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--FARMERS' COLUMN.

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FARMERS' COLUMN. The number of live stock brought to Liverpool last week from America shows an increase over the previous week s arrivals; but in fresh meat there was a falling off. Four steamers reached the Mersev, bringing live oxen to the number of 631, besides -333 Canadian sheep. There were landed 2,178 quarters of fresh beef, and also 16 valuable horses. The Garden gays :-From the reports on Fruit Crops obligingly furnished by oitr correspondents, it will be seen that most kinds of fruits are this year a failure. Apples are m sonie few places a fair crop but they are thin generally. Pears and plums appear almost everywhere to be a f Jure. Wall fruits are also unsatis- factory, but in some districts there is an averagecrop of peaches and nectarines. The cause of failure in our fruit crops this year is by many attributed not wholly to the unfavourable. prin„ which we have experienced, but in a great measure to the sun- less autumn of last year, which was unfavourable to the perfect ripening of the wood. Small fruits of all kinds appear to be everywhere abundant, though in some cases inferior in qua itv. Apples are, however, the fruit which most concerns us, and al- though immense quantities may be expected from America the Prices will probably be very high. The reports we pnnt will be -of great value to fruit-tree planters, showing as they do the "kinds that succeed in cood and bad seasons alike, and under ■different conditions ana situations. r AGRICULTURAL REPORTS. — NORTH ALKS. July was throughout a wet month, and the hay saved then was brought to the stack after undergoing a great deal of manipulation. Those who were able to cut early in the latter part of June, had a fine opportunity of harvesting it in good order quickly, but since then until the 27th July, it was the exception to get a day Without some rain, more or less, and accordingly haymaking and saving occupied a protracted and anxious time. During the Past week it has been dry, and much has been secured during •his period in excellent condition. The mountain farmers are more fortunate than those in the vales this year so far as weather is concerned, but everywhere the crops are good, and in some place heavy. At this date on the high land all hands are busy, and are getting in their winter's fodder quickly, and in the low lands the work is all finished except a little here and there. It is most fortunate that the crop is a satisfactory one, as last year's stock was completely run out in the spring. Mowing and haymaking machines are pushing their way at last in this old- fashioned district, and the horse-rakes are seen almost on every little occupation. The haymakers are of infinite value here, where the weather is so fickle and treacherous, and labour so high. The oats are, as a rule, looking well, and the same may be said of the barlev. Wheat is grown to such a small extent that we can scarcely report it as a crop of importance, but the little that may be seen looks as if it would give a good yield at harvest time in a fortnight or three weeks. Potatoes have done well from the first, and unless they are attacked with the old disease, or the Colorado beetle, will turn out satisfactorily. Turnips had a bad start, but have wonderfully improved, and are a good plant, and the few mangolds we see are thriving Well. Store stock have had a full bite so far and are selling well The pastures have carried a good supply of keep, and although on the high lands it was very late in the spring before they showed much growth, yet the rapid advance under more Senial influences afterwards almost counterbalanced the long elay. In the gardens the frosts of the late spring and the cold easterly winds seriously damaged some of the fruit crops, and both plums and apples are very scarce. There was an abundance of blossom, and in many instances the young fruit was set only to be cut off by the biting frosts and cutting winds; pears, too, are similarly circumstanced. The other products of the garden are satisfactory.—Aug. 3. -Mark Lane Express.

THE COLORADO BEETLE.

. ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY…

THE POTATO CROPS OF 1877.

"---= MARKET REPORTS.

Trade Intelligence.

I LLANDTBSUL EISTEDDFOD,

. PRESENTATION OF THE AWARDS…

THE ST. ASAPH CHURCH EXTENSION…

. A DISAPPOINTED BRIDE.

MACHYNLLETH.

CORRIS.

ABERDOVEY.

BALA.

LLWYNGWRIL.

DOLYDDELEN AND VICINITY.

FFESTINIOG.

DOLGELLEY.

.BORTH.

BANGOR DIOCESAN MEETINGS.

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