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GLAMORGAN ASSIZES. (

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THE POSITION OF PRIMARY EDUCATION…

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---_ Varieties, «&c. ------

_a-------THE CHILDREN'S CORNER.…

-----THE WELSH DICKY BIRD…

A MOST DELICIOUS LEMONADE.

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--TRIALS OF PRISONERS.

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TRIALS OF PRISONERS. i'RIDAY. George Ford pleaded guilty to breaking and entering the residence of Margaret Davies, at Heathfield, Swansea, on April 1, and stealing £ i) and some jewellei-y.-f lie prisoner, who bad done odd jobs as gardener at the house, said he was without a lodging on the night named, and, seeing the window open, was tempted.— A sentence of nine months' hard labour was passed. Mr. L. M. Riohards mentioned the case of John Shea, charged with the murder of Laura Moletski, and said that the prisoner had died in Cardiff Gaol whilst awaiting trial.-His Lordship said that he must have the evidence of identifi- cation. This was furnished by the clerk to the prosecuting solicitor, and the Judge declared himself satisfied. John Henry Mills, 19, for obtaining by false pretences three jerseys from Mr. P. Simms. Neath, was sentenced to three months' hard labour. Edward Malone and Thomas Simpson pleaded guilty to obtaining 9s. 6d. by false pretences from Mary Ann Andrews on an advance note at Barry.—The prisoners put the blame on one another, and attributed their conduct to drink. —Sentenced to six weeks each. Elijah Stuart, 1(5, fireman, was charged with placing two trolley wheels and an iron chair on the line of the Cww Pit Railway on June 20. .-He pleaded guilty.—The Judge called the father of the lad before him, who said his son was fifteen years of age. His lordship put the prisoner back, in order to consider how he might avoid sending him to prison. William Bennett Symmons, 26, grocer, was charged on three indictments with forging a Post Office money-order for 110, and with issuing as an officer of the Post Office money- orders with fraudulent intent amounting to X25 Is. Mr. W. D. Benson prosecuted, and Mr. S. T. Evans, M.P., defended the prisoner, who pleaded guilty.—Mr. Benson said that the prisoner, who had been a sub-postmaster at Glyn-Neath, had defaulted to the extent of X109 in his accounts. His Lordship sentenced prisoner to twelve months' hard labour. Thomas Madden, 24, seaman, was charged with on the 13th of April feloniously stealing a watch, the property of Stephen Galick. Mr. Villiers Meager prosecuted. The prisoner, who appeared to be a rather sharp fellow, produced good seaman's discharges, and was sentenced to three months' imprisonment only. CHARGE AGAINST A CARDIFF AUCTIONEER. -Louis Bloom, 37, auctioneer, was indicted for stealing ten £ 1 postal orders, the property of Waldemar .l'hirsoh at Cardiff. Mr. Lloyd Morgan prosecuted, and Mr. Arthur Lewis defended.—The prisoner was alleged to have abused the confidence of a Russian seaman, who gave himEIO to get postal orders and address them to his (the seaman's) father in Russia. Instead of that it was alleged that prisoner directed the envelope to his own address in .Cardiff.-Bloom was found not guilty, and dis- charged. MURDER CASES.—True bills were returned in the Swansea and Cardiff murder cases, and the date for hearing the latter was fixed for Monday. No IRUK BILL.—No true bill was returned in the case of Patrick Curry, 60, sailor, charged with stealing 15s. from the person of John Henry Williams at Barry, and he was discharged. The court then adjourned till Saturday morning. CIVIL COGRT. [Before Mr. Jnstice Kennedy.] BILLS or EXCHANGE—Mr. C. E. Dovey, estate agent and auctioneer, of Cardiff, brought an action against Mr. Walter Francis Bell, Chepstow, respecting certain bills of exchange. Plaintiff was represented by Mr. Abel Thomas, Q.C., M.P., and Mr. Sankey (instructed by Mr. T.H.Betcher, Cardiff), and for the defendant appeared Mr. B. Francis-Williams, Q.C., and Mr. S. T. Evans, M.P. (instructed by Mr. John Moxon). Mr. Dovey was trustee under the bankruptcy of one Thomas Rees, and claimed from defendant a sum of £ 600, of which JB500 was upon fivebilis of exchange accepted by the bankrupt for the defendant's accommodation and zElOO upon a cheque drawn by Thomas Rees in favour of the Metropolitan Bank, and endorsed by the bauk and the defendant. The bankrupt and Mr. Bell were guarantors of a brick company, and the main issue, so far as the plaintiff was concerned, was whether or not the money was really a transaction carried on for him or whether it was a transaction for the defendant. On two or three occasions his lordship remarked upon the complicated nature of the case. A number of witnesses were called, and the court adjourned till Saturday. SATURDAY. CRIMINAL COURT. ATTEMPTED CUIMINAL ASSAULT.—Thomas Hopkins. (27), labourer, was charged with criminally assaulting Ellen CHara, aged 14, at No. 5, Park-place, Gilfach, on the II.Ith June. Mr. Lleufer Thomas prosecuted. Evidence having been given, the jury returned a verdict of attempted assault, and prisoner was sentenced to twelve months' hard labour. INDECENT ASSAULT.—John O'Connell, (36). labourer, was indicted for having on the 4th 1 July, indecently assaulted Elizabeth Ptielle. aged 14, a domestic servant at the Greyhound Inn, Tiefoxest. Mr. Gwynn Morris prosecuted, and Mr. St. John Wiiliams defended. Prisoner was found guilty and sentenced to 1ive month./ imprisonment with hard labour. A MISCHIEVOUS YOUTH.—Elijah Stuart, was brought up to receive sentence for putting an obstruction on the Cwm Bit Railway on June 20. The Judge said he would not send I prisoner to gaol because he did not think it < would do him aoy good but he would sentence the lad to twelve strokes with the birch as a warning to other boys. HEAVY SENTENCE.—Richard Thomas, (47), seaman, was indicted for on the 16th of July, at Swansea, crimi aally assaulting his niece, Rose Smith, a girl of the age of only nine years. His Lordship commented on the atrocious nature of the case, saying the defendant, being her uncle, would naturally have been looked to for protection and not for outrage. He sentenced him to seven years penal servitude. The court adjourned till Monday morning. THE PONTARBAWE CHURCH DISPUTE.—The grand jury returned a true bill in the case of the llev. J. A. Rees and Police-constable Jenkins in connection with the technical assault in church at Alitwen, Pontardawe. NISI PRIUS COURT. [Before Mr. Justice Kennedy.] BILL OF EXCHANGE TRANSACTION. DOVEY V. BELL (part heard).—This common jury action upon certain bills of exchange was resumed. The plaintiff was Charles Edwin Dovey, acting as trustee under the bankiuptcy of one Thomas Rees and the defendant was Walter Francis Bell, of Cruk House, Chepstow. Mr. Abel Thomas, Q.C., M.P., and Mr. Sankey (instructed by Mr. T. H. Belcher, Cardiff), appeared for the plaintiff; and Mr. B. Frauci* Williams, Q.C., and Mr. S. T. Evans, M.P., were for the defendants. The jury returned a verdict for the defendant. ACTION FOR SLANDER. DAVIES v. DAVIES.—This was an action for damages for slander, brought by Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Davies, wife of Thomas Davies, engine- teuder, against Wiiliam Davies, collier. The parties reside at Rhymney. Mr. S. T. Evans, M.P,(instructed by Messrs. Powell and Hughes), appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. Lloyd Morgan for che defence.—Mr. Evans in opening said that they were quite willing to allow of the case being withdrawn if defendant would apologise and pay the costs. The slander complained of was uttered on the 3rd of December of lat year when defendant, counsel stated, said that he knew what Davies's wife was, and that he could go into plaintiff's house 4' at two o'clock in the morning as well at eight o'clock." The plaintiff's husband was an engine-tender, and had occasionally to be at work all night consequently, the statement would affect her character.—The words were utterly denied by defendant. The jury found a verdict for plaintiff, with £ 5 damages. The court then adjourned till Monday. A DEFAULTING JUROR.—Mr. H.W. Leaker, a juryman, who had been sitting on a partly- heard case in the nisi-prius court, was called up and cautioned by Mr. Justice Kennedy for being late and keeping the court waiting. The juror was not put in the box, but neither was he allowed to leave the court. SUNDAY. On Sunday morning the judges attended St. Mary's Church in state, together with the High Sheriff (Mr. L. D. Nicholl) and the Sheriff's Chaplain. Their Lordships were met by the Mayor and Corporation at the Town-hall, and were conducted through the plincipal streets to the Parish Chnrch. The procession was on a large scale and attracted much attention. The service was conducted by Chancellor Smith and the Rev. W. Morgan curate. The Assize sermon was preachel by the Sheriff's Chaplain (Rev. Mr. Creighton, lioath). The choir sang magnificently t\e "Te Deum" and the anthem, Praise the Lord, 0 Jerusalem)," was rendered with excellent effect. Mr. Radcliffe accompanied on the organ. After the service the judges were driven back direct to the Uplands. MONDAY. CRIMINAL COURT. THE CARDIFF MURDER CASE. Charles John Caveill, (27), labourer, was indicted for the wilful murder, on the 15th March, 1899, at Cardiff, of Margaret Josephine Caveill. Mr. W. U. Benson and Mr. L. M. Richards appeared for the Crown, and Mr. Ivor Bowen for the defence. At the outset the question was raised whether the prisoner was fit to plead. Dr. Pringle, medical superintendent of the Glamorgan County Asylum, was called. He deposed to visiting the prisoner on several occasions, and said that visiting him that morning he found him dull and listless in manner, confused in thought and frequently incoherent in his state- ments. He did not think he was in a fit state to understand his position Replying to counsel for the defence, he said that from his examina- tion of that day he did not think prisoner was of sufficient intellect to understand his position. By Mr. Benson He is insane. In answer to his Lordship, witness stated that when he asked prisoner if he knew for what reason he was brought there that morning, he replied, Yes; for my trial." Prisoner had been told that, but he did not know whether his wife was dead or alive. The man was also full of illusions about bis wife having tried to poisoa him many times. Dr. Treharne, of the Cardiff Prison, also deposed to the confused state of prisoners' mind. The Judge, addressing the jury, said that in order that a man might plead he should not onlv be able to say whether he was guilty or not, but also to instruct Counsel for his defence. If a man was in that state of mind that he did not understand what was going on about him, he was not fit to be tried. It was for them to say whether prisoner was fit or not. While the jury was deliberating, prisoner arose and exclaimed I did not poison my wife I loved her with my whole heart and soul." The jury decided tbat the prisoner was not fit to plead and he was ordered to be detained during her Majesty's pleasure. ALLEGED CONCEALMENT OF BIRTH. Blanche Young, a young woman, was charged with having on or about the 9th June last, endeavoured to conceal the birth of a male child. Mr. Lovat ifraser was for the prosecution, and Mr. Arthur Lewis and Mr. Douglas Lewis for the defence. The jury having been sworn, Miss Jenner, bowing to his Lordship, said, May it please your Lordship, I plead for my fallen sister." She went on to say something about the prisoner being respectable and industrious, and that she was present at the expense of the ratepayers to plead for her fallen sister." The Judge said he was afraid he could not hear her. Miss Jenner Then I ask yonr Lordship to deal with her under the First Offtn lers' Act. Evidence was then called, but his Lordship said it was very slierhi, and not sufficient to connect the prisoner with the child that had been found, although the prisoner had herself admitted giTing birth to a child. The jury agreed with his Lordship, and the prisoner was discharged. ALLEGED MANSLAUGHTER AT MERTHYR. Norah O'Regan, (22), married woman, was charged with the manslaughter of her child, Daniel James O'Regan on the 2nd April, at Mertbvr. Mr. North more Jones appeared for the prosecution, and prisoner was undefended. Whilst the jury was being sworn, however, Miss Jenner, addressing his Lordship, stated that she appeared on behalf of the ratepayers of MClthyr. The Judge said she was quite at liberty to instruct counsel, whereupon Miss Jenner moved over to where Mr. Rowland \aughan Williams was sitting, and, putting some money into the barrister's hand, remarked It's public money your lordship." Mr. R. Vaughan Williams then undertook the defence. Ruth Williams, a married woman of Merthyr, stated that on the 3rd April the prisoner came to her house with her baby. From there the woman went to a public-house, and, after drinking there for some time, returned to witness's house, where she laid down upon a bed with her child. Some time afterwards witness found that the child was dead. Dr. Ward stated that death was due to overlaying, cases of which were only too common. The jury broughtin a verdict of "Sot guiity," and the Judge, in discharging the prisoner, said she had acted very carelessly towards her child. ATTWKLL AGAIN—George Attwell, (26), laliourer, was charged with as-saulting Elizabeth Jarvis, and stealing from her person an umbrella, at the same time using personal violence towards her, on tl e 24th May last. Mr. L. M. Richards (instructed by Mr. Laurence 1 Richards) was for the prosecution and Mr. Lloyd Morgan (instructed by Mr. Hy. Thompson) defended. Prisoner, at the last Assizes at Swansea, was sentenced by Mr. Justice Wills to a severe flogging for a similar offence to the one with which he was now charged.—Prosecutrix stated that on the even- ing in question, she was proceeding home about eleven o'clock, and when in a rather quiet part of the town, the prisoner, who bad followed her for some considerable nistance. came up to her. He seized her roughly by the arm, and pushed her against the wall. She screamed out for assistance, and three men appeared on the scene, whereupon Attwell ran away with the umbrella which he had taken from her. Cross-examined by Mr. Lloyd Morgan prosecu- trix stated that prisoner was not drunk. He did not hit her. but the pressure of her shoulders against the wall hurt her considerably. Two brothers named Chard, and another man named George Hopkins, of the Mexico Fountain, Neath-road, deposed to seeing the prisoner going away with the umbrella, and P.C. Cross; gave evidence as to the arrest. When charged, Attwell exclaimed, Good God" and commenced to cry. He admitted walking away with the article, but denied ever touching the woman. The jury retired for a short time and on returning gave a verdict of guilty of robbery without violence. The Judge sentenced prisoner to eighteen months' hard labour, saying that if he came there again he would be sent to penal servitude. Br GAMY.—A respectably attired woman named Martha George, (29), surrendered to bail on a charge of bigamy by marrying Arthur Jones this year, when the hushand- whom she had married in 1893, Thomas jleorge, was still alive. Mr. T. Walter Williams pnsecuted. Defendant admitted the offence, bat added that she didn't know she was breaking the law.—The Judge said it was a very serious offence, and ordered the woman to stand down until the following day. SENTENCES. William Henry Newton, (25), fish-curer, pleadedjfguilty to {stealing a horse, cart, and harness at Pontypridd on June 28. Mr. Lloyd Morgan prosecuted. Prisoner, who got away to Cardiff with the horse and sold it for £4, had been previously convicted of false pretences.— Sentenced to nine months' hard labour. Rose Riley pleaded guilty to window smashing at Cardiff, to the extent of £ 11.—t She was sentenced to nine months' hard labour. Edward Mitchell, (21), labourer, pleaded guilty to three charges of obtaining articles by false pretences at Cardiff. He was sentenced to eighteen months' hard labour. George S. Jenks was charged with forging an advance note for £2 19s. Cd. at Cardiff. He pleaded guilty.—Mr. Tudor Howell, who prosecuted, said that the county police had another charge pending against the prisoner on another advance note. Detective Scott said prisoner was a fireman of previous good charac- ter.—The Judge said that he intended his sentence to cover both offences, aud would communicate with the county to that effect. He sentenced prisoner to twelve months' hard labour. Samuel Brown, an aged" printer," pleaded guilty to picking the pocket of Mary Thomas, at Cardiff. Mr. J. Walter Williams prosecuted. Prisoner had been previously convicted on many occasions in Dorsetshire, but they had not been charged in the indictment.—Prisoner handed a paper to the judge, who said he must sentence prisoner, who appeared to live by crime, to a long period of imprisonment—eighteen months' hard labour. George Westgarth,aged 21, pleaded guilty to forging a colliery pay-ticket by altering the figures in the shilling column to the extent of 10s. He had been convicted several times at Bristol, and was described as a pilferer.—He was sentenced to three months' hard labour. CIVIL COURT. [Before Mr. Justice Kennedy and a Special Jury.] BRECONSHIRE COMMON RIGHTS. EVANS V. MERTHYR DISTRICT COUNCIL.— This action will be remembered as having occupied a considerable time at the last Summer Assizes, whither it had been remitted from the Court of Chancery. The jury then found that the land in dispute, Torglas, was in the parish of Llanfrynach and, further, that it was commonable land. This finding ended a dispute between the parishes of Cartref and Llanfrynach, who stood by the decision that the land in dispute was in Llanfrynach. Since the last assizes, the case had been to the Court of Appeal, and his Lordship was now directed to decide whether a specific piece of land on Tor Glas was commonable or freehold. The nature of the action was one for specific performance of an agreement. Mr. S. T. Evans, M.P., Mr. Ivor Bowen and Mr. Raymond Allen (instructed by Mr. D. T. Jeffreys) represented the commoners, and Mr. B. Francis Williams, Q.C., and Mr. Rowlands (instructed by Mr. G. C. James) appeared for the Merthyr Tydfil District Council. In an opening statement Mr. S. T. Evans explained that the question to be decided was whether a piece of land comprising 8a. 1r. 24p. was common or freehold land. The Merthyr Tydfil District Council in the Session of 1895 promoted a Bill in Parliament for the acquisition of certain land in the county of Brecon for the purpose of extending their water supply, and a certain agreement was arrived at by the promoters and those interested in the common land by which the commoners were willing to accept £40 per acre for any extinction of their commonable rights. Upon the passing of the Bill the District Council took, among other plots, the piece of land on Tor Glas in dispute, declining, however, to pay the agreed sum for it on the ground that it was a freehold plot duly conveyed to them by Mr. Gwyn Holford, the lord of the' manor of Pencelly Wallensis, or Welsh Pencelly, in which manor Tor Glas is situate. The manor existed as far back as Henry VIII.. and Tor Glas had been treated as waste land both by the parishioners and the predecessors in title of the manor of Welsh Pencelly, being used by them as sheep walks according to the Welsh custom of arosfa. The manor was held as a Crown manor until the year 1816, but prior to that, in 1762, Mr. Tbynne Howe Gwyn, the great-grandfather of Mr. Gwyn Holford, was appointed under the Crown as steward. He accounted for rents, but he was steward so long—about 55 years—that he appeared towards the end of that period to have come to the conclusion in his own mind that the manor belonged to him. That appeared from certain legal proceedings in order to perpetuate certain testimony taken in 1816, when Mr. Thynne Howe Gwyn brought an action against a man. named Clifton for damages for trespass upon land not far from the piece in dispute. The trial took place at the Hereford Assizes, and while the parties were fighting Mr. Clifton stole a march upon his opponent and ascer- tained that Mr. Gwyn was not the proprietor but the steward of the manor, and ultimately bought from the Crown the land over Mr". Thynne Howe Gwyn's head. For the purposes of the trial a survey of the manor was made by a surveyor of great eminence at that time, Mr. John Cheese, of Hereford, who in his report said the manor had been so long held by Mr. Thynne Howe Gwyn that it was impossible by any information to ascertain the boundaries on the enclosed lands, but he was able to give. along with three other pieces of waste land, the area of Tor Glas and boundary as the commoners claimed existed to-day. In 1824 there was a sale of the manor by Mr. Clifton to Mr. Thynne Howe Gwyn, who died two years later, and by the testator's will the whole of the manor- ial rights of Welsh Pencelly went to the second son, but with an option to purchase in favour of his granddaughter, who subse- quently became the lady of the manor, and upon her marriage Mrs. Gwyn Holford, the mother of the present proprietor, who sold to the District Council. That was the history of the manor, and to show that Tor Glas was waste land be relied first of all upon the survey of Mr. Cheese and then upon various presentments to the Court Leet, by which it 1 was set forth that it was held as a sheep walk in connection with Blaentaff Farm, and that parishioners from the adjoining parish of Cartref had been fined for using the arosfa rights on Tor Glas. By another presentment it was shown that in 1783 an ancient roan of éO years with others perambulated the manor and in detail gave the boundaries of all the waste lands, including Tor Glas, which agreed with the boundaries of to-day. Coming to the title of Blaentaff Farm. counsel said that although Mr. Gwyn Holford was the lord of the manor, yet he did not possess a single yard of land in the parish of Llanfrynach. He had shown how Mr. Gwyn I Holford came into possession of the manor, but he was sorry to say that he was not able to show any title by which he could claim land in Llanfrynach. The farm down to 1847 was held by Mr. De WTinton, who sold to Mr. Richards. The latter thought he was entitled to the freehold of Tor Glas, but about the year 1880, whilst the District Council was taking over land for the purposes of their water works under previous Parliamentary powers, it suddenly dawned upon Mr. Gwyn Holford that he should obtain all he could, and he accordingly sent down his agent to Mr. Richards saying he must give up his rights to Tor Glas. Why Mr. Richards never knew, but being unable to engage in a law- suit with so powerful a person as the lord of the manor, he consented to enter into an agreement, which the agent proposed, by which he was to pay 5s. a year for the pasturage on Tor Glas. An act of that kind, however, was not binding upon the commoners in general, who subsequently broke down certain boundary stones that the lord of the manor had put there, and proclaimed the common free again.—Evidence was then called, and the Court adjourned till Tuesday. TUESDAY. CRIMINAL COURT. AN OFFENCE AGAINST SOCIETY."—Martha George, upon whom sentence was deferred on the previous day, was now sentenced-to six months' hard labour for bigamy, the Judge commenting upon the seriousness of her offence against society. LENIENCY.—Thos. Collins (1G), labourer, who had pleaded guilty to a charge of criminally assaulting, at Barry, Mary Ellen Ellwood, aged eight years, was brought up to receive sentence. The Judge sentenced him to 12 strokes with the birch rod. SERIOUS CHARGE AGAINST A POSTMAN.— David Hanbury (31), postman, surrendered to his bail upon a charge of stealing postal letters containing money and cheques.—Mr. W. D. Benson (instructed by Mr. J. C. Thomas, Merthyr,) appeared for the prose- cution, Mr.' Ivor Bowen (instructed by Mr. Jeffreys, Neath,) defended.—John Chas. Jones, grocer, Cwmavou, deposed to giving prisoner, who was a postman for that district, four letters to post. One contained half-a-sovereign in cash, two others cheques, and the fourth contained a receipt. Witness also gave prisoner money to buy stamps, and he put the letters in his bag.—Mr. Jenkin Jones, to whom one of' the letters in question was addressed, proved not receiving it.—Mr. Morgan Thomas, post-master of Port Talbot, and Miss Joseph, an assistant at the Cwm- avon sub-Post Office, having given evidence, Wm. Thomas Edwards, an inspector, was called. He stated that, having received instructions to investigate the reported loss of the four letters, he had an interview with Hanbury. The latter, in the course of the interview, said he remembered receiving the four letters. He purchased stamps and posted them. Hanbury afterwards contra- dicted himself, saying he put the letters in his pocket and forgot all about them. On finding them in his pocket nearly a week afterwards he got frightened and placed them in the fire. — Learned counsel having addressed the jury, his Lordship summed up. He said it was essential in the interests of the public that letters put to the post should be properly delivered, and that persons employed in the service of the Post Office-- and they were generally persons of good character—should discharge tceir duties in a proper manner. The jury, after a brief consultation,' returned a verdict of guilty.—In passing sentence, the Judge said the jury could not have come to any other conclusion as the evidence was very clear. It was very sad that a young man should have forfeited his character in such a manner. Cases of that kind must be dealt with severely, but he would deal with him as leniently as possible. The sentence would be nine calendar month's imprisonment. SEQUEL TO A CARDIFF STREET FIGHT.— Margaret Ellen Rees (24), Cardiff, was indicted with killing and slaying Catherine McCarthy, on the 5th April.—Mr. Lloyd Morgan prosecuted, and Mr. St. John Williams Idefended. — It appeared from the evidence that the prisoner and deceased met at the Salutation Hotel, Bute-street, Cardiff, on April 5th. They had a quarrel, which ended in a fight taking place in the street. Prisoner struck McCarthy a blow behind the left ear, both fell down, and the latter the following day succumbed to his injuries. A doctor was called to give evidence, and he said the clot of blood which caused death might have been caused by a blow, but it was more probable that it was caused by a fall.— In his address to the jury, Counsel for the defence contended that what was done by the prisoner was in self-defence.—The Judge, in summing up, however, said no one was justified in defending himself unless he was unable to get away, which was not the case in this particular case, because prisoner was the stronger party.—The jury found the prisoner not guilty," and she was dis- charged, the Judge advising her to keep out of street brawls in future. FRAUD. — Francis Sidney Wellman (26), saddler, pleaded guilty, to fraudulently obtaining, on the 21st July last, at Llanwonno, £11 of the money of Morgan Jones, with intent to defraud. Sentenced to 12 calendar months' imprisonment. Mr. Rhys Williams prosecuted. FRAUD AT CARDIFF. — Henry Bruton Abberley (24), clerk, well educated, was Abberley (24), clerk, well educated, was charged with, on or about the 17th of January, at Cardiff, feloniously altering an order tor the payment of a banker's cheque with intent to defraud.—Mr. Ivor Bowen and Mr. Plews prosecuted.—The prisoner was secretary of a club at Cardiff called the Antediluvian Institute of Buffaloes, and he was proved to have altered the amount of a cheque from £2 to £2 lis.—The prisoner, a smart young fellow, conducted his own defence.—He was found guilty, but recom- mended to mercy on the ground of the laxity shown by the club authorities, and his lordship sentenced him to six months' hard labour only. SECOND CROWN COURT. [Before Mr. Abel Thomas, Q.C., Commis- sioner.] THREATENED WITH THS "CAT." — Evan Bevan and John Lewis, Aberdare, were indicted for robbing with violence a man named Henry Griffiths, at Aberdare, on Saturday night, July 1.—The jury returned a verdict of guilty, and the Commissioner, in passing sentence, questioned whether he should not order the cat." However, they had not been previously convicted for stealing, and he would only sentence them to six months' hard labour. ROBBING A CARDIFF CHAPEL. — John Williams, fifteen, and Alfred Broom, eighteen, were charged with breaking and entering Roath Congregational Chapel, Cardiff, on April 20, and stealing 3s. from the vestry.— Mr. Trevor Lewis prosecuted, and Mr. Vaughan Williams appeared for the prisoner Williams, Broom pleading guilty.—The jury found prisoners guilty, but recommended them to mercy on account of their youth.— Broom was sentenced to one month and Williams was liberated on his own recog- nisances. UTTERING A FORGED CHEQUE.—Catherine Page, fifteen, was indicted for obtaining from Ethel Fryer, at Cardiff, on June 21, two skirts, the property of Winter Lates, by virtue of a forged cheque, well knowing the same to have been forged.—Prisoner pleaded guilty.—The Commissioner ordered the girl back to gaol to be dealt with by one of the judges later in the assires. A CARDIFF SHOOTING CASE. — Charles i Trenchard (37), hairdresser, was indicted for feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously shooting at John Davies, at Cardiff, on May 8, with intent to do him grievous bodily harm. Defendant, who had been liberated on bail, pleaded not guilty.—Mr. Kelly prosecuted 1 and Mr. Arthur Lewis appeared for the ] defence.—The jury found the prisoner guilty, and the Commissioner, in passing sentence of < nine months, hoped it would deter others j from committing a like offence. < CIVIL COURT. < THE BRE'JONSHIRE COMMON CASE. J EVANS V. MEBTHTRTYDFII, URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. —»-When the Court resumed its 1 sitting on Tuesday further evidence was < failed for the plaintiffs, and Mr. B. F. ] Williams, Q.C., in opening for the defendants, t traced the history of the lands in question back for several hundred year3. Coming to < more recent times, he devoted his attention to < the Parliamentary survey of 1651, and (

--TRIALS OF PRISONERS.