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-----A SONNET ON SORROW.I

Uanettes, .&c.__,

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SOnITHING FOR YOUNG ' FOLKS.

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ST. DAVID'S DIOCESAN CONFERENCE.

BISHOP OF RIPON AT ALBERT…

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iTRIED AND PROVED.

[No title]

\ LITERARY BUREAU.

SWANSEA SCHOOL BOARD.

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SWANSEA HOSPITAL.

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BISHOP OF RIPON AT ALBERT…

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had their life and health in a perfectly horrible world' I do not believe it is true," the Bishop of Ripon exclaimed, and went on to admit that they lived in a world where the laws of nature were very hard laws that never let them off. If they entered the public-house and found their consumption was greater than their prudence he thought nature did not let them off with that head- ache. So it was if they wanted to succeed they must work-if they wanted to be healthy they must deny themselves. That was nature, but his impression was that nature never let them off-but nature was wise. (Hear, hear.) The parent that let the child off was not always the wise parent. Was it wise to bring the boy up with the idea that he could evade the consequences of his own wrong-doing P But then it was said, "But, oh it a question of the smr- vival of the fittest." That was the driving out of the weaker race, but it did not mean the clearing of the brain of the world, and men like Pascal and Pope somehow survived, though not in the sense that they had as long lives as their brother-men, but they survived in memory of the world, and their names were consecrated powers of posterity. Another thing that did not always survive was the good man-the man who could not get on in the world because he was too honest. But goodness, too, had a power of self-preservation; good men lived, and their example was a perpetual sermon in the world. The law of survival did not, as Christ told them, always mean the law of escaping the penalties which waited upon those who transgressed nature's laws. Nay, the whole story of the growth of religious life was a struggle over this very problem, Why did the righteous man suffer ? till, at last, in the inspiration of the Prophet Ezekiel, men saw that there was a marvellous discerning power when a man would say, I am willing to suffer if humanity can be beneiftted lsy it. (Applause.) In the most elegant language, that at times was full of the deepest pathos, his Lordship alluded to the many gifts of nature-sunshine and rain —the love of home, of wife—" that patient soul waiting for your return"—and of friend- ship—which humanity received all for nothing." What he wanted to say, then, he added, was that religion was not a mere appendix of life-but it was a reality. Had he not said enough ? Character was the supreme thing for man, and he saw it in its I perfection in Jesus Christ-the flower of manhood—the standpoint of our dream of what humanity might be. "You are the sons of God, and God is your Father," his Grace concluded, "I and therefore in this world He will deal with you as a son, and your joy will be if only you can say in response to him, Abba—Father.' For us, everything will work for good if you but realise that one thing, and not in this world, which some of us sometimes think so hard, and in which we get nothing for nothing, but in the other world we shall see that we get everything for nothing, for behold He spared not His Own Son, but gave him up for us all, and gives to us in the bounty of His love the thing that was nearest that He might draw us the nearer to Himself—that we, standing here upon this poor little world with its strange laws and with our ignorance of life, might begin to understand that we are not forsaken beings upon this earth, but that we are loved by an eternal love and watched over by an eternal care, inspired by the constantly outpouring Spirit, so that here you might see that religion is not a thing that I put on with my Sunday clothes, but 11 a thing that is in the home with my wife and children-God by my fireside. (Applause.) The religion I mean that has God with me in the street and at the corner of the street where the temptation comes, and God with me not merely when I am kneeling, but when I am thinking-in Him to breathe and have my very being- understanding what life is. As the skylark rises up to its world and knows that it is bathed round about with the air of heaven, and there can move upwards, so my soul, bathed in that pure, constant and undying love of God, may yet mount upwards aspiring after something noble, making me to be in this world what God meant me to be—a son on His earth, to serve Him right, to serve Him unto death, showing forth in some small degree that love wherewith my Father hath loved me." (Loud and continued applause.) The address was listened to with deep attention. The vast audience hung upon almost every word that fell from the great orator's lips. It was a brilliant, eloquent address, and its delivery was magnificent. Those who heard it will not soon forget it. After the applause had subsided, The Archdeacon of Carmarthen moved a vote of thanks to the Bishop of Ripon. Mr. C. H. Glascodine seconded, and it was carried with acclamation. A vote of thanks was also accorded the Lord Bishop of St. David's for presiding, and the meeting came to a close. On Sunday last the Very Rev. the Dean of Bristol and the Lord Bishop of St. David's preached at St: Mary's Church, and on Wednesday evening the Rev. W. H. Barlow, oftii°Ms''n^on' On Sunday next, October 30th, the Lord Bishop of Llandaff and the Lord Bishop of Bath and Wells will preach at the Parish Church on Wednesday, Nov. 2nd, the Rev. G. R. Thornton, Vicar of i -rrarnabas, Kensington; and on Thursday the very Rev. the Dean of St. David's.