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FA.',.IMEr,.S' COLUMN.

JUNE GARDENING.

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JUNE GARDENING. In a considerable measure the crops will now take care of themselves, and we may consider the chief anxieties and activities of the season over. Our notes, therefore, will now be more brief. But we do not counsel the cultivator, to rest and be thankful," for it is better for him to work, but he must be thankful all the same if he would be happy in his healthy and enter- taining employment. Watering and weeding are the principal labours of this month, and both must be pursued with diligence. Where systematic irrigation with sewage can be carried on, the most wonderful results maybe expected, but ordinary watering, where every drop has to be dipped and carried, is often injurious -rather than beneficial, for the simple reason that it is only half done. In such cases we should advise the cultivator to abstain from giving water as long as possible, and then to give it in abundance, watering only a small plot every day in order to saturate the ground, and taking a week or more to go over a piece which would be done in a day by mere surface dribblings. —Asparagus should not be cut after the 20tli. Manure water will do great things for Asparagus now, and a dressing of salt may be given with advantage.—Beans may yet be sown, but as they are not much in request in the latter part of the season, a small sowing will probably suffice. -Broccoli to be planted out at every opportunity. In the first week sow for cutting next April and May.—Cabbage Towards the end of the month sow a good breadth of small cabbages and coleworts. They will be immensely valuable to plant out as the summer crops are cleared aiviy.-Ctuliflo,.vers to be sown now where they are to remain, and of course to be thinned to a proper distance in due time. Any that are planted out now from seed-beds must have water, and be shaded during the mid-day for a week—Celery to be planted out without loss of time, in showery weather if possible, but if the weather is hot and dry, shade and give water. Pea-sticks laid v across the trenches will give shade enough with very little trouble.—Cucumbers for pickling may be sown on ridges Kidney beans Dwarfs and runners should still be sown for late use.—Lettuce to be sown and planted at every opportunity. A few rows of large cos variety should be sown in trenches pre- pared as for celery, and there be thinned and allowed to stand. They will form tine hearts, and be valued at a time when lettuces are scarce,—Onions to be sown for salading. Forward beds of large sorts to be thinned in good time. The best onions for keeping are those of moderate size, perfectly ripened therefore severe thinning of such sorts as Improved Reading, James s, Blood Red, and Danver's should be avoided.—Peas may still be sown. The second early sorts will pay well if the season is favourable, but the first earlies will be more sure, as one or two showers will carry them through to maturity. See note on peas in calendar for last month.—Turnips may be sown in variety and in quantity after Midsummer Day. It is a good plan to sow on •well prepared ground, and to put a sprinkle of artificial manure in the drills with the seed. By hastening the early growth of the plant the fly is kept in check in fact, it is as a rule only the plantation starved by drought or on an ill-prepared soil that the fly islikely to destroy outright. -Slittoll's (Heading) Guide.

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