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THE ALLEGED OUTRAGES IN SERVIA.

THE WEATHER, THE CROPS, &c.

SINGULAR & FATAL ACCIDENT.

MR. HOMERSHAM COX ON HAPPY…

SAD RESULT OF A FAMILY QUARREL.

THE NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD OF…

THE LEPER OF AOSTE.

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CORRESPONDENCE.

THE FATHER OF WILSON, THE…

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THE FATHER OF WILSON, THE PAINTER. To the Editor of the Llangollen Advertiser." Sir,—I had occasion some weeks since to visit Penegoes, in Montgomeryshire, for the purpose, in fact, of examining the parish register with a view to ascertaining whether the book contained a record of the birth of the famous artist. I could iind none. The register, I may add, is not com- plete, some of the loaves being missing. I may, however, possibly throw a particle of light on the question raised in the "local column" of your last issue. I cannot precisely answer the inquiry as to the christian name of the incumbent of Penegoes in 1713; but the writer of the paragraph may be interested in the following extract from the register, copied at the time of my visit John Wilson, rector of this church, died 31st day of August, and was buried at Trefeglwys, 1728.—Thomas Griffiths, rector." A doubt has been raised respecting the locality of the artist's birthplace, and Mold (of which parish the elder Wilson was also rector) has been, among others, assigned the honour. It would be worth while to examine the registers of Mold respecting the matter. Should the writer in the Llangollen Advertiser be able to glean further information on the subject, he would, I believe, interest a large section of the community bv I making it public. I enclose my card, and am, sir, Yours faithfully, A WALES-LOVING ENGLISHMAN. Aberystwyth, Sept. 16th. THE BRITISH MUSEUM.—This institution, which occupies the northern side of the eastern portion of Great Russell Street, is far removed from all the other departments under the control of the Government, and is by far the most interesting of all to the people at large, though it can boast of no very great antiquity. It owes its origin to I γ- t, Sir Hans Sloane, a man of high scientific attain- ments, who, during a long period of practice as a physician, had accumulated at his house at Chelsea, in addition to a considerable library of books and manuscripts, a vast collection of objects of natural history and. works of art. These treasures he directed to be offered to the nation at a certain price after his death, which took place in the year 1753. The offer was accepted, and an act was passed directing the purchase, not only of Hans Sloane's collection, but also of the Harleian Library of Manuscripts, which we have already mentioned in a previous chapter and at the same time enacting that the Cottonian Library, which had been presented to the nation by Sir John Cotton, during the reign of William III., and was deposited in Ashburn- ham House, Dean's Yard, Westminster, should, with those, form one general collection. To these George III. added a large library, collected by the preceding sovereigns since Henry VII. To accomodate the natural property thus ac- cumulated, the Government raised, by lottery, the sum of £100,000, of which £20,000 was devoted to the purchase of the above collections and in 1854 Montagu House, in Great Ilussell-f street, was bought from the two heiresses o the Montagu family, as a repository for the then infant establishment.—From Old and New London" for September.

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[PRESS ASSOCIATION TELE&RAMS.j

-.-THE MARKETS.

Family Notices

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SHOCKING ACCIDENT.

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NARROW ESCAPE OF THE QUEEN.

RELIGIOUS LESSONS FROM THE…