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DEATH OF A WATERLOO VETERAN…

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DEATH OF A WATERLOO VETERAN AT MONTGOMERYSHIRE. During the last month a most noteworthy person, of the name of John Manuel, died at Llawryglyn, Trefeglwys, in his ninetieth year, He was born in the year 1782, and enlisted at Llanidloes in a militia party from Brecon, in the year 1798, being then in his seventeenth year. Ou the way to Brecon he was advised to return to his native place, as being, according to his outward appearance, a very unlikely person to do honour to the party which he had enlisted in. However, young John wai determined not to return, and followed them to Brecon, at which place a bounty of 230 was offered to him for joining the 79th Highlanders, which he at once accepted, and from which place they (the 79th) had orders to march for Scotland, and thence to Ireland, at the time when the rebellion of 1799 was on its decline. When their services were no more required there, they were ordered to Egypt in the year 1801, to be under the com- mand. of Sir Ralph Abercrombie, whose melancholy death as is so well-known, occurred during this period, when the French were expelled out of Egypt. After this, the regi- ment was ordered to the scene of the Peninsular war in Spain. Manuel was one of the regiment under the com- mand of Sir John Moore, who retreated to Corunna in 1809, retiring for sixty miles under the fire of the enemy. John Manuel was taken prisoner by the French, and was imprisoned for three years in the citadel of Briankon. At the termination of this period, he was exchanged and restored to his old regiment, the 79fch Highlanders. Shortly afterwards, we find the regiment marching for Waterloo, and Manuel fought under Picton against the bravest of the brave," Marshal Ney, in the battle of Quartre Bras. Picton fell within thirty yards of the sub- ject of these remarks, and soon afterwards John Manuel had a ball through his head, which passed from ear to ear, part of the left ear being taken off. He fell unconscious, and remained so durina the whole nf fbA nichf and in the morning found himself half covered with water in a ditch. A garden was close by; hunger induced him to help himself to a few gooseberries, which, being unable to bite, he squeezed between his fingers, and let the juice drop into his parched mouth. From this place he. with others who had met with a similar fate, made his way to Brussels, where he obtained medical aid. As soon as he felt himself able, he determined to leave for his home, where he was heartily welcomed as one of the brave men who had nobly fought for their country. He was loved and honoured until the day of his death, and his memory will long remain. His pension was Is. per day, and he received above 21,000.- Communicated.

THE ILLNESS OF THE PRINCE…

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- THE WEM CONTROVERSY.

- /A WHOLESALE MURDERFR 1ST…

LICHFIED DIOCESAN CHURCH EXTENSION…

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IMPORTANT CASE IN SHREWSBURY.