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CLEARED FOR SEA. O

ENTERED INWARDS •

PROVERBS UP TO DATE.

I [ THE FIREMAN'S TRAGIC TALIS.

TRAVERS AND JEROME.

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TRAVERS AND JEROME. W. R. Travers and the late Lawrenoe Bk lerome, known always as "I.,arry" were tDo Sparable friends, though forever victimising Saoh other with pt optical jokes. Once the two Were travelling together on a train ih the South. Jest before the conductor was expected to come through the car Travers fell asleep. Jerome slyly removed from Travers's pooket the pass on which he was travelling, and, gointf forward several seats, Gat down and simulated ttumber. When the conductor shook him and asked for his ticket, Jerome pretended to <<earoh through all his pockets. Then, knowing exactly what Travers would say under the circum- stances, and imitating his friend's stuttering tpeech, he said: "I'm W-w-william R. T-t-travere, of N- STork. I had a p-p-pass, b-b-but I c-c-can't find IL I'm a b-b-brother-in-law of Mr. Blank, the president of the roa/1, and I assure you it's sM tight." The conductor accopted the explanation tM i1 on. A moment later he shook the sleep- T^aws by the shoulder. Travers felt fot pass and then, like his impostor friend Searohed through aF his pockets, the conductor legarding him with sudden suspicion. Finally he stuttered out: "I'm W-w-william R. T-t-travers, of NeW York. I had a p-p-pass; b-b-but I c-c-can't fiDeI tt. I'm a b-b-brother-in-law of Mr. Blank, the president of the road, and I assure you its aS right." "I guess not," replied the conductor. "YOII can't fool me, even with that stutter. Yonl have to pay your fare or be put off." Jerome permitted Travers to work himself intB a rage of indignation, and then interposed witb lha pass and a cigar for the. conductor. -New York Tribmmt.

"OLO NUTMEG'S" SAYINGS.