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----------ATHLETIC NOTES.

FOOTBALL. :

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---LITERARY BUREAU.

THE LOSS OF CITY OF BRISTOL.

THE HOOLEY BANKRUPTCY.

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CONTEMPORARY CHAT.

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------------NOTES AND QUERIES.…

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BOYS' BRIGADES.¡

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BOYS' BRIGADES. A PROTEST. TO THE EDITOR OF THE CAMBRIAN." Sip.My attention has lately been called to the rapid increase of boys' brigades all over England and Wales. Keenly interested as I am in education, and in all questions of social reform, and realising how rapidly these boys' brigades are gaining ground, I have tried to learn wnat I can about the movement. We have had in the Salvation Army a splendid example of the effectiveness of military organisa- tion, and for young boys' with their hearts full of enthusiasm for soldiering and adventures, it is easy to see and understand why a military organ- isation would be even more attractive and effec- tive in their case than with grown-up men and women in the Salvation Army. Again the type of boy at present helped by the boys' brigade, is that type which wants help very badly-the young lad freed from the restraint of school, usually much too early, and as yet without the responsibilities and restraints of society and life. These lads form probably the class that wants most the discipline of military organisation and on the physical side the educational effect of gymnastics must be excellent for them. It still seems, how- ever, a very doubtful policy for the Church of the Prince of Peace to be doing something suspiciously like producing embryo soldiers. For those of us who believe that war is unchristian, our duty seems obviously to do all we can to put an end to boys' brigades as at present constituted. The case ia different for those who believe that war is still sometimes a stern necessity. We know it is a great difficulty to recruit for our voluntary army, and it has been urged more than once that the boys' brigades will tend to develope the military spirit, and be valuable recruiting ground for the army. Even if this is not the intention of those who start boys' brigades, it is surely desirable that the question should be considered whether boys' brigades have any tendency in this this direction, and for those of us who 00 not want anything to do with developing the military spirit our duty seems clear, that we must not help. It seems incongruous to put into the hands of young lads weapons of destruction and death, and to claim from them only the blind obedience which is necessary in an army, however desirable it may be to develope this obedience side by side with the more rational obedience to one's own conscience and the laws of our nation. I was keenly interested the other day to bear of a very interesting experiment which is being tried at Colne. It seems to possess all the advantages of its own. I will venture to give a few details. It is called the Boys' Life-Guards Brigade. A simple uniform has been adopted and the cap bears on the front the sign of peace and Christian help-the Geneva Red Cross. Its motto is I serve," and its work is threefold—to honour life, to help life, to save life. It is in connection with a Nonconformist church in the town of Colne, and all the members have to be total abstainers, but of course these are details which are not essential to the scheme. The objects as described by the founders are as follows:—" To advance Christ's kingdom among boys by teach- ing them to be obedient, reverent, helpful, to forgive injuries, to be unselfish, and at all times live peacefully." This organisation is not to be of a military character, but life-helping and life-saving drill (ambulance, fire-drill, and exercises fcr the saving of life from drowning) shall be used as a means for securing the interest of the boys, and binding them together in the work of the biigade. A Roll of Honour shall be hung in the Sunday School, and upon it shall be inscribed the name of any member who shall distinguish himself by doing a deed of true heroism, viz saving life from drowninar, or fire, or other peril." The advantages of this kind of boys' brigade seem obvious. It must be good to train boys to be skilful in saving life, and it seems a more I ideal and better preparation than the ordinary Boys' Brigades for the life of a citizen in an orderly country where war is an exception, and where the works and triumphs of peace are far more the duty of the average citizen than the work and glories of war. A great improvement has taken place in most religious communities and in most sections of the universal church, towards incorporating in religious work plans and schemes which have proved useful in secular matters. Ministers of religion have become more concerned themselves in social improvement and social progress, and this movement is full of hope. There is however, a danger lest the religious world should smk into using unworthy methods for the sake of I popularity, and power. I feel strongly that the plan at Colne is on very much higher lines and much more suitable to the work of a Christian church than the ordinary boys' brigade. There is, of course, not the slightest reason why the ordinary boys' brigades should not be turned at once into life-saving brigades. They would then form most excellent training grounds for our future citizens. Indeed in the army of life-savers and life-helpers there would be found room for even girls and women, and we might have our amateur nurses incorporated into a girls brigade. I venture to use your paper to bring before my fellow countrymen this now development in boys brigades which seems to be to be very much superior to the old lines, and as I said before, to have all its advantages and none of its dis- advantages. Further details can be obtained from the Rev. E. Leonard, Colne.—Believe me, Yours truly, ELIZABETH P. HUGHES. The Cambridge Training CollegeOct. 31st,18 J8.

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-----"_.---__-----CHIPS OF…

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NEATH TOWN COUNCIL.