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HIGH WATER IN SWANSEA HARBOURI…

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AGRICULTURAL NOTES.

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ISWANSEA'S OLDESTI POSTMAN.

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BIG STEEL PLA/TE CONTRACT.

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THE UOYAL JUBILEE METAL EXC…

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"THE ONLY WAY" AT THE GRAND…

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"THE ONLY WAY" AT THE GRAND THEATRE. There is all the fascination of the French Revolution in the play at the Grand Theatre this week, mingled with the refinement and human interest with which Charles Dickens clothed his stories and his characters. A Tale of Two Cities has been called a melo- dramatic novel. It deals with a melo- dramatic period, but somehow or other the characters which Dickens sketched with his human pen possess far more than a melo- dramatic interest, and the stage picture of his well-knit story, with all its revolutionary fire-brands and cool English courage, towers above melodrama into the regions of sweet and pure romance. The story is told in a prologue and four acts. The prologue gives a sordid glimpse into the tyrannies of the aristocratic classes in France in the years immediately preceding the Revolution. Jean Detarge," a peasant, crosses swords with the Marquis de St. Evremonde in order to avenge the dishonouring of his sister, and Jean dies in the arms of Dr. Manette," who has been called in to attend I the poor girl, and who, because gold will not purchase his silence, is thrown into the Bastille. The play opens 19 years later in London, where Dr. Manette" and his daughter have taken refuge. Charles Darnay," the son of the Marquis, has also taken refuge in London as a teacher of languages, ashamed of the excesses of his order. He has fallen in love with Lucie Manette." The play opens just after the trial of "Darnay" on a charge of which the eloquence of Sydney Carton had acquitted him. But Sydney Carlton," one of those brilliant but bibacious wits, who practised in the courts in the old days, has also fallen in love with Lucie," attracted to the beati- ful face by the tears that fell for her arraigned lover. Carlton hates "Darnay"; but he knows tbit "Lucie's" happine3s depends upon his life, and he gives up love's battle. Love is good, but liquor's better, and death is best of all," he says with a prophetic glance at his own destiny. The better side of his character comes out when "Darnay"has been entrapped back to Paris and is arraigned before the Revolutionary Tribunal. Carton's glowing eloquence at first obtains his acquittal; but the memory of his father's misdeeds once more condemns "Darnay." to the guillotine, and when all hope of rescue seems lost Carton, who bears a striking likeness to 'his favoured rival, takes his place in the Conciergerie. It is the only way, he says, and as he ascends the guillotine platform his musical and eloquent voice is heard It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have done it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known." The play lacks much of that glar- ing, fervid Carlylean fire with which Dickens painted Revolutionary Paris; but its tableaux and incidents are stirring, whether we take the thrilling eloquence of ''Sydney Carton" in the Tribunal, the fury of inob-justice, the fastidious gallantry with which the gentle- men of France meet their doom, or that calm, self-sacrificing and beautiful close to a life that rose, by some strange fatality, from a careless existence into a fascinating romance. Mr. Win. Haviland as Sydney Carton" brings the power of thrilling elo- quence to assist his very considerable talents as an actor, and Miss Amy Coleridge makes a charming "Lucie." The mere mention of Mr. Asheton Tonge is sufficient guarantee of his fitness for the part of Charles Ditrnay," and all the members of the company play their parts remarkably well. The Only Way is a thrilling play thrillingly acted. "THE LITTLE MINISTER" NEXT WEEK. The return visit of The Little Minister'' to the Grand Theatre next week is anxiously looked forward to, and there is a probability that the houses will be as full as on the occa- sion of the first visit of the play to Swansea. It is probably one of the most charming stage-plays of our time, and inasmuch as it will be played by a strong company the patrons of the Grand can depend upon some enjoyable evenings. We say evenings because no one will be satisfied with seeing "The Little Minister" only once.

THE BEST TONIC.

A LESSON IN SPELLING.

SWANSEA FLOWER SHOW ROYAL…

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SURPRISING TINPLATE PRICES.

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A WELSH MILLIONAIRE COAL-OWNER.

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