Hide Articles List

45 articles on this Page

OUR LONDON LETTER

News
Cite
Share

OUR LONDON LETTER [FUOM OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENTS.] LONDON, FRIDAY. THE REAL CABINET-MAKERS. One of the most extraordinary stories in •eolation 18 that the real makers of the new ~*binet are Mrs. Gladstone, her daughter (Mrs. Brew), and Mr. Armistead. Mr. Armistead,itis well known, takes an affec- tionate interest in Mr. Gladstone, and treated him to his southern excursion last winter. ■Moreover, Mr. Armistead was visited by Mr. Mrs. Gladstone soon after the return of n t. -^reniier after seeing the Queen at Osborne on Monday. THE QOEEM AND MR. LABOUCHBRE. Another queer story concerns the alleged refusal of the Queen to accept Mr. Labouchere a member of her Government. Her Majesty is reported to have said, What •J-hat man, who has been abusing me and my *»nrily all these years Not if 1 know it." -piis is not the Queen's English. If her ■Majesty said anything of the sort it would llot be in those words, for she is precise, not to say pedantic, in her use of language. Moreover, her Maiesty could not have refused to accept Mr. l-abouchere, because his name "as never submitted to her. Mr. Gladstone declined to accept the responsibility of placing Mr. Labouchere's name before the Queen. .^hat is his version. It really means that the Premier did not want Mr. Labouchere, and "ould not have him. And the real cause of Mr. Labouchere's exclusion is the article in 1'ruth. MR. LABOUCHERE'S AMBITION. Strange as it may seem, the ambition of the member for Northampton is not to be a Minister of State, but a Privy Councillor. His desire to get into the Cabinet is only the means to an end, for Cabinet Ministers have of necessity to be Privy Councillors. A Minister rises and falls, but once a Privy Councillor is always a Privy Councillor. No one can imagine why Mr. Labouchere should have this violent desire to write Right Honourable in front of his name. He is the last man one would imagine to have an ambi- tion of that sort. Anyhow, present failure has not damped his ardour, and he vows that he will die a Privy Councillor. No one wants Mr. Labouchere to die, and no one wants him to be a Privy Councillor. Therefore, there is general desire that his interesting double svent be postponed. A MARKED EIBDKE. In the scramble after the loaves aud fishes the dignified and marked rebuke adminis- tered to Mr. Gladstone by Sir Lyon Playfair and Mr. Stanfrfeld has escaped notice. These two statesmen, who are each ten years youuger than Mr. Gladstone, declined to accept office ou the ground of their age. The irony of the refusal lies in the hint that if they at seventy-two and seventy-three feel unfit for office, how much more unfit must Mr. Glad- stone be in his eighty-third year ? TEN DISSOLUTION HONOURS. The list of dissolution honours issued this ttiorning is regarded as quite a moderate one, considering the six years' arduous labour Lord Salisbury's followers have undergone. No one will grudge the advancement of Lord Zetland to a marquessate, or of Lords Cran- brook and Willoughby de Kresby to earldoms. All the new peers are notable men, who will adorn the station to which they are called. They are all possessed of brains, dignity, and wealth. Mr. Cubitt is the head of the family who are the doyen of the great building firms. Tbe reputation of Cubitts is unrivalled in bricks and mortar. In the advertisement lJf sales of house property in London one often sees, as a last temptation to purchasers, Cubitt-built." What could be more signincant ? Sir Kainald Knightley's ancestors have sat in Parliament for Northamptonshire for hundreds of years. Of the others, Mr. Mulholland and Mr. Rolls, who has fought so gallantly for a seat in Monmouthshire, are alone unexpected. The five new Privy Councillors are eminently repre- sentative of the ideal in politics. Lord Chief 1 aron Palles and Mr. Staveley Hill for law, Sir Matthew White Ridley for statesman- ship, Mr. Jesse Collinps for patriotism, and Professor Huxley for science are, indeed, good types. Journalism flourishes among the baronets. We all rejoice that Sir Edward Lawson has accepted a baronetcy. As the head of the. Dmly Telegraph and president of the Institute of Journalists he is one every pressman delights to honour. Captain Armstrong, of the Globe, and Sir John J affray, of the Birmingham Post, represent the two wings of Unionist journaiism. tSurpnae is expressed that Sir John Blundell Maple's name should appear among the knights. It is thought that at least a baronetcy should have been his. It is not for lack of apprecia- tion that he figures in the minor honours, for I know that the chiefs of the party regard his services with extraordinary gratitude. MR. KEIR HARDIK. Mr. Keir Hardie's extraordinary garb in Parliament is merely a theatrical display of sartorial get-up. His cloth cap, coster's muffler, and rough clothes are put on for the occasion. When he was at the Trades Union Congress he turned out quite a swell. In his photographs, too, he appears clothed and in his right mind with an ample linen colour, white shirt front, and conventional scarf. Properly attired he is not a bad-looking man, for he has a fine face. "UNDRESS IN THE COMMONS. Mr. Keir Hardie's 11 undress and his cele- brated or rather notorious cloth cap reminds one of a remark made by Mr. Bart some years ago. Major Jones, now M.P. for the Car- marthen Boroughs, asked Mr. Burt why he did not go in for a cap like that affected by Mr. Joseph Cowen, the member for New- castle. The miners' representative aptly and sensibly replied, Mr. Joseph Cowen is a big uan. But I am a small man, and could not tfford to do it." Tug BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. It is now quite evident that we are to see a duffer installed at the Board of Agricul- ture, the Presidency of which has just been vacated by, perhaps, the greatest all-round authority on agricultural matters of any politician in the oountry. Fortunately, before Mr. Chaplin quitted the department he secured the appointment of Mr. Elliot to the permanent secretaryship. Mr. Elliot is not known to the public by name and reputa- tion, as are some of the leading men in the Civil Service. But in official circles in the Civil Service, and amongst those Ministers with whom he has worked, including Mr. Chaplin, Mr. Ritchie, and Mr. Walter Long, he bears the very highest reputation. JVlr. Ritchie, whom he served for some time at the Local Government Board as private seoretary, « declares that there is no place in the entire service which he is not fully qualified to fill. He is, it is said, the coming man, and will completely take the shine out of Sir Algernon West and other well-known departmental organisers. Mr. Elliot took a leading part, I believe, in arranging all details with respect to the Small Holdings Bill and in coaohing up Ministers in the matter. StR E. J. REED AND A TORY PREMIER. I hear that some of the supporters of Sir E. J. Reed and of Gladstonism in your city are very angry at the ungenerous treatment of their representative by the Grand Old Cabinet-maker. They had quite made up their minds that Sir Edward was to go to the Admi- ralty as Secretary to Lord Spencer, and it must be admitted that their belief in this matter was shared by many on the Unionist side. I do not think 1 have ever recorded in these columns a fact in connec- tion with the present member for Car- diff and a Conservative Premier of a quarter of ft century since. Lord Derby in I think, the year 1868, or possibly 1867, was much struck by a paper on shipbuilding read by Mr. Edward Reed before some institution in town, and commented on a good deal by the Tunes. He desired to strengthen the naval side of his Administration, and, aocord- ingly, sent to Mr. Reed offering him the Secretaryship of the Admiralty, with a seat in Parliament, free of all election expenses. It is rather curious to contrast this offer of Lord Derby with that of a great opponent five and twa-l- later.

THE WORLDS NEWS

The Cholera. '

VENEZUELAN REVOLUTION.

Hall v. Pritchard forI £2,000.

THE FATAL LEAP FROM A TRAIN.

CARDIFF BOARDOF GUARDIANS.

SWANSEA HARBOUR TRUST.

Advertising

¡The Newcastle Contest.

SIR WILLIAM HARCOURT AND DERBY.

A PEERAGE FOR MR. CYRIL FLOWER.

MR. ROLLS' NEW TITLE.

CLYDE SHIPBUILDING TRADE.

EFFECTIVE ACTING.

DEATH OF DR. DRYSDALE.

SHOCKING ACCIDENT AT BARRY.

THE CHARING CROSS AFFRAY.

ONE MAN PNE VOTE.

COLLIERY EXPLOSION AT LEEDS.

Cardiff Cycling Club Sports.

ABERYSTWITH UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

THE DUKE'S ROMANTIC MARRIAGE.

" USHER'S ROAD TO COURT AND…

FATAL COLLIERY ACCIDENT IN…

THE IMPRISONMENT OF CARDIFF…

SOUTH WALES COAL TRADE.

INottingham and Colwick Park…

A CHILD KILLED AT PENARTH…

TO-DAY'S MARKETS.

THE CHOLERA IN SCOTLAND.

THE RE-ELECTION OF MR. T.…

THE CHISLEHURST OUTRAGE:

IThe Great Heat.

WELSH RADICALS AND THE II…

To-day's Cricket. -0

[No title]

ITo-day's Racing. .

Portsmouth Park Meeting.

ITo-day's London Betting.

Newmarket Training Notes.

SPORTING CHAT.

Advertising

Advertising

The Railroad Strike.