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FROM THE PAPERS. The official declaration of the poll at the Oxford Univer- sityelection was made by the Vice-Chancellor, on Friday, May 17, as follows Talbot, (C.), 2,687; Smith, (L.), 989. Four of the six persons in custody charged with the murder of the Earl of Leitrim and his clerk and driver, were on Friday, May 17, committed for trial. Anthony and Michael M'Granaghan were discharged. An exhibition of art treasures was opened in Manchester on Thursday, May 16th. The Bishop of Manchester and Cardinal Manning were both present, and spoke on the importance of art culture.. A Pall Mall Gazette • Berlin telegram states :— It is settled that no new law respecting Socialism will be pro- pused in Parliament, but stringent police measures will be ordered." • The Daily News hears that the scrutiny m connection with the double return for South Northumberland will take place in about six weeks' time, and that Mr. Justice Field will be the presiding judge. MonsigneurDupanloup's pamphlet on Voltaire has been issued. He says Voltaire was the opposite of a Democrat, the toady of nobles, princes, kings, and kings mistresses, and he denounces the centenary as an act of jvar and an insult to the religious faith of France, which Catholics are bound to resent. n Two election petitions have been presented at the Com- mon pleas Rule office of the High Court of Justice, from South Northumberland, one against the return or Mr. Ridlev, and the other against the return of Mr. Grey. it is not alleged that there have been any corrupt practices a scrutiny of the votes is all that is sought. The point, reserved at the recent conviction of Morris Roberts for perjury at the Central Criminal Court as to there being no proper evidence before the jury or the ap- pointment of the deputy-judge of the County Court before whom he swore, was argued on Saturday, May lo, in the Court of Crown Cases Reserved. The Court amrined the conviction. i The Select Committee on Turnpikes recommends that, owing to a delay in passing the Highway Act, provision should be made this session in the Turnpike Act Continu- ance Act, empowering Quarter Sessions to place upon the county rate, so far as they think fit, the mainten- ance of roads from which turnpikes have been taken since 1870.. An extraordinary accident has happened in London. A child, sent out in a perambulator, had a long white silk scarf tied round his neck. One end of this scarf became entangled with the axle of the perambulator, and was pulled tighter and tighter as the vehicle was wheeled on. The nursemaid who was pushing the perambulator did not notice the accident till deceased was black in the face with strangulation, and he died a few minutes after being set free. The scarf had been drawn so tight that it had cut' deeply into the flesh of the neck and drawn blood. The Volunteer force is to be allowed to join the camp of exercise, which is to be held at Aldershot next July: while consolidated and administrative regiments may If represented for the short period of eight days or the full term of sixteen, detachments of corps, not less than sixty men, may join. The Government, in addition to defray- ing 'all expenses to and from the camp, and providing equipment and messing, will also credit regiments at the rate of 10s. per man for a period of eight days. It is anticipated that about 8,000 men will attend the camp. Applications for relief on the part of wives of men belonging to the army reserves who have been recently called out have been regarded by several Boards of Guar- dians as special cases, with reference to which they would be glad to have special instructions from the Local Govern- ment Board. That Board has, however, intimated that they do not intend to issue any general regulations on the subject, as it appears to them that the well-understood principles of poor-law administration will be found, if judiciously and carefully applied, sufficient to enable Guar- dians to deal satisfactorily with all applications of the kind. According to the regulations which have just been issued with reference to the allotment of prizes at the Paris Exhibition, it appears that a sum of £62,500 has been apportioned for the purpose, and that the prizes will be conferred by an international jury, consisting of 750 members. The work of this body will commence on the 1st June, and its awards will be made by the 1st of Sep- tember, the prizes, including upwards of 21,000 medals, being distributed on the 10th of the same month. Josh Billings" (Henry W. Shaw) is reported (says the New York Times) to have made more money than almost any American author by persistent working of his peculiar vein of humour. Some years he has got 4,000 dollars from a weekly newspaper fo& his exclusive.contributions has made 5,000 or 6,000 dollars by lecturing, and has had a profit from his Almanack of 8,000 dollars or 9,000 dollars more—18,000 dollars to 20,000 dollars per annum. That is five or six times as much as Emerson, Hawthorne, Lowell, or Holmes has ever made. An application was made to the Master of the Rolls, on Saturday, May 18, on behalf of the Rev. F. Besant, to re- move out of the custody of his wife, Mrs. Annie Besant, their daughter Mabel, aged eight years, and place her under the care of her father. The grounds of the applica- tion were that Mrs. Besant entertains atheistical opinions and peculiar views on the population question. The Master of the Rolls granted the application, expressing strong disapproval of the conduct of the mother. The Huddersfield borough magistrates have just given a most extraordinary interpretation of that portion of the Licensing Act which applies to the bon& fide traveller. Four men were summoned for drinking in a public-house during prohibited hours on a Sunday afternoon. Three of them were con- victed, but the magistrates held the fourth to be a bona fide traveller, although, like the others, he lived within two miles of the inn, because on the previous night he had slept at a distance of three miles from the public-house. He had, however, breakfasted and dined at home. A young man named Hooper, employed as clerk in a solicitor's office, at Bath, was engaged with a fellow clerk in storing books in a strong room of limited dimensions, and nearly filled with documents of value. The room was fire-proof and air-tight. The two clerks were jesting, and Hooper declined to come ouj; of the room. The other clerk, in fun., slammed the massive iron door, intending to shut him in for a moment or two. When, however, he tried to open the door all his efforts to do so ^failed, and so did these of a. locksmith, subsequently called in.. The prisoner was suffering to a dangerous extent from want of air, and a hole was bored through the 3-feet-thick wall to admit it. Hooper remained a prisoner for 3: hours before he coR-ld be liberated. American papers bring news of the death of John Morrissey, pugilist, gaming-house-keeper, congressman, and senator. "He appears, by all accounts, says the Pall Mall Gazette, to have been a very worthy man. He had his nese .completely smashed by one Sullivan at an early stage of his career; but this "did not prevent him from beR.1ting Heenan in a tough fight, which Morrissey won by staying capacity. As the founder of Saratoga races and a munificent supporter of that watering place he gamed a wide popularity. He died an opponent of Tam- many, and his memory will evidently be cherished as that of an able and energe' ic supporter of American institu- tions. Mr. Morrissey was, as his name would indicate, an Irishman. Lord Rosebery presided on Saturday, May 18, at the annual meeting of the Sunday Society, which is agitating for the opening of museums and art galleries. In" a very temperate, but forcible address, his Lordship pointed out the great necessity which exists for the Accomplishment of fhareform which this Society advocates. He thought thr.t if the Puritan plan, which made the Sabbath a period; of .vacancy varied by drinking, were altered, it would be. for the better. People could not be at churcfe all day, and ? what were they to do to fulfil the Sabbatarian idea of rest ? (I The shutting of museums and art galleries was a grave; waste of opportunity, and a grave national Letters, expressing approval of the object in view were read from, Earl Granville, the Bishop of Exeter, the Duke of West- minster Professor Fawcett, and others. It was agreed to; reouest the Premier .to receive a deputabwn from the Society, and a resolution was passed praymg the Royal Academicians to open their collection one or two Sunday afternoons this season. The Emperor William has addressed the faSowmg lettar to Frince Bismarck The act of a man Mien into e\ ways, who attempted to take my life, which has long been protected by the merciful dispensation ot .LItè-. vidence, has been the occasion of uncommonly numerets manifestations of fidelity and affection towards my pers<>&, whereby .1 have been deeply moved and k-eartily gma- dendl. From the whole of Germany, as wed a"? fj-oEi many places abroad, from public authorities, corporations, associations, and private individuals of all classes of nocse-y and all ages, I have received, proofs that the heart of ike people is with its emperor and king, tiiAt it fe6!s with rhiip both in joy and sorrow. I same dealing herein every -eye into which I gazed after this essent, and I am indeed.deeply and warmly moved by the werthy and elevated maimer in which the Berlin popu- lation displayed their sympathy with me. I desire that each oÐwho showed me thaa. sympathy shall know tkati:e thereby (did my heart good, and I commission you with that i object to make this communication public." The result of the poll at Reading is an emphatic declar- ation against the war policy of-the Government—Mr. Pal- mer, th-e 'Liberal and peace candidate, being returned ibyt; 2,223 votes, against 1,565 given his Conservative and Ministerial opponent, Mr. Atienborough. This is the;, more significant (remarks the Birmingham Post) because;! the contest was bought out mainly on the peace question, and becaKse. the «tmast possible .efforts were mxde, not. merely locally,■ bat through external influence, to obtain a: vote in favour of Ministers. It acay be said that the Lib-1 erals have only in keeping a seat which was > theirs before but, so far aA the fv^eign policy of the Government iis concerned, this is not -frke case, for the late member, Sir I'. Goldimid, though a Liberal, was a strong advocate of the Ministerial policy iw the Eastern question, and was one the 'few Liberals who actually voted with Ministers in tJie ditfiaiens which have taken place upon it. The Paris oarreepondent of The Times, in noticing the Japanese seeti«n at the Paris Exhibition., says:—"No nation is a more interesting study than the Japanese in Its advance towards modern civilization, It was one of tke peoples most averse from the introduction of the European element, most obstinate in guarding itself against the danger art a foreign conquest; but when it on perceived that the exaasple and contact of European coulitries were essential to Itts welfare, Japan eatered on the pith of reform with a resolve which accounts for the rabidity of its progress. What is still more strange, the Japanese have borrowed numberless ideas and theories from European civilization without adopting any of their defects or iacrificing any of their excellences. In Europe, as at home., they are intelligent., /sober, modest, and grateful for any attentions, aild they are still, M formerly, very patriotic; at all the Exhibitions they have elicited admiration by their pmutuality, precision, and respectful compliance with orders.. On the morning of the 1st of May their section was quite finished, and i- has already drawn forth warm praise. It contains no- thing vulgar, nothing, or scarcely anythjogj which does not bear the stamp of natural taste,'

FACTS AND FANCIES.^^ "'.......,-...rv'\.f'V"\.."'\.r".,..,_.........................,-.......-...

FROM LONDON LETTERS.

^S^KING OF CHAPMAN'S ENTIRE…

ECCLESIASTICAL.

. SHELLEY IN WALES.

. MR. OSBORNE MORGAN ON THE…

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