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THE PARISH CHURCH.

SWANSEA MEDICAL SOCIETY.

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SWANSEA MEDICAL SOCIETY. ANNUAL BANQUET. Sjd W. MAC'CORMAC THE GUEST. The annual banquet of the Swansea Medical Society was held at the Royal Hotel on Friday evening. There was a large aud representative gathering. The banqueting hall ot the Royal was tastefully decorated, and the tables were well laid. The following was the menu :— HORS D'OEUVRES, Mumbles oysters. POTAGES. Clear ox tail. Thick mock turtle. POISSONS. Turbot. Lobster sauce. Fillets of sole. Tar tar sauce. ENTREES. Pate de foie gras patties. Fricassie of chicken. RELEVES. Roast saddle of mutton. Roast sirloin of beef. Boiled turkey. York ham. ROTI. Roast partridge. ENTREMETS. Apple charlotte. Fruit tarts. Wine jellies. Compote of fruit. French pastry. DESSERT. COFFEE. Dr. T. D. Griffiths, President of the Society, occupied the chair, and he was supported at the oross-table by Sir Wm. MacCormac, the guest of the evening, the Worshipful Mayor of Swansea IT R» -^ERON Thomas), Sir John T. D. LlewelyD, M.P., General Sir Hilles-Johnnes, V.C., Dr. Lynn Thomas (Cardiff), Chancellor Smith (Vicar of SWANSEA^ JJ Evans, J.P., Councillor Howel Watkins, Aid. Dr. Rawlings, Dr. Thomas Wallace and Dr. Edwards (Caroiff). There were also present :—Lieutenant-Colonel Wm. Jones, Dr. H. Rawlings, Mr. A. LI. Perkins, Mr. G. P. Francis, Mr. Augustus Lewis, Mr. John F. Harvey, Mr. D. Walter Rees, Dr. Graenway, Dr. R. Nelson Jones, Dr. Alex. Deas Davidson, Dr. John Bevan (Mumbles), Major O'Connell (R.A. M.C.), Mr. Henry Macdonnell, Mr. Henry J. Bath, Mr. F. Edwards, Mr. E. Austin Williams, Dr. Arnallt Jones (Aberavon), Mr. T. J. Willielus (Morilston), Mr. G. L. Morris (Sketty), Dr. D. Price (Swansea. Hospital). Dr. J. Gabe (Morris- ton), Mr. John White (Ben Evans and Co.. Swansea), Mr. D. Davies (editor Daily Post), Mr. E. Meredith Thomas, Mr. J. Lewis Jones. Mr. P. McRitchie, Mr. T. R. Ritson,Dr. J. S. H. Roberts, Dr. T. M. Jones Powell (Hafod), Dr. R. C. Elsworth, Dr. D. E. Evaus, Mr. Cornelias A. Griffiths (Cardiff), Dr. E. Le Cronier Lancaster, Dr. J. Kynaston Couch. Mr. Stephen Floyd (Llandrindod Wells), Dr. Edgar Evans, Mr. C. T. Pasmore, Mr. John Legg, Mr. W. D. Hughes, Mr. John D. Davies, Mr. E. Tenison Co'lins (Cardiff), Mr. George Nancarrow, Dr. E. B. Evans (St. Thomas), Mr. J. Thomas, Dr. D. A. Davies, Mr. F. rapier White, Mr. Owen Williams, Mr. R. G. Price, Mr. James Jones, Mr. D. Denvil Harris, Mr. D. Arthur Hughes, Dr. lid A. Stephens, Rev. E. W. Boluey, Dr. A. Lloyd Jones (Mumbles), Mr. H. G. Solomon, Mr. W. • Farr, Dr. A. F. Blagdoa Richards, Dr. A. W. Cameron, Mr. J. P. Jones Powell, Mr. Thomas Milward, Dr. F. Knight, Mr. H. J. Thomas, Mr. Francis Gerald Southern, Mr. C. H. Glascodine, Mr. J. Buckley Wilson, Mr. Glendinning Moxham, Mr. W. Laugharne Morgan, Dr. A. Lucas Morgan, Mr. Mclntyre, Mr. Frank G. Thomas Dr. Edgar Reid, Mr. Ronald E. Bill, Mr. Forbes C. Scott, Captain C. E. Eady, R.A., A Dr.. H. A. Latimer, Mr. E. H. Plant, Mr. Jas. Brown (editor The Cambrian), Mr. W. W. Moore (Western Mail), Mr. T. Rees (Daily Leader). The President felicitously submitted the USUAL loyal and patriotic toasts, and also "The Church, the Army, Navy and Reserve Forces," COUPL^ with the names of Chancellor Smith, Vicar of Swansea, and General Sir Hills-Johnes. Canon Smith responded in a brief and suitable speech. He likened the work of the clergy and medical profession, and said that between the two there should exist a spirit of concord and union. Both were seeking to live for the good of others -the one for the body, the other ior the soul. General Sir Hills-Johnes was loudly applauded on risiDg to respond. He said he was glad to be present on an occasion when they sought TO DO honour to a most distinguished member of THE medical profession. Sir WIll. MacCormae was a gentleman they all honoured, while the Queen and the great rulers of European powers ALSO delighted to honour him. (Applause.) Sir William had worked earnestly, loyally, and with brilliant success. He bad gone on to the field of battle to learn something of the profession of which he was so bright an ornament. Sir Hills- Johnes then referred to Britain's success in the Soudan. Dr. Horatio Rawiings gang "Hearts of Oak," the company joining heartily in the chorus. Mr. Frederic Edwards, the Swansea manager of the Capital and Counties Bank, in the unavoidable absence of Dr. Ebenezer Dayies, submitted Town and Trade of Swansea." He said he did not think he ever wished for the presence of Dr. Eben. Davies more than at the present moment. (Laughter.) And if he met him on the morrow ne felt he should be justified in committing an assault upon him. (.Laughter.) Trade was W A they all lived upon, and they should, tneielore, ° their best to promote it. (Hear, hear.) J- 0 trade of Swansea and district had recently UN(REL\ gone a somewhat severe dislocation. Iney na lost for all time a great amount of what was ON^E our staplj trade. He referred to the TIN-pi* e trade. He believed the Americans would deprive them OF what now remained in their possession. (No, no.) That was his opinion, It was their duty, therefore, to look for other trades, to provide facilities for new industries. (Hear, hear.) It was no use sitting still. ihey muat be up and doing, active, alert, and pro- gressive, and determined to leave nothing undone to secure new trades. They must keep the harbour not only up-to-date, but in advance of the times. (Applause.) The harbour was the heart ot Swansea. It drove the life-blood through the town. The harbour must be provided with accommodation for the biggest vessels afloat, and for the biggest in course ot construction. How was that to be brought about ? They must place good men on the Harbour Trust and Corporation. (Applause.) They must select men who knew how to be wise even in extravagance. (Laughter and applause.) When the Prince of Wales Dock was constructed some people said it was too big, that the harbour was too much in advance of the times. But they were mistaken. They should elect as representatives of the public men like their worthy Mayor (Mr. J. Aeron Thomas)-men who were above being influenced by political or sectarian feelings. (Applause.) Swansea should be first in the minds of those entrusted to look after the affairs of the town and port. Mr. Edsvards coupled with the toast the name of the Mayor, who, he said, had discharged his important office with rare dignity and tact, and to the satisfaction of the whole town. (Applause.) Indeed, he had filled the office in such a way that his successors would experience great difficulty in attaining the HI^H standard he had set. (Applause ) The toast having been drunk The Mayor, who was most cordially received responded. Ha thanked Mr. Edwards for the too flatteri isr things he had said about him. (No, no.) Well, he thought they were too flattering. He was pleased that a gentleman like Mr. Edwards had the ourage to come forward and say, amidst the many dismal wails and lamenta- tions, that the way to prosper was by being alive and up-to-date. He was encouraged by what Mr. Edwards had said. By virtue of his offiee Mr. Edwards was obliged to watch carefully the pros and cons of the different movements that take place in the town. His utterances, there- fore, could not receive too much consideration. He was sure of this Mr. Edwards would not say what he had said were he not convinced that he was in the right. After a humorous reference to the position of surgeons and barbers in the sixteenth century, the Mayor went on to say that he believed there was a vitality in the town and trade of Swansea that would produce highly encouraging results at no distant time. As Mr. Edwards had told them, the town was holding its own. The revenue of the Trust had increased during the past five or six years, notwithstanding the general depression in trade, and the shock they had received from their American cousins in the shape of the McKinley Tariff Bill. A little more co-operation, patriotism and sincerity would enable them shortly to make some very necessary and important street improvements, especially in regard to Castle-street. (Applause.) In con- clusion, the Mayor referred to Messrs. Weaver's Flour Mills, which, he said, had very materially contributed to the revenue of the Trust, turning a deficit into a surplus. That concern, of which he bad intimate knowledge, WAS due more to the initiation of his friend Dr. Griffiths than to any other man. (Applause.) HE sought friends all through the town to assist in starting the business. He called upon him (the Mayor) and was, in fact, a nuisance. Thanks to the assist- auce of Mr. Macdonnell and others, Messrs. Weaver and Co.'s concern was now a great success. It contributed to the prosperity of the town, and yielded the shareholders substantial dividends. (Applause.) The town needed half a dozen or so businesses of that sort. There was plenty of room for them, and men with capital and enterprise were needed to start them. (Ap- plause.) Dr. Blagdon Richards having given a recitation, The President submitted the toast of the even- ing, "Our Guest, Sir Wm. MacCormac." He said it was unnecessary for him to say anything by way of commending the toast (Hear, hear.) Sir William had been well known to them for many years, more particularly since 1870, when, being anxious to gain experience in military surgery he voluntered his services to the French Aimy. He was at Metz and Sedan, and the story went that he was actually up to his neck there in blood when operating on the wounded That was sufficient to tell them of what stuff he was made—the very best British metal. (Applause.) The first t'me he saw Sir William was in 1881, during the' international medical congress in London, when he accompanied the late Emperor Frederic of Germany to the platform. On that occasion Sir Thomas Paget delivered his memorable speech to an audience of over 2,000 doctors. He held the great gathering spell-bound for over an hour. They ^ad known Sir William since then not only as a distinguished teacher in surgery, but as one of the leading surgeons in England, and as an accomplished and foroible writer, and as one of the great pioneers in their profession. (Applause.) He^was one of the first to put into practice the principles evolved by the genius of Lord Lister in regard to antisceptic surgery, when nearly all the surgeons of London and the colleges elsewhere were opposed to him and he proved that Lister was right. Those principlea had become the greatest benefactors of the human race-(loud applause)-and were the dawn of a new era in the history of surgery, which had sirce made progress by leaps and bounds that had exceeded that of any other science. (Applause.) Sir Wdliam thus came to the front, and bad kept to the front, and he had been loaded with honours of all sorts- medals, badges, crosses, legions of honour, titles, and degrees enough to smother him or any other mortal. Yet tliere he was, without even the badge of the legion of honour. They were indebted to him and proud of his visit to Swan- sea. (Applause.) Being a pioneer in his profession, Sir Wiliiam was prepared to sacrifice a'most anything to help them. The medical men of Swansea would always remember that evening, and they all hoped to see their distinguished guest again. (Loud applause.) The toast was drunk with much enthusiasm, company singing with much spirit He's a 3, *y good fellow," Lady MacCormac's health also being drunk.. „ Wm. McCormac was loudly applauded ou to respond to the toast. He said the first thing be should do when he went home was to proudly tell his wife that her health was drunk Swansea because she had taken a great share his career, and he owed much of what he had done to her. (Applause.) Proceeding, he said he bad already addressed two audiences in Swansea. !lnd he thought they would feel, and he did most intensely feel that the prophet Daniel had the advantage of all their sympathy when he said, on a Memorable occasion, that at all events there was to be no after-dinner speech. (Laughter and aPplause ) He felt very much with Daniel; but be would say that he was very much touched and gratified by all be had heard and seen since he Caine to gwansea, and by the flattering allUsions made to his career. They knew £ hat he began life as a provincial surgeon, and supposed he was still more or less a provincial burgeon. But in spite of that fact, or perhaps by reason of it, he had reached a high position, Of Whih ha or anvone else jniarht have good rea80a '^0 be proud. He had every sympathy w*th tbem as provincial surgeons, and he wished Swansea Medical Society every success. He fcad been in Swansea but a short time, but that short time had been illumined b.v the conver- and association of their President (Dr. Notbinff could have been kinder or mor* hospitable, or more delightful than his con- rr8a^ons with Dr. Griffiths. So long as the SwanSea Medical Society was presided over by such men as it bad the goodfortune to possess, so ,0.n* would it flourish. Sir William concluded by wishiti™ the Society and its excellent President long ijf V~TJ „nntiued usefulness. The toast having been £ runk, the President R08PONCLED He THANKED the company and Sir McCormac, whose interesting speech they had itIF t Just been listening to. It was highly satis- factorv fn ho encouras-'ed by so^ eminent a man. No ON0 knew better than Sir William the value and NEED of Medical Societies, and no one did more to placa them on a solid foundation. Unity was STRENGTH Without unity the medical men of THIS countrv could NOT hope to do so much. Tho benefits which the medical societies sought to confer were fellowship, mutual advantages, and A PROPER recognition oi the duties and responsi- BDITIESOF the PROFESSION- (^-PP^lause.) In conclu- SI°n,Dr Priffiths referred to the consjience;clause °f the AMENDED Vaccination Act, and said it was A DISGRACE to the profession that they had not oppose it. He strongly advocated unity and sajd there were 50,000 lives which c°uld be «aved annually if the profession realised and Were allowed to carry out their duties in re- gard +1 fihle diseases. Sir TnF^T welyn. M.P., who submittal The Hospital Sid that for 80 years it had played an impL. 't r+ in the life of the community, and more tKa nf)0 persons had passed through the ^8thoa £ nfh'°0s0i He appealed for a large Urease of funds in the shape or annual 8ub- ACRiptioNS so that the efforts of the working coiamw!' ^ch bad increased its contribution misrht be properly supple, WONTED Referring to the Vaccination Act and E>r fiL^ cir John pointed out that the new dauS Jeqaired, and the law as it stood wa* i, hv Boards of Guardians, by Hosnitl?" lfr"?individuals, who said there existed conS t f- a objections to vaccination. While Sir Wnr plastly on the one hand> and Sir Walter ^amf on the other, advised the Local Govern TV>ard differently, he (Sir John) tl:^ghTtehUeG^rnment donp, ^ght thing in mfv v 1 conscientious objections legal, and S i? thf tbe trial of the new law would result! hoped ildren being vaccinated in the iutS™ ?wmO^0 te past because no one who did not n ?1 in, Mare his objections to be consci- entim iflspe the consequences of ignor- fntious, would f cacPonciasion, Sir John compli- mLfihf }r- Sical men upon the successful fun .F ^exim+ daV and proposed the health of the v °n ° l lairfflin of the Hospital Commit- tee M y CihSkins. (Applause.) ,M^ Howel Chairman of the Hospital B.f iment, responded iu a capital Kr ofManag ed to the practical and active 'UDoort Tsir J"hn Llewelyn extended to all ch»l v. VhlCh iments, and to the long and charitable MOVENT? ITFA SWANSEA F TH PEN?r S V B- Evans> by HIS maJ i £ ga0r+ "ft to the town, had greatly ENCOURAGED the KF PITAI COMMITTEE TO Per^vere

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NOTES.

"MUSICAL PEEPS INTO PEPYS."

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Comspontate.

To CORRESPONDENTS.

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SWANSEA MEDICAL SOCIETY.