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Notes from South Wales.

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A WELSH GUIDE.

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Notes from South Wales.

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Broadminded Clergymen. The fact that Evan Roberts was invited to hold a service in Llandonna Church by the vicar is greatly to the latter's credit, and shows that there are broad-minded and tolerant clergy in our midst. The Vicar of Rhos and the Vicar of Ystradgynlais have exhibited a similar spirit of charity and goodwill, and it was pleasant to find a vicar of the Anglican Church present at 9 the recent Calvinistic Methodist Association Meetings at Penygarn. There is no doubt, also, that the new Bishop of Llandaff is going to prove one of the most charitable and broad-minded ecclesiastics that ever occupied a Bishopric. This is the proper Christian spirit. Merthyr Cymreigyddion. A very useful society is that known as the Merthyr Cymreigyddion. Next to the Rhondda Cymmrodorion, it is probably the most active genuinely Welsh Society in South Wales, and has done much to stimulate local interest in the Welsh language and Welsh music and poetry. The first meeting of the summer session was held the other day in the beiutiful locality of Vaynor, when tea was partaken of by a good company, and a most interesting programme of addresses, songs, and poetry was gone through. Amongst the songs were, "Gwlad y Delyn" and Hob y Deri Dando" (in South Wales style). Hob y Deri Dando." Mentioning" Hob y Deri Dando "reminds me that the original of the same was Hi a Deri- down." This was changed into" Hi a Deri Dando," or Hai i'r Deri Down." This refers to the old custom of congregating under an oak tree to sing and engage in other congenial occupations. As in English, Hai to the oaken shades let us go," or, under the oaken shades let us go," There is a reference to the custom in Virgil. Mr. Chamberlain at Cardiff. A statement in a South Wales evening Liberal journal that Mr. Chamberlain was received with hooting in the streets of Cardiff on the occasion of the recent Royal visit, has been challenged by the Conservative press, and I notice that the Swansea Daily Post refers to the report as very misleading." It was nothing of the kind. The report in the Liberal evening paper alluded to was perfectly accurate, and was the only report published that gave a true account of Mr. Chamberlain's public reception. For example, when the Birmingham M.P. emerged into St. Mary's Street, there were vigorous hoots from various directions, and in Cathays Park he was received with both hoots and jeers. In short, Joe was the most unwelcomed visitor in the whole programme, and the fact need occasion no surprise. A Summer Song. The starlight grows pale 'neath the flush of the morning, The night winds die softly afar in the west, And the t rush carols shrill that a new day is dawning, While dew drops gleain bright on her wings and her breast. Then wake from thy slumbers, oh, Cambria's daughter Come forth to the joy of a long summer's day Tho' there's mist on the hills, there's a breeze on the water To ruffle the ripples of Cardigan Bay. Beside the swift Rheidol we'll pluck the marsh mallows To weave in a garland all golden for thee, While the river runs giey through its pools and its shallows And winds through its valley away to the sea. Oh black are thy locks as the wing of the raven, And bright shine thine eyes as the stars on the foam, Or the beacon which gleams at the mouth of the haven, To welcome the mariner steering for home. Oh daughter of Cambria, why art thou sleeping ? The whisper of summer is heard in the air, Bringing hope e'en to hearts that are heavy with weeping, And joy and delight to the young and the fair. The bee and the butterfly flit o'er the meadows, The odour of flowers comes sweet through the hay, And night with the silence and gloom of its shadows Hath fled like a dream at the dawning of day I