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POTATO PLANTING. j

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POTATO PLANTING. Potato planting is now being proceeded with, and a few sug- gestions as to how the work should be done or performed with the object of securing a good crop may not be considered out of place. It is of great importance to plant early, and to plant not too deep. In no instance when planting in drills should the seert be below the level of the ground in an undrilled state the drills should be opened shallow not less than thirty inches wide. Light is all important to the well-being of plants. The sun's rays produce a vital action in the plant while their causes a chemical action to take place. Ilie leaves of the plant are its lungs, and if evaporation is prevented by too A. ins; land tops become too luxuriant, the conbti^tKm o tnL -n. 1"1 }\1('\ .f.A plant is thereby injured, and is, in consequence,iXred eviDor the stacks of disease. The want of suin, ™\chplnde'?'cl ipt?r" ation in crop 1877, will account for the £ °P 1 ™ Peculiar branchv, open leaves of the skeny blue potato will account for less" disease following that potato &.very^open- ness proving its greater vitality A very able write on the Potato disease," Robert 15ell, ihatit is o-enerifp?] hv says the most tenable opinion of all is, that itjs generated bj the invasion of a particular fungus, the Botiytis Infestans. This assertion he gives -with reserve. A^am, he observes, It 4 a noteworthy fact that the blight almost invariably com- mences in a low-lying part of a field, or in a locality which is enclosed by high hedegrows or trees, in other words, where ventilation is incomplete, or 111 a soil which is very moist. These circumstances indicate pretty clearly that a moist and stagnant atmosphere conduces to the growth of the fungus. Thin aLin we have the disease manifesting itself only after damn and cold summers, of which the summer of 1877 has been a most excellent example. We perceive then that the absence of solar rays a wet summer, a damp soil, and humid situations all conspire to produce debility in the plant, and simultaneously promote the health of the potato blight. The circumstances just must necessarily lower the vitality of the plant, and fulfil the conditions necessary to the production of the disease. The weak must succumb to the strong. To remedy this state of things, a wide drill or ridge, sets planted not less than twelve inches apart, the ground often scuffied and moulded up, and thus aid evaporation, give a better circulation of air and light, and the result will be satisfactory. "13 April, 1878. PRO BONO PuiiLico.

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