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----------ATHLETIC NOTES.

FOOTBALL. :

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FOOTBALL. CARDIFF V. SWANSEA. A GREAT GAME. Upwards of 12,000 people assembled at the St. Helen's Field on Saturday last to witness the Swansea-Cardiff match. The weather was beautifully fine, and despite the heavy rains of the morning the ground was in fairly good con- dition. An excursion from Cardiff was largely patronised, and the supporters of the Blue and Black Brigade" did not forget to make their presence known. Both sides were confident of success. On paper form Swansea should win by a respectable score. But paper form is unreli- able. The players entered the field in the pink of condition, and determined to spare no effort to win. The excitement was intense the cheering loud and prolonged, and hopes and fears rose and fell with each moment. Cardiff brought down a full team—including Gwynn Nicholls, Selwyn Biggs, Sweet-Escott, Huzzey, Dobson, Cornish, &c. There was not a single absentee. Swansea, on the other hand, took the field minus the services of Bob Thomas and Evan James—the J former a dashing, clever forward, and the latter one of the cleverest half-backs in the kingdom. Their places were taken by Arthur Jones and Reynolds respectively. Mr. Arthur Gould (New- port) was the referee. The game throughout was m<?9^ stubbornly contested. No quarter was asked for or given by either side. And as the struggle varied the excitement rose to white heat. Every bit of smart play, every inch of ground gained, evoked from the spectators loud cheers. It was a great game in every sense of the word. There was not a. dull moment in the whole seventy minutes played. And how did it all end ? In a draw In the second half Gwynn Nicholls scored a magnificent try. He went for the line with grim determination. It was a splendid individual effort, and deserved to end with a try. Swansea retaliated, and some pretty passing and inter- passing between Gordon, Rees. Trew and D. James culminated in Rees scoring. The angle was most difficult, and although Bancroft put in a fine kick he failed to place his team ahead of Cardiff. And then the struggle increased in vigour. First one side attacked, and then the other—but to no purpose and a brilliant game ended in a draw—one try each. Cardiff played beyond expectations. Their forwards are not such a weak lot as we had been led to believe. They are not adepts at heeling out, but they are a warm lot in the loose. Victory was snatched from the "All Whites" in the first ten minutes. Bancroft was com- pletely out-generalled. He allowed Gwynn Nicholls to play on oar three-quarters, with the result that three out of the four were severely hustled. George Davies was injured by the Cardiff forwards following up a high kick Trew ditto Rees was similarly knocked about; and David James was sent sprawling after he had made a mark. I think all this could have been avoided had Bancroft been on the qui vive. It rarely happens that the captain of the All Whites" makes mistakes in generalship but I am strongly of opinion that he was completely out-manoeuvred by Gwynn Nioholls on Saturday. The effect of the severe hustling to which our three-quarters were subjected early in the game was evident throughout the whole of their subse- quent play. The spirit and confidence which invariably characterise their play left them, and so we saw none of that passing which has made them such prolifio scorers Added to the partial break-down of the three-quarter line for attacking purposes, there was a distinct weakness at half. Reynolds played a hard, plucky game. He did some smart things; but his play lacked finish. David James was not seen at his best. On the whole, he was weak in defence and attack. Mr. Arthur Gould is, no doubt, a sportsman., I believe he seeks to be impartial. He is not competent, however, to referee in an important club match. On Saturday he was unfair—unin- tentionally, no doubt—to both teams; but the team which suffered most in consequence of his unfairness was Swansea. He allowed Selwyn Biggs and Sweet-Escott by far too much licence. The try scored by Rees should, in my opinion, heve been allowed. I do not like to find fault with the referee. His task is by no means a light one but it is very hard that one team should suffer more than the other in consequence of wrong decisions. While I am on this subject, might I ask why the Swansea Club acquiesces in an arrangement by which a Cardiffian referees in the Newport matches, and a Newportian in the Cardiff matches. Why is not a little variety introduced, and a western referee chosen occa- sionally ? We should then be able to form very useful comparisons. Such an arrangement would „ give general satisfaction. I do not altogether idea of going outside Wales for referees. That Cardiff and Newport do so when they meet is not very complimentary to the referees in this portion of the Principality. w But to return to Saturday's great game. On the day's form neither side deserved to win. I believe it was one of Swansea's off-days, and that in that respect our Cardiff friends were fortunate. The All Whites" made and lost several chances. Everything seemed to go wrong at the critical moment. There is no doubt the result of the contest will produce a good moral effect upon both teams. The return match will be played in March next, and if the "All Whites" maintain the form of the past month they should win. But sufficient for the day, &c.! Bancroft did not play up to his reputation, while his generalship was at fault. The Swansea threequarters did not shine because of the severe mauling they underwent in the early stages of the game. Occasionally, however, they broke through the Cardiff lot, onlv to break down themselves at a crucial moment. Dan Refs made a serious mistake in playing up so close to the scrum, and I am somewhat surprised that Bancroft did not notice it. I hope the Swansea backs will make amends at Newport to-morrow. ..Gwynn Nicholls was the best threequarter on the field. He played a great game. Bat for him &wansea would have scored at least three times. Sphere. defence was superb, and NichoSThe Card^^r'- ™^hout Selwyn Big8 and Escott upon played the Swansea couple." Haleree, over- the referee s indifference, Swansea would have held a distinct advantage at half-back. The forwards gave each other a severe gruelling. At the start the Swansea eight were slow. They not only allowed themselves to be beaten in the tight scrums, but also in the 1003e while they neglected to go to the assistance of the backs in the first ten minute* I have alluded to. Had Jackson, Parker and Serines, or any other three forwards, been near at hand Davies and Trew would not have been injured in the way they were. Once the home eight settled down to business, however, they more than held their own. Parker, Scrines, Hopkin Davies and Livingstone Davies were always to the front, the first-named especially. Jackson did some smart following up, but he lost his head on more than one critical occasion. Cornish and Blake were the pick of the Cardiff forwards, a heavy, sturdy lot, who know how to tackle. # The Bard in the Athletic News says On the whole the score fairly represents the game. If Swansea pressed oftener, and perhaps had the greater share of the play, Cardiff were oftener actually dangg,^ and towards the end looked the match off. The fine display of iriaafinn8,Can at once be traced to the for- wards—a fine lusty lot Thev started off with a superabundance of da8h and if at the middle of TEWFRX THETN^ANY?D- PUMPED• THEY RLE0.0VERED towards me end, and fairly surmised their own followers. Dobson, Cornifh BLAKE and Hughes were always noticeable. AJ U ? +n deliberate fouling alone MAR^N^H W L V of the last-named. The Swansea NLD dogged game, and both in the fern their old th?loose played finely, Parker prominent, closely followed by Serines «? "+ Davies, aAd Fuller. With regard ,U'l play, it was evident that the Cardiff quarters inspired their opponents with somethi™ approaching, terror. The old style of venting their endeavours was aa-ain adopted Jackson bewig pulled out of the scrummage os' tensibly to help Davies, who had been hurt,' but really for the object named. This failure of the Swansea men to trust their backs had a great effect on the game, and when, considering that the present quartette are about the best lot that ever did duty fo the club, cannot be well under- stood. The half-backs were well matched, and if Selwyn Biggs was too good for Reynolds David James was ditto for Sweet-Escott, who towards the close was effectively bottled up. Of the three-quarters. Nicholls the shining light. He seemed to play the opposing four alone, and thcept for a little kicking by Hussey at the start ■ the other three were never heard of. Nicholls's tfy was a wonderful effort, and the determination e showed in going for the line has never been flailed. Of the Swansea quartette, the wings ere undoubtedly the pick. Both Gordon and Played a fine game, and the former's effort ° Sees when the try waa scored deserved every praise. Trew, too, had a hand in the performance, and was responsible for the play that led up to it. Both the centres have done better, but the fact that the ball came rather slow from the scrum- mage must have hampered them. Both full backs did well, Thomas, if not kicking as far as Ban- croft, never really making a mistake. SWANSEA v. NEWPORT. To-morrow (Saturday) the All Whites" will imeet Newport at Newport. The Great Western Railway Co. announce a cheap and convenient j excursion, which should be well patronised. As I pointed out last week, Evan James will not turn out until about Christmas time, so that Reynolds will continue to partner David James. I hope Bancroft's men will make a big effort to win. A victory over Newport would prove that Saturday last was an off-day—one of those off- days which comes to every team. The team will be the same as that which did duty against Cardiff. Neath tried conclusions with Llanelly on Satur- day at Stradey. and were defeated by two tries to a goal. It was a good game, in which both sides showed up to advantage. The home backs brought off some very pretty rounds of passing. Charlie Powell waa the best half-back on the field. On Monday Llanelly defeated Penygraig by a fairly substantial score. Well done, Llanelly On Monday, at Cardiff, Glamorgan County defeated Cornwall County by four goals, four tries to one try. Bancroft, D. Rees, and Livingstone Davies represented the Swansea team. What has become known as the Badger case does not seem likely to end with the infliction of the heavy fine of £ 25 on the Swinton club. Every Northern Union supporter is in possession of the facts adduced at the meeting where the fine was imposed. Badger was called away to Wales to visit his sick child. The club played him against Leigh on his return, after having been absent from work the greater portion of the week. Mr. Platt, the secretary of the Lancashire Section, advised Mr. Mills, the Swinton secretary, not to play Badger, but the threequarter took part in the game. Now Mr. Mills writes to the papers explaining the full facts of the case. Badger's child was not expected to live, he says, and the Swinton three-quarter, in answer to a summons to the bedside, went away on Sunday, the 11th of September. He returned on the Friday night following, to the surprise of all the Swinton officials. While Badger was away Mr. Mills wrote to Mr. Platt stating that the man was not at work, presuming that he would be eligible to play if he returned in time, seeing that the circumstances were so exceptional. Mr. Platt's reply was that he would not advise him to play, as the committee would look upon! it with suspicion. Mr. Mills admits that Badger was played in face of his advice, but contends that the conditions^justified the proceedings. In view of the letters from the doctor attending Badger's child, and from his employers, the case does certainly seem a hard one, and there is no doubt Swinton have been made martyrs. The worst part of it is, however, that in addition to being mulcted in the sum of L25, the club will lose two points for playing an ineligible man. It is all very well to make martyrs and examples and all that sort of thing, but in circumstances such as those connected with the Badger case, a bit of mercy would not go amiss. If the Lancashire Committee, in dealing with the matter of the deduction of points, consider they have any justice in them, they cannot do other than allow the points to stand. We do not desire that they should countenance any irregularities, but we do think deliberate infringements ought to be punished, though our opinion of this matter is that Swinton have suffered quite sufficiently.- Athletic News. SWANSEA & DISTRICT CRICKET LEAGUE. A general meeting of the League was recently held at the Castle Cafe, Mr. W. J. Smith (Single. ton) in the chair. The chief business was the selection of a suitable date for the annual dinner and presentation of the challenge shield and medals to the winners, the Singleton 'Cricket Club. After some discussion, it was unanimously decided that the ceremony take place at the Mackworth Hotel, on Thursday, Nov. 17th, at 7.0 p.m. Mr. E. J. Joslyn, hon. sec. and treasurer, has communicated with the president, Sir John J. Jenkins, Knt., M.P., and he has kindly consented to be present. Several other prominent cricket enthusiasts have promised to attend, including Revs. John Pollock and H. S. Williams, Messrs. R. L. Sails, Hon. Odo Vivian, and R. Huleatt. Persons desirous of obtaining tickets, 3s. each, are asked to write to the hon. see., 23, Terrace-road, Mount Pleasant, Swansea, I on or before the 14th inst., as the number is limited. ANNUAL DINNER OF THE UNITE D BANKS CRICKET CLUB. The annual dinner of the United Banks Cricket Club was held on Saturday evening at the Castle Hotel. The President of the club. Mr. C. C. Vivian (manager London City and Midland Bank), occupied the chair, being supported at the cross table by Councillor Thomas Freeman, J.P., Messrs. F. Edwards, J. Gwynn Thomas, John Griffiths and A. C. Goddard (Capital and Counties Bank, Swansea), Mr. H. Edwards, Mr. J. T. Lefeaux (Pontypridd), Mr. Ronald Bill, Dr. Reid, and Mr. E. W. Clego (late of Oxford University). There were also present Messrs. Horsley Richards, F. Thorne, T. R. Griffiths, F. David, and F. Woodliffe (Capital and Counties Bank), Mr. J. Evans (Barry Dock), Messrs. Price, Jones and Hughes (London and Provincial), Mr. J. E. Griffiths (C. and C., Aberavon), Messrs. A. H. DeWinton, Bellingham, and Walters (Lloyd Bank), Mr. S. Gold (Mumbles), Mr. H. D. Wood (Ystalyfera), Messrs. F. W. Lewis, J. Bell, and W. P. Langdon (London, City and Midland), Messrs. T. 0. Meager, H. Carlisle, and J. H. Davies (Metropolitan Bank), Mr' W. R. H. Barree, Messrs. J. G. Evans, and R. G. Butland (Llanelly;, Mr. Ernest Davies, Mr. H. G. Solomon, Mr. Rowley Woodliffe, Messrs. G. D. Horsley, E. G. Richards, F. R. Barker, J. H. Owen, Jno. Clarke, H: C. Langman, S. E. Guilmant, D. C. Perkins, G. W. Bonner, J. Win tie, J. T. Gwynn (Daily Leader), G. Hazel, and others. Full justice was done to the excellent dinner provided by Mr. McBride, andi the chair- man, after a loyal speech, proposed the toast of the Queen, whic'I was seconded and drunk in a hearty manner. Mr.F.Edwnrds (Capital and Counties Bank) submitted the toast of "The United Banks c.C. coupling with it the names of the president (Mr. C. C. Vivian), the captain (Mr. T. R. Griffiths), and the hon. sec. (Mr. R. S. Woodliffe). In the course of an appropriate speech, Mr. Edwards said he believed that if a man was a good cricketer, he was also good at anything else he undertook, and, as an example, pointed out Mr. T. R. Griffiths, to whom he referred in terms of the highest praise. In conclusion, he congratu- lated the United Banks C.C., on the excellent season they had just passed through, and expressed the hope that next year they would be still more successful. The club were fortunate in having for their president such a thorough sportsman as Mr. C. C. Vivian, who, whether he was following the hounds, playing cricket, golf, or any other game, always showed true grit to the backbone. (Loud cheers.) Mr. C. C. Vivian, in responding, thanked those present for the hearty manner in which they had R«°^ED the toast, and added that the chief credit should bo given to Mr. T. R. Griffiths, who had so aoly captained the eleven during the past season, whilst the hon. seo., Mr. R. S. Woodliffe, was also deserving of their very best thanks for LIlterest he had taken in the affairs of vir»« °IUCH regretted the absence of the ted to NOW"' ^owcock, who had been promo- finished.^AWCASTLE-ON-TYNE since the cricket season chfers^aid it w^alwa^0 h™ loud to fnrtlioi. tVio T ys "ls earnest endeavour NESS^ of their WRVR+H^S their club. The kind- Drizes for the BAIT B^T-PRES^EN^ *N OFFERING two prizes tor'the beat batting and bowline averas-es had been highly appreciated bv averages was a great incentive to IMV>ROVPM PAYERS, and Mr. Woodliffe (hon. sec.) TWV II the hearty manner in which they bad6™* fu* toastof the United Banks C.C.. and ADD^n <4?*+ services were at their disposal foix^t^and as long as he remained m Swansea. uu Messrs. J. Gwynn (Daily Leader) T M Lefeaux, R. Bill, Dr. Reid, H. G. Solomon Councillor Freeman also spoke. Mr. Gwynn Thomas proposed the health of their popular and worthy president, Mr. C. C Vivian, whom he characterised as a good old English sportsman. The toast was drunk with musical honours, and Mr. Vivian, in returning thanks, said Mr. Ronald Bili had made a suggestion in regard to closing the banks at twelve o'clock on Thursdays. Per- haps if the managers of the various banks were anoroached they would consent to the arrange- ment which would give the cricketers more time to play their matches.. During the evening songs were given by Messrs. Ernest Davies, Galaher, Fred. David, Griffiths, Barree, Thorne, and Batland, and the proceed- ings, which passed off in a most pleasant manner, were brought to a close by the singing of the National Anthem. Mr. A. Greatrex ably accom- panied at the piano.

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---LITERARY BUREAU.

THE LOSS OF CITY OF BRISTOL.

THE HOOLEY BANKRUPTCY.

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CONTEMPORARY CHAT.

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------------NOTES AND QUERIES.…

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BOYS' BRIGADES.¡

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-----"_.---__-----CHIPS OF…

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NEATH TOWN COUNCIL.