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----Notes from South Wales.

SOUTH WALES BUSINESS NOTES.

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TliE SUCCESS OF LONDON BOYS…

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SOUTH WALES BUSINESS NOTES.

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and Monmouthshire to a congratulatory recep- tion at one of the large public halls in the metropolis. The idea is a most excellent one in every way, and the gathering ought to prove one of the most interesting in the history of the Welsh nation. It should also prove a fitting opportunity for securing a photographic group of the whole of the Welsh members, the value and uniqueness of which was commented upon by Mr. Herbert Davies in a recent issue of the LONDON WELSHMAN'S correspondence columns. A photographic group of the combined Welsh members would be sure to sell well amongst the thousands of Welshmen desirous of pos- sessing an interesting memento of "All Liberal Wales." A Very Strange Country. The following sympathetic little sketch which appeared in the last issue of a Glamorganshire weekly is so true to life, that I reproduce it in these "Notes":—"A fairly heavy fall of snow occurred on Tuesday. How the schoolboys enjoyed themselves making snow men, snow- balling each other, and anyone else who came within their line of fire. What if they did break an occasional window they enjoyed themselves. How many of the grown ups are there who would not give a truck load of windows to be as happy and healthy as these red cheeked school- boys who are romping in the snow ? But what brings happiness to some brings sorrow to others. Outside work is very scarce, and the snow has stopped what bit there was. See those two strong lusty navvies coming along ? They have done no work for over a week on account of the frost and snow. They have had nothing to eat for two days, and the houses that they venture to call (the poor man's home) have nothing to give. Why don't they call at the rich man's home, you ask? Well, simply because the rich man would send for a policeman and charge them with the abomin- able crime of begging, and then their names would appear in the police-court news. Likely enough the magistrates on the bench would read them a little homily on the sin of being poor, the sin of being hungry, and, more heinous than all, the sin of asking a fellow- being to give you a crust of bread to keep body and soul together. This is a very strange country we live in, my masters." Yes, it is. Poverty is a terrible crime Welsh Drama. Not only is there increased interest being taken in the Welsh language, Welsh history, and Welsh nationality generally, but in Welsh drama as well. The public performance of "The Maid of Cefn Vdfa," at Aberdare, the other night, for example, aroused keen local interest, and it was so well appreciated that repeat performances had to be given. There was a time when a performance of The Maid of Cefn Ydfa was only deemed worthy of a travelling theatre, but the more Welshmen read of this beautiful Welsh romance, the greater does their appreciation become. Welsh and English Poets. "English poets did not approach poetry in the same spirit as the Welsh. Shelley went to love nature, Wordsworth went to think about nature, and Tennyson to study the laws of nature. But the Welsh poet went to nature to see God."—Rev. T. M. Davies, Solva, before the Cardiff Cymmrodorion Society. Sunday Golf at Llandudno. I have followed, in company with many others, the agitation now going on in Llandudno on the question of Sunday golf, with much interest. From what I understand, Mr. Cummings, the lessee of the link of the North Wales Golf Club, has been informed by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, owners of the land, that the lease will not be renewed except with a clause prohibiting play on Sundays. Hence the commotion. The Club members number some 300, and chiefly belong to Liver- pool, Birmingham, and Manchester, and Mr. Cummings has informed a pressman, so I notice, that if play is prohibited on Sundays these 300 members will cease their visits to Llandudno, which will mean "an annual loss of ^20,000." I do not want to unfairly criticise anybody; but I, for one, will not believe the statement that the men who play Sunday golf at Llandudno spend ^20,000 per annum in the town. According to this figure 300 Sunday golfers spend nearly ^400 per week in Llandudno This sounds like one of those tall American stories we read so much about. The religious denominations in the town, headed by the vicar and Nonconformist ministers, are supporting the agitation against Sunday golf, on the ground that it would be detrimental to the moral and material interests of the town, whilst the hotel proprietors, tradesmen, and others have sent a memorial to the Commissioners, pointing out that the stoppage of Sunday golfing would prejudice Llandudno in its competition with other seaside resorts, that the position of the links is isolated," that it is impossible that such play can hurt the feelings of the strictest Sabbatarians," that Sunday caddies are not allowed, and that with the exception of twenty local members, the remainder are visitors.