w < And what does the secretary, in her report, say ? That the year, which has been so gloomy in the political world, has been marked in y°ur Association by increased activity." Then we are told the nature of the increased activity. Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. Emily Williams, Mrs. Mayne and Mrs. Harvey wore chosen as delegates to represent the Association at the Liberal Federation meetings in London in May last year. During the winter various entertainments were held at the Shaftesbury Hall. On October 20 a most enjoyable musical and dramatic pro- gramme was carried out by Mr. and Mrs. Cleeves and friends, amongst whom were Mrs. Seyler and Miss Olive Madge, and Messrs. A. Thomas Henderson and Cleeves." On December 11th Mrs. Lleufer Thomas gave a most interesting and instructive address on. Some Impressions of South Africa,' a subject peculiarly attractive at the present crisis in the history of your coun- try." At this mesting. too, Miss Brock re- cited the Absent-Minded Beggar," and 14s. 6d. was collected for the Mayor's War Fund. Other meetings were held, and the cecretary concludes her report thus: — A very great effort has been made to make the meetings of your Association frequent and interesting, but tho Secretary feels that her effoits have not been sufficiently seconded by individual members, and the attendance has not been so good as she had hoped to see. She trusts, however, that the next session may see a marked improvement in this re- spect, and that the members may shew, by thoir presence, that their interest in the life of their Association is real and earnest." The vacancies on the Committee, caused by tho resignation of Mrs. Thomas Jones and Mrs. Samuel Owen, were filled by the electioa of their Association is real and earnest." The vacancies on the Committee, caused by the resignation of Mrs. Thomas Jones and Mrs. Samuel Owen, were filled by the electioa of Mrs. Lleufer Thomas and Mrs. Emma Jones. The tragic death of Mr. Geo. Sims, divi- sional traffic manager of the Great Western Raitway from Bridgend to Milford, came as a painful shock to South and West Walians. He was a most estimable gentleman, and won the confidence of all with whom he came in contact. He filled an important position with much tact and ability, and he was held in high esteem at Paddington. Appointments have the same influence upon the members of the Swansea Corpora- tion that a magnet has upon a needle. They attract. A meeting of the Works and Sani- tary Committee was held on Tuesday, when the appointment of a meat and veterinary inspector "as discussed. The attendance of members was unusually large, but alas! the question was postponed till Monday. Then we may expect another great gathering. This straining after gnats and swa; towing camels is very pitiable. It is a serious re- flection on the civic patriotism and indepen- dc-ncc of the Corporation. Members frequent- ly haggle long and earnestly about pennies. They are indifferent, silent, or conspicuous by their absence, when pounds are at stake. When will an improvement set in? # # # The annual meeting of the Cwmdonkin Shelter will be held on Monday, May 21st. This institution is doing excellent work, thanks to the largeness of heart and zeal of Mrs. Ebenezer Davies. It is to be hoped there will be a large attendance at the annual meeting, for the Shelter deserves generous support. It supplies a keenly-felt want. • • • Master D. J. Thomas, the boy-vocalist, is becoming quite a favourite. He has an ex- cellent tenor voice, a good manner, and he sings with intelligence. But we fear he is being spoiled. He is too young and his voice too good that he should be allowed to appear in public so often. The boy deserves to be saved from his friends. w«w Miss Maggie Jones is not only an accom- plished musician, a sweet singer, and a capable teacher, but she is a ruler and leader of children. Few could have trained and controlled the children at last week's charity and patriotic concert as she did. It was a great success in every way, and the little ones are as proud of the fact as the teacher. Uncle Robin," who has nearly a thousand nephews and nieces—members of the Dicky Bird Society—offered a handsome prize for the best report of tho concert. Out of a large number Uncle Robin" has chosen four of the competitions, which will be found in our Children's Column. The prize is awarded to Miss Catherine Walters, aged 13. but consolation prizes will be given to Miss Kate Williams, aged 15; Miss Emily Watkins, aged 13, and Miss Florrie Thomas, aged 13. 0 WWW The 40th annual prize meeting of the I Glamorganshire Rifle Volunteer Association will be held at Mariram Park on Tnesdav. 5th June, and two following days. A Capital programme has been drawn up, and there should be some very good contests. The prize-givers include the Marquesa of Bute, Miss Talbot, Messrs. R. B. and Sidney Byass and Co., Lord Windsor, Mr. Gregory and the Association. The Talbot" memorial prize, JE:120, and the champion silver medal of the Association, Lord Windsor's grand aggregate prizes, JS55, and bronze medals of the National Rifle Association, etc., will, we have no doubt, be spiritedly competed for. The Com- mittee of the Association consists of Lord Windsor, Major Bell, Lieut. Ivor Bowen, Capt. Coath, Private G. Game, Major Dowdes- well, Major J. J. David, Lieut. Evan Daviee, Lieut. Harris, Private W. H. Hinton, Capt. Knox, Lieut. G. Knott, Lieut. Hunter, Major Langdon, Capt. McGaul, Quarter-Master Sergt. Perkins, Sergt. J. T. Starkey, Lieut.- Col. Trick, Lieut. 1. G. Thomas, Major Bruce Vaughan, Capt. the Hon. Odo Vivian, Capt. H. C. Vivian, Sergt. Thomas Williams, and Sergt. J. Tacker Williams. w w < The Committee of the Glamorganshire Rifle Volunteer Association state in the annual report that it is a matter of great satisfaction to be able to report that the affairs of the Association are altogether in a far more satisfactory state than they were last year." During last autumn strenuous efforts were made to place the object for unfortunate financial position, before th-j which the Association was started, and its county generally, and most of the leading residents were communicated with by the secretary. The appeal was not made in vain. The best thanks of the Committee have been accorded to our secretary, Lieut. George Knott, for the eminent services rendered by him during the past year, also to Major Bruce Vaughan, 3rd V.B. Welsh Regiment, Cardiff, for the generous manner in which he has so successfully worked in the interests of the Association. Col. Trick has again been good enough to consent to place his revolver targets at the service of the Association during the prize meeting in June." w < w 1 The trade of Swansea harbour continues to improve. Hardly a month passes by with- out the Trustees receiving fresh evidence of the necessity of a dock capable of accomodat- ing the largest vessels afloat or on the stocks. And it is quite in consonance with the spirited policy pursued of late to find the Trustees determined to spare no effort to provide such a dock at the earliest oppor- tunity. As we have before stated, there is every probability of a Bill being promoted in Parliament in the spring of 1901. The officials are even now busily preparing details, etc., and, of course, the bulk of the work falls upon Mr. Schenk and his department. Mr. Griffith Thomas, the chairman, has his heart in the scheme; he has kept it well before the public eye, and he has on every occasion sought to show how necessary it is to Swan- sea's future. A nation's docks are the con- duits through which the trade of the country passes. Once let the pipe at this or that port get in bad order, become too narrow for the traffic, or too expensive in the use, and the flowing trade will inevitably dwindle and decline; it will find its way to ports at which it meets with no obstruction. To haug back in the matter of dredging of the navigable channel, to allow the dock facilities to drop behind, is to impede the flow of trade. Con- versely, to spend freely, or even lavishly, on the approaches to the docks, to bring old docks up to date, generally to increase the accommodation for shipping, and to provide sheds and cranes equal to the needs of modern vessels, is to reap a certain reward in the patronage given to the port. Swansea H now reaping that reward, but we have arrived at a stage when it becomes our bounden duty to provide for the large vessels that are being built every year. And none recognise this *act more than Mr. Griffith Thomas, Mr. Law, Mr. Schenk and the others, in whose hands are placed the interests of the harbour. The rr.ammoth Great* Eastern," forty years ago a wonder of the world, if she were afloat to-day would be but a large ship amongst other huge ships. Her size has been reached by steady growth, and in a year or two will bo surpassed, without much notice of the fact. The new ships and the navigable channels confront one another. Are you going to get any deeper to allow of our growth ?" say the ships; or must we go to another port?" Similarly they say to the docks. Your sheds and your cranes, which may have been good enough for the cargoes carried a quarter of a century ago, are now altogether behind the timos; are you going to supply up-to-date sheds and cranes, or muat we go to some other port?" These are questions which are being put silently to every port, and every one answers in its own way-with a point of the finger at the figure- spotted chart of the entrance or river, showing a steady and progressive deepening of the channel; a wave of the hand at new dock works, at double-storey sheds and rows of waiting cranes; or, on the other hand, with a despondent shake of the head or shrug of the shoulders. The fact is, that it is only in recent times that ports and docks have opened their eyes to the increasing demands of shipping; they have more or less been taken by surprise, and in all directions there is to be observed a feverish desire to atone for past neglect. It is because of this fever- ish anxiety that it behoves Swansea to be on the qui rive, and not to lag a minute behind the times. As the Harbour Trustees are alive to their responsibilities, we need look to the future with every confidence. < < A few seasons ago the children at the Home for Orphan and Friendless Girls were taken to Mumbles for a month. A beautifully- situated house between Langland and New- ton was kindly placed at their disposal. The girls enjoyed the change, and it did them much good. They are now wondering whether a similar treat is in store for them this season. If any lady or gentleman is desirous of helping our orphan girls in this way, they should communicate as early as possible with Miss Walliker, the Matron, o. Mr. Isaac Gale, High-street. The children do no harm to the houses they occupy. A local gentleman recently wrote Miss Walliker, my experience is that instead of doing the promises any harm they do them a great deal of good; they (the children) are so scrupulous- ly clean and careful, and I consider it a favour confeired to let the children occupy one." • • favour confeired to let the children occupy one." Llandilo is doing nobly in the cause of Tommy Atkins. It has not only supplied a goodly nmber of volunteers, but has sub- scribed generously to the patriotic funds, Lord Dynevor and Col. J. Crow Richardson being very conspicuous. Thus is Llandilo sustaining its military and philanthropic traditiom. In the days of old, when the bulk of the landed property in South Wales be- longed to the Dynevor family, it is said that —-—— the heads of this family between them could raise no fewer than 40,000 men for the field. It was Sir Rhys ap Thomas, a scion of the house of Dynevor, too, who dealt the mortal stroke to Richard III. on the field of Bos- worth, and he, more than any other man, was instrumental in rendering possible the acces- sion of Henry Tudor to the English Throne. We are face to face with a serious crisis in the tinplate trade of South Wales. A general strike is threatened, aLd just at present there EeelUS little promise of it being averted. The c men seem as determined as the masters, and all tho discussions and negotiations of the past month or so resulted in a deadlock on Tuesday. It may be remembered that origin- ally the men demanded an advance of 15 per cent., but subsequently they expressed their willingness to accept a 5 per cent, increase. The employers refused to grant this, and offered a 2j per cent, increase. As the result, a strike is threatened. The men, it appears, base their claims on the following grounds: —(1) The present abnormally high market price of tinplates; (2) The operatives, having suffered reductions in bad times, are now en- titled to participate in the advantages of good times; (3) The steelworkers in South Wales did not suffer so much during the late de- pression of labour at the tin mills, and yet have received an advance in wages of 17! per cent., and (4) There is no important industry in this country but its labour has participa- ted in the benefits of the trade revival. The case for the employers is summed up in the statement that for the advances in the cost of raw materials, particularly tin and steel, no adequate advance in the selling price of tinplates has been obtainable, and this cir- cumstance precludes any large increase in wages at the present time. During the past nine months there has been an increase in the cost of raw materials of from 50 to 100 per cent., and steel, which in June last might ha/ve been bought at E4 10s. per ton, is now quoted at 97 5s. At the present price of raw materials tinplates, the makers contend, are not produced at a profit. It is difficult for the layman to thoroughly grasp the situation, but it is generally hoped a solution of th* difficulty will bo arrived at, and a strike averted. The annual banquet of the Swansea and Neath Incorporated Law Society, on Juna 30th, promises to be a great success. A large and important gathering is anticipated. Mr. Justice Grantham, who will preside over the Swansea Summer Assizes, and the Lord Chief Justice will be proeent. w t The discussion at Wednesday's meeting of the General Purposes Committor Was most unseemly. Petty personalities, Duerile wrang- ling and contemptuous smiles and sneers marked almost every speech. And Mr. Tutton was the worst offender. Now Mr. Tutton is one of the ablest public men in Swansea, and he exercises considerable in- fluence in the Council Chamber. A con- tinuance of his prese'lt high-handed conduct will lose him many good friends, and lessen his power and usefulness as a member of the Corporation. He is playing into the hand6 of those who would gladly see him occupying a fubordinate position. < < w Alderman Leeder's selection for the vacant Coronership has occasioned much surprise iø Swansea. It shows he is veiy popular amonff the Corporation members. It is stated that neither Dr. Rawlings nor Mr. Talfourd Stride had applied for the position, and for that reason the first named intends, we under- stand, re-opening the question at next week's meeting of the Council, by which time he will have sent in his application. This course he is urged to adopt by many influential friends, who feel that the General Purposes Commit- tee have not made a wise selection. Alder- man Leedcr has a strong following, and many of his colleagues regard him as an almost ideal public representative. Others again hold different views. However, the question will in all probability be discussed at some length next week. w An excellent series of geological, botanical and archeological excursions have been arranged by the Swausea Scientific Society for the coming season. Mr. W. Terrill, the hon. sec., has worked most zealously to make the programmes varied and attractive, and in this he has succeeded. Penllergaer, Gower.. Scutherdown and Bridgend, Cray, Penwyllt, etc., will be visited, and important papery read. Those desirous to take part in these highly enjoyable and instructive ex- cursions should communicate with Mr. Ter- rill, St. George's-terrace, or the Royal Insti- tution of South Wales. • • • Mr. P. G. lies, one of tho best known, and most respected tradesmen in Swansea, hae been elected President of the Grocers' Asso- ciation. Mr. Iles takes a keen and intelli- gent interest in municipal affairs, and he is imbued with that civic patriotism which it lacking in so many of our burgesses. Mr. Isaac Gale, another very successful and enterprising grocer and general dealer, has been added to the list of V ice-Presidents, The Grocers' Association has decided to peti- tion the G.W.R. Co. to provide a refrigerat- ing car for the convayance of Irish butter from Milford to Swansea. • • • Mr. Tutton is determined to bolster up tl»* present financial administration of tb" Swansea Market. He adopts a don't-toucb' me attitude, and repudiates with scorn the idea that theprinciple of no receipts is bad. Whatever Mr. Tutton may say, the principle is bad, and it is simply astounding that the Corporation tolerate it for a week. That so experienced and shrewd a business man ae Mr. Tutton should associate himself with the system is really inexplicable. Is it because the system is attacked by Mr. Morgan Hopkin ? II Alderman Aeron Thomas, Mr. R. Martin, Alderman Howel Watkins, or any other member had sought for reform in the financial management of the market, they would have been successful long ere this. But because the would-be reformer is Mr. Morgan Hopkin, the system, rotten though it be, 16 tolerated. We assure Mr. Tutton he is doing himself no good by the stiff attitude he has thought fit to adopt in this matter. The sooner he unbends and agrees to ordin- ary business methods, the better for himself and the market. • e e When all the books on the war in South Africa are let loose on the world. anA of the most piquant will be that by Mr. Winstott Spencer Churchill, the oldest son of the late Lord Randolph Churchill, and one of the war correspondents of The Morning Post." We give Mr. Churchill his full name, because there is another Mr. Winston Churchill in the public eye, though the latter, who is it successful novelist, and author of Richard Carvel," is better known in his own country, America, than in these islands. Our Mr. Winston S. Churchill is one of the most ver- satile young men before the public to-day- He ha3 loomed largely in the newspapers of late by reason of his plucky conduct, would be inclined to Bay hiB dare-devil experiences in South Africa. But the fact is, Mr. Winston Spencer Churchill is brave end fearless in. spite of himself. He jIJ essentially the son of his father, and it i* said of him that it is his ambition to follow as closely as possible in his sire'e footsteps. From which it may be concluded that it is not as a military expert, war correspondent, journalist or novelist, that he desires to be known to the world, but as a statesman. Already he promises to become a more suc- cessful speaker than his father. There is, however, yet time for him to dash a little more about the world; he is only twenty six* Mr. Robert Buchanan is ever at it. People are still talking about his article in The Contemporary Review," in which he reviewed Rudyard Kipling's Stalky and Co. making the book the peg for tome observations on what he terms The Voice of the Hooligan." There is not a more serious literary critic in England than this successful poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist and — slasher. Mr. Buchanan slashes with the same vigour which marked the Edinburgh Review lit the days of Jeffrey—with this difference: there is no personal animus in his on- slaughts. It may not be pleasant to those of the Kipling cult to see the author of The Absent-Minded Begcar" described as H the poet of the banjo But Mr. Buchanall means what he writes, and whether we agree with him or not, wa must admit that he almost invariably gives reasons for the faith that is in him. Besides, the author of "The Shadow of the Sword may well be allowed a little latitude. Think of it he has been a worker in literature since the early sixties and therefore belong-i to a school of authors of which we may well feel proud, Sala he knew well Dickens he knew and worked for. What an interesting book of reminis- ccnces he could write! Robt. Buchanan knoW-if what it is to work and struggle, to struggle ond work. All the Year Round" was the first publication to print his early work but it is so long ago that he cannot remember what was paid him. He does remember, however, that in those early struggling darø he wrote for The Athenaeum," and that he received a remuneration at the rate of half' a,-guinea a column. The other day a medical paper gravely discussed the fighting properties of jam. has other properties, however, which shou'^ be more generally known. It lends i^ to profit-sharing. Who has not heard of the great preserve works of Mr. W. P. Hartley* J.P., at Aintree, Liverpool, where for year#