Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

19 articles on this Page

----------ATHLETIC NOTES.

FOOTBALL. :

Advertising

---LITERARY BUREAU.

THE LOSS OF CITY OF BRISTOL.

THE HOOLEY BANKRUPTCY.

Advertising

[No title]

CONTEMPORARY CHAT.

News
Cite
Share

CONTEMPORARY CHAT. The admission of LoKitchener to the hono- rary freedom of the City of London adds one mora to the long list of military men whom the City of London has honoured. During the present reign ten Major-Generals, three Lieutenant- Generals, two Generals, one Field-Marshal, and *ne a ^0mman(!er*in"C"ef have received the freedom, as well as a few naval officers—three Admirals, one Commodore, and one Captain. Many of the number attained higher rank after their admission to the freedom of the City, but the above refers to their rank at the time when the freedom was conferred upon them. This list includes, amongst others, such names as Lord Seaton, Sir Charles Napier, Lord Hardinge, Lord Lyons, the Duke of Cambridge, Sir James Out- ram, Lord Napier of Magdala, Lord Roberts, and Lord Wolseley. The "Sword of Honour presented to the Sirdar by the Corporation of London, is a striking piece of work, and worthy of both the donors and the recipient. The hilt is of solid 18-carat gold, headed with the British Lion, and the decoration'is of rich RENAISSANCE treatment, in chased and repoas86 work. On the obverse is a finely chased figure representing "Britannia," while on the reverse is that of "Justice." Lord Kitchener's monogram, composed of diamonds, rubies, and sapphires, is introduced, and the hilt is enriched with a series of decora- tive jewels, the reverse having a panel bearing the British and Egyptian flags, enamelled in proper colours. The scabbard has two massive 18-carat gold bands, the upper having, among national emblems, the arms of the City of London, while on the reverse appear, in appro- priate panels, a view of the planting of the fags on Gordon's Palace at Khartoum, and the decoration of the Bath below, the centre band being decorated with palms and mottoes, the names of the Sirdar's victories being prominently shewn. The lower end of the scabbard is like- wise of gold, and is adorned with trophies of English and Egyptian weapons, with those of the Dervish tribes beneath. The blade is of finest steel, the upper portion being elaborately damascened with gold in Oriental fashion, and the lower etched in diffrent tones. The emblems on the blade have a strict relation to the presen- tation. Our own naval officers and men will agree heartily with the conclusion arrived at by an American writer in Scnbner's as to the dangerous and nerve-trying nature of torpedo-boat work. Writing on "Torpedo-boats in the War with Spain," he says: We have learnt that the torpedo- boat service has been the most dangerous afloat. More men have lost their lives on torpedo-boats than on all the other naval ships put together. We know that this service tries the men, in nerves and muscles, more than any other, while young officers have had the responsibility of independent commands. So this service has done more than all others to improve the per- sonnel of the navy. And it is not unlikely that the most helpful part of the experience of the battleship crews was that had when they faced the black mouth of Santiago Harbour, watching for an enemy that had not the nerve to come. The draft report which Lord Peel has drawn up for the consideration of his colleagues of the Licensing Commission has now been issued to the members. It is reported that his lordship invites the Commissioners to urge the desira- bility of prohibiting by statute the sale of drink to children, and also of making the hours during which licensed premises are open on Sundays the same in all parts of England. For the rest, the recommendations will probably refer, for the most part, to the consolidation of existing laws so that the public will probably be able to know where it stands in the future, which is certainly more than it can do at present. Commenting on the announcement that the sentence on John Darcy, condemned to death for what is known as the Oakley-street murder, has been commuted to penal servitude for life, the London Evening Neu,$ says: Such a decision can only increase the just contempt which is already widely felt for the disgraceful manner in which the revision of sentences is carried out, and the prerogative of mercy exercised by the Home Office. The murder for which Darcy was sentenced was as dastardly and motiveless a crime as could be imagined; the witnesses in the case were threatened by the associates of the murderer until the trial had twice to be postponed to ensure their attendance; and when the law has triumphed and a just sentence has been imposed the crass stupidity of the Home Secretary intervenes with a decision that will do more to increase Hooliganism than anything that can be imagined. After this outrageous decision, how can we ever hang anyone again ? Will not the Home Secretary reprieve the poor man Ryan, who only murdered a policeman on duty, to gratify his rooted objection to the force ? The fate he has dreaded has already over- taken Luccheni. The crimirml anthropologists have naturally marked the murderer of the Empress of Austria for their own as a subject of scientific study. The corpus vile of the criminal will doubtless be reserved for Professor Lombroso or some expert of equal rank, but in the meantime some eager investigators have been studying photographs of Luccheni. To the eye of the ordinary observer he looks a com- monplace ruffian, but the criminal anthropolo- gist we *re assured, at once sees even in a Photograph complete asymmetry of the body. Amyotrophy of the face, neck, trunk, arm, and lpg" on the left side, is very maiked. These sticmata are the consequences of grave cerebro- spinal lesions occurring m infancy, and due to heredity, alcoholic atavism, or some disease of infancy, perhaps an encephalomyelitis or lateral sclerosis, from which complete recovery never took place. It would have been more satisfac- tory (says the British Medical Journal) if the criminal anthropologists could have recognised all these evidences of criminality befoie Luccheni had perpetrated the crime which has given him the notoriety of infamy which he coveted. The Turks are at last really and truly going from Crete. The Admirals are "urging frater- nisation between the Christians and Mohamme- dans while the Turkish Candia newspaper savs'if- relies on just treatment, seeing that it is guarded by the British We accept the compli- ment well deserved, yet with thanks, says the St. James's Gazette. If our French friends can find time to look at it, when by chance it comes in their way, their penetrating sagacity will not fail to discover one more proof that the gold of Pitt HAS again been trotting about on its accus- tomed errand of corruption. We, on the other hand, aPplyin^0U53lV? ^^ness, may not unprofitably reflect that nothing is over except the shouting. ^171 Christian and Moham- medan fraternise is a task which will not be found easy of ma^e Christian fraternise with the Christian who happens to be divided from him by a blood feud will be no easier The Turks being disposed of and the spoil divided, the Christians now return to the settlement of their hereditary blood feuds arising out of trespasses and the ensuing murders of their respective great-great-grandfathers. The Kaiser's pardonable boast that he is the first Christian to visit the tomb of David has been met with many denials. The most inter- esting of these, perhaps, is the statement that eon* nn to say that most probably the Psalmist ST in the tomb at sll! Originally it was A convent, occupied by pious Franciscans, who regarded it as the site of the Ccer.aculum, and not" until these Christians were driven out bv Mohammedans in the fifteenth century did the legend of DAVID arise. Another microbe scare! Not in our milk—but in our boots this time. A medical paper solemnly warns its readers against wearing old boots? It declares that the leather after a time HARBOURS fearsome microbes, to prey on the feet of the unhappy wearer. Therefore it counsels us to wear new boots. That is all very well for the bootmakers, but how can we be always wearing new^ots And at what particular moment does a new boot pass over the border-line into the land'of microbes ? The great majority of us would rather risk the microbes than take the advice The next horrible discovery will be that old hats produce the bacilli of meningitis, and that hilars and hosiery that are not quite new are nroductive of diphtheria, tuberculosis,black specks before the eyes, gloomy forebodings, and all the other evils pills are made to cure. It is a novel experience for an Englishman to find himself arrested as a spy on British territory. It has been enjoyed by Mr Talbot, who was arrests in Alderney because he was seen to be K2?AP5W °?E 01 01 COUR5E' had no difficulty m proving his innocence, and, indeed seems to have acted very judiciously in offering to hand over to the authorities the plates he had already exposed; but his experi- ence is a useful hint to other enthusiastic photographers. It is not wise to carry a camera in the neiglib011^00^ of British forts just now, and others who commit Mr. Talbot's impftidence may not find it so easy as he did to establish the innocence of their intentions.

Advertising

------------NOTES AND QUERIES.…

NOTES.

[No title]

BOYS' BRIGADES.¡

Advertising

[No title]

-----"_.---__-----CHIPS OF…

Advertising

NEATH TOWN COUNCIL.