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LIFE AND ADVENTURES IN GOWERLAND.

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INATIONAL MUSICAL ASSOCIATION…

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ITHE" DEVIL" TAKE IT ! OB,…

|FRANCES RIDLEY HAVERGAL.

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FRANCES RIDLEY HAVERGAL. SOME INTERESTING LOCAL REMINISCENCES, — In this mouth's Oou»ecr»i.H>n, a monthly magazine (oc the culture of the spiritual life, for fellowship, tettimooy and service," there appears a brief sketch of Frances Ridley Havergal. together with a portrait of this excellent authoress, "whose praise is in all the churches." Miss Havergal is known wherever the English language is spoken, and a more devoted Christian, a more unobtrusive chaiacter, and a more chaste alJd chastened spirit it would be bard to find iu the Church of this century. Her memorable consecration hymn is ever a f«vourite with those who are spiritually- minded," of whatever comiuuuion they may be. And while the ideal of that beautiful hymn is very high, it should never be forgotten that the whole is a figure of desire and aim, and not a declaration or assertion of attained experience or subjective realisatiou. Frances Ridley Havergal was born in 1837, in the rural village of Ashley, Worcestershire, where her father was Rector. Sbe was tenderly and lovingly brought up under religious training, surrounded by everything calculated to foster the beut of her mind in literary pursuits, and was regarded by the family as the choice spirit of the household." Miss Havergal was passionately fond of couutry and seaside life, aud spent some of her most pleasant days at Caswell B .y. Here she lodged with her sister at Park Villa, and during her stay there displayed thut gentle Christian spirit which endeared her to all who came in contact with her. She always had a word to say for her Master, aud waxed eloquent when she pointed out to some wayward person His loving kindness and mercy, and His power to saVø all sinners. Whilst at Caswell she had occasion to speak 10 a servant-man about his unruly tongue, and while her teachingll and pleadings did not seem to religiously affect him, be was always careful to restrain himself in her presence. Oneeveamg, however, some pigs got astray, aud wandered on to the front lawn. He went in search of them, and on finding ttiem attempted to drive them back to the yard. But his efforts were in vain. He became very much irritated, and he gave vent to rather unseemly expressions. At last be looked round for help, when he espied a female form in the front window of the heuse. Waving his hand to her, he shouted out, "Why the Beeliebub don't you come and help me with these blaming, flaming pigs? Quick. Jane, come!" He evidently mistook the figure for oue of the servants, and he waited to see what effect his entreaties would have. Imagine his surprise when the window was raised aud Miss Havergal stepped on to the lawn. She wore a pained expression on her face, and laying her band on the man's shoulders said, sadly, "I am sorry you have not yet given up the bad habit of sweariug." The poor fellow looked completely abashed. He hung his bead, and played with his cap. At last be blurted out, I am sorry, too, miss. I did not know 'twas you I was calling." Looking tenderly and pitifully at him, she said. It does not matter so much about me; but why will you swear?" Her mauner so overcame the waywaid servant, that he answered that he would never swear again. ♦

ST. PATRICK'S GRAVE DESECRATED.

IGAS AND ELECTRIC LIGHTING.