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-----A SONNET ON SORROW.I

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SOnITHING FOR YOUNG ' FOLKS.

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SOnITHING FOR YOUNG FOLKS. (BY COUSIN KATE.) ] QUESS WILHELMLNA AND THE WASHER- WOMAN. In an article in the October St. Nicholas on WTlhelmina, Queen of Holland," the writer says: The young QJeen has—necessarily more than other children—always had a good many '■ lessons to learn, a good many tasks to perform, 3. good many duties to go through; but she has had her holidays as well as other children, and certainly enjoyed them quite as much. She, of ) course, particularly likea the Christmas holidays, and the pleasant surprises they brought with them, and one cf her special pleasures was to prepare a Christmas-tree for an elderly court lady, of whom she was very fond. The winter of 1S95 made no exception to the rule. Queen Wilhelmina's old friend was, under some pretext or other, induced to go out. Her retrfuring footsteps were eagerly listened for; then the girl Queen of fifteeji years gave strict orders that no one-no one—should interrupt her or enter the room while she was busy with the trea. The lackeys bowed low, and promised obedience; the tree and the decorations and the presents were carried into the old lady s room; then the Queen, left alone, began to work. She had been busy for some time, now and then standing on tiptoe to fasten a bright bit of orange ribbon on a higher branch of the tree, whon there was knock at the door. With indignant eves the Queen-looked up, or rather looked down, from the tree to the door. Who was it that dared trouble her, contrary to her most positive commands ? She knitted her brows, and went on with her work, feigning not to have heard the knock. Surely they would not dare to repeat it? Hark! there it was again. It was too bad! She quickly walked up to the door, opened it a very little bit. and asked im- patiently "Why did you knock ? Who is it ? The answer was given without the least hesitation. "It ij me. the washerwoman." The waslwnyoman Queen Wilhelmina was perplexed. She did not wish anyone to see the tree, and could not send for the court lady, or any of her attendants. So, opening the door, j she said kindly: Well, come in and put down the basket, but don't look around." The woman did as she was told. See never seen the Queen of Holland, and she feft perfectly at ease in the presence of this young girl, almost a child, who was very simply dressed in some dark woollen winter material. "Good afternoon,mif,sy," she said. "Where shall I put the things Put them ? Has the basket to be unpacked ? "Why, of course it has, missy. That is always done." indeed! Then put the things some- where, and make a little haste, please." The woman nodded and obeyed. When the basket was empty, she handed the Queen a bit of paper, and said "You will see that the things on this list are all there, won't you, missy?" "Missy "began to enjoy the joke. She con- sulted the list. and counted the things to see that all was correct. Then she said kindly: "It is all right. You can go now." But the washerwoman was not satisfied. "Go?" she repeated indignantly. "No, indeed, I shan't go. I'll be paid first. The lady always pays me directly." "Does she really?" asked the Queen. "Indeed she does. You can ask her, if you like." The Queen saw that she would have to act her part of "missy" to the end. She found the situation amusing, and, casting down her laughing eyes, she took out her purse, and counted the money into the laundress's hand. "That's all right, and thank you kindly," the woman said, taking up her basket, and going to the door. Then, with a glance at the half- decorated Christmas tree, she added good- naturedly: "And I wish you much pleasure. Good-bye, missy." A gay, musical laugh rang- through the room when "missy" was alone again. Her Majesty the Queen of Holland was, indeed, not accustomed to be addressed by that unpretending title. How her sympathetic mother must have smiled with pleasure when the tree was ready, and the Queen of fifteen years ran away to tell her what had happened! A "TOP" COAT. "Papa," said Willie, "why did you buy a golf coat?" "To play golf in, my son," said Mr. Willie. "Did you need it?" "Of course I did." Then I need a top coat >to play tops in. I seen m'1II advertised." A LITTLE HERO. During a storm on the Yorkshire coast, a smack was washed ashors, and in the morning was seen by the coastguard. The crew were obliged to take to the rigging. Very soon the rocket apparatus was in requisi- tion, and a line shot across the stranded vessel, by means of which two of the crew were quickly urought to shore. As it came to the turn of a lad to enter breeches buoy, he heard a piteous mew bi- the smack's cat, and, looking, aft, he saw tnt head of poor pussy just peeping out of the cabin funnel. The smack was full of water, and the cat had climbed up the chimney as her only means of escape. It was no small risk to leave the rigging, where the lad ha.d lashed himself but, seizing an opportunity between the waves which washed the deck, he ran aft, put poor pussy, all black, inside his guernsey, with her head just under his chin, took his place in the buoy, and so the boy and the cat were drawn on shore. He risked his own life to save the life of a cat. WHAT A KITE DID. Which of us does not know the joy and exulta- tion of watching a kite soar up into the sky until it looks like a tiny bit of fleecy clouds? That is a real, and a keen pleasure—but it is cnlv a pleasure. Once on a time a kite was the means of doing a wonderful thing. When it was proposed to build a bridge over Nigara, the great difficulty to be faced was how to span it ? Some thoughtful mind solved the difficulty. A kite was sent afloat on the breeze, the end of its "tail" being held secure on the one side. When the kite sailed down at the other side of Niagara, the string—to which a stronger had meanwhile been fastened—was drawn across. And so it went on—the men on one side fastening a stronger and stronger line, and those on the opposite side drawing it across, until they gat to a heavy rope, and thus to actual chains. By degrees the line strengthened. So one effort following another accomplishes great things. God gives us the "kite" of a pure, true thought. Let us fasten to it the line of earnest purpose to work it out—the determination to follow that pure, true" kite" of thought, will carry the stronger line of a resolute, open action and that action repeated by a bolder, firmer, stronger still until action grows into continual deeds, deeds into the chains of habit, habit into character, and character builds up the massive superstructure of true manhood, the noble bridge which spans the rushing, roaring torrent of life's difficulties, temptations, dangers, and troubles —and all led on by the little "kite" of one pure, true thought, bravely followed by the trembling line of an earnest resolve. fi. SCHOOLROOM SKETCHES, a.llhstory with a touch of romance in it is memo8- -an interesting subject. It is the orrtinJl8.1"^ dates, facts, and names that tne One^boy detests. of her eF great difficulty in making one ColurnbuPIS remember that the date of would of America was 1492. He composed the folW lm~ She therefore •4fo«iSzs/re,orhil°' Columbus crossed tL mn^ty-t*r- Next day she Sut7a Ue-r u >■ In fourteen hundred rhyme" Columbus crossed the deep bfue se?" sang out the hoy, and the teacher nearly fainted ] boys, 3he questI<med ag. h I Columbus r am, w 0 was Thi3 J^uTh* man St-3^ ^til she j prompted, "The man tnat-— ] Broke the bank at Monte Carlo!» san„ out J several voices simultaneously. san^ out ] Examining a class in the history of Robert the Bruce, and having exP' Position of Brace's army at Bannockburn, she put the qU"Pitsnw6re dug in front. Now, what were the ] pits filled with ? Only one little fellow volunteered to answer. "Well, Jamie?" "TclttlGS It is obvious to be seen that Jamie had some connection with the farm.. c* Another juvenile, when reading in his Scottish history an account of the battle of Bannockourn, came to the following sentence "And when the English saw the new army on the hill behind, their spirits became damped. "What is here meant by damping their spirits ? the teacher asked. Evidently the boy did not comprehend the jneaning of the phrase, for he simply remarked; "Puttia' water in the whiskey."

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ST. DAVID'S DIOCESAN CONFERENCE.

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