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FOOTBALL.

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THE PARISH CHURCH.

SWANSEA MEDICAL SOCIETY.

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CHIPS OF NEWS.

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NOTES.

"MUSICAL PEEPS INTO PEPYS."

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Comspontate.

To CORRESPONDENTS.

THE NEW LEMONADE.

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FASHION NOTES.

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FASHION NOTES. LBY MESSRS. BEN EVANS AND CO., LIMITED SWANSEA.] This week we feel inclined to talk to you about the clothes we can make for ourselves if we like to take the trouble. And, indeed, it is well worth while doing so, for to-day the greatest charm of fashion lies in its minute detail: the tucks, the gatherings, and the open-work stitch- ery. All this can be done for ourselves, if our fingers are not quite all thumbs. For example, take the pretty trifles of lace, muslin and silk sold at the shops just now. These go to almost "ny price, and under seven-and-six are not worth the buying. Seven-and-six is a large item for a quickly-soiled stock, collar, or muslin tie, when the same can be made for less than half the sum. Here you will find some sketches of a few of the prettiest, each and all costly to buy, but easy to make. We will take No. 1. It is one of the daintiest, and has the good point of being wash- able. being of fine white muslin. First make a collar-band of muslin, neat and well-fitting, and then take into consideration the little over-hanging lapels, two of which you will see are square, about an inch and a half deep, and two inches long, the other two being about four inches long and an inch and a half deep, as these latter two are slightly frilled on to the band. Whip on to these some narrow white Swiss embroidery insertion, generally called HANDSOME AND HOMX-MADE. J beading, and to be bought for a few pence the yard. Turn the corners quite squarely, and then put on the hem, running it on the upper side and turning it over to about a third of an inch deep and hem it invisibly on the under side. Then tako a long scarf of the muslin, bem it, and in- sert the ends with the embroidery and pass it twice round the collar, bring the ends to the front, tying it in a smart bow. The second stock is of merv satin, and is of the latest shape, the points running up to the ears. Line it with white satin, and pipe it in a double hem with more white satin. No. 3 can be made in either of the two foregoing materials, and explains itself. No. 4 is made of the new checked ribbon, sewn on to a well-fitting collar-band. No. 5 is made of white silk or chiffon, the ends put on with a piping, and dots embroidered by band in silk. No. 6 is very pretty, and can be made in any attractive shade of glace silk with corners of either drawn work, fine guipure, or an open embroidery made of narrowest piping cords caught together with white thread. One of the prettiest modes of adorning this collar is with ribbon embroidery, using the narrowest ribbon. This is easy to do, and is most effective when worked with tiny flowers and leaves. The ribbon is carried risrht through, and the stalks made by ordinary em- broidery silk. A great many of the most expen- sive evening dresses will be decorated in this manner this Winter. We have had drawn fcr you two of the most charming blouses we have ever seen, and which are well worthy of your imitation. The fiist one is made in a most becoming style and can be TWO BECOMING BLOUSES. I carried out in any material. It needs, firstly, a silk or satin slip, or its prettiness will be taken away as the lace is let in transparently, fine tucks between forming the depth of a yoke. For evening wear, when you do not want to don a decolli te gown, this blouse in chiffon and lace. soft silk and lace, or any dainty, light material is charming. The other blouse is composed of a soft rosy silk. striped and dotted with white. A broad collar turns back all round from a little removable vest made of alternate strips of silk and Valenciennes batter-coloured insertion. The collar is narrowly tucked up to a conple of inches of the edge which is trimmed with Valenciennes lace. A little fly of lace sewn on to a strip of insertion hides the button-holes and buttons, and the cuffs of the bishop sleeves are made en- tirely of insertion sewn together and edged with lace. This blouse should, of course, be made en- tirely by hand unlined, and is not expensive. A smart blouse can be made of any pretty silk in a double-breasted form, the fronts ani backs cut AN INEXPENSIVE EVENING DR«SS. quite straight, and firmly sewn on to a band JU9T to porch over a little all round. The fronts should turn over in smart square rtTers, and then button to the waist with three large buttons a side, The tiny V at the throat may be filled in with a piece of lace about a yard and a half long being passed twice round the bare throat and the ends brought down in front. This is not so ehildsome as it sounds, as the lace clings to the skin. As most of the chat to-day has been of the clothes we can successfully make for ourselves, our last sketch is another example of what can be done in the matter of renovation by home fingers. An evening dress of pale blue satin just a little soiled has been utilised as a foundation for a pleated over-dress of black net spotted with little clumps of sequins, and these sequins were all put on by hand after the dress was sun-ray pleated. At intervals all up the skirt little ruches of net are fixed, and a piece of sequined and beaded net and embroidered in delicious shades of blue and pink, edges the decolletage. The points of this are held up on the shoulders by little chains of blue stones. The sleeves are transparent, tight, and ruched, and the waist-belt is of blue satin.

SWANSEA MEDICAL SOCIETY.