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Home News. ANGLESEA. For some years past a shortage of water has existed at Holyhead, and the quality has also been the subject of complaint. An agitation has been going on with a view to the buying of the water- works by the town. It has been determined by the Company to improve the supply, and they are now moving to acquire lands and purchase of a large lake known as Llyn Traffvyll, some eight or nine miles from the town. When the lake is acquired the purity of the water will be much enhanced, and the supply will be adequate tor a town of much larger size. The piping will pass through Bodedern, Valley, Caergeili g, and other villages, which will benefit by the new scheme. I BRECON. A suggestion has been made that the freedom of Brecon should be conferred on Alderman Vaughan Morgan, London's Lord Mayor, who is a native of that county. Attention is called to the fact that the History of the Churches of Brecknockshire" is nearly con- cluded and ready for publication. It has been most carefully compiled, and will be found full of interesting details. It will be beautifully illustrated with views of all the churches and of anything of special note to be found in them it will also have reproductions from photographs of nearly all the old inscribed stones in the county, these latter by kind permission of Mr. T. M. Franklen, of St. Hilary, Glamorgan. CARMARTHEN. The county of Carmarthen, and the town of Llanelly in particular, have sustained a great loss by the death at the comparatively early age of 54, of Mr. Gwilym Evans, J.P., of "Quinine Bitters" fame. By the discovery of that well-known medi- cine Mr. Evans made a name and a fortune for himself. He was connected with a large number of local industries, and until his health failed took a very prominent part in the affairs of the county, having been chairman of the County Council and a member of the Education Committee. At one time he was chosen as Liberal candidate for the united boroughs, but retired before the election. CARNARVON. Daily additions are made to the list of patrons of next year's National Eisteddfod at Carnarvon. Among the latest to signify their pleasure to act in that capacity are the Lord Mayors of Liverpool, Cardiff, and York. Mr. R. A. Naylor, the Unionist candidate for the Carnarvon Boroughs, has offered the committee a sum of £30 to cover the amount of the prize to be given in the ladies' choral com- petition. A burning question among Carnarvonshire rate- payers just now is that of providing new county offices. The Save the rates cry has been raised, and one correspondent suggests that the historic Carnarvon Castle should be. adapted, and that the county offices should be placed at one end of the quadrangle and the county asylum the other end. A wag objects to this on the ground that a stranger may walk into the Council chamber some day, and think he is in the other institution. A similar mistake might be made in other places than Car- narvon. Professor Kuno Meyer on Friday night delivered an address to the Kymric Society, Bangor, on Foreign elements in the Welsh language." After pointing out the bearing of language, properly studied, on the political, social, and literary history of a nation, and insisted that it was a better guide in remote periods than either anthropology or archaeology, he dwelt on the backward state of Celtic studies in this country, the cause of which was to be found in the antiquated systems and false methods of teaching and learning largely employed in the British universities. As long as the successful passing of examinations and the obtaining of a degree were considered the chief incentive and main end of study, no genuine scholarship, no advancement of learning, no train- ing of capable teachers was possible.

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