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Notes from South Wales.

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SOUTH WALES BUSINESS NOTES.

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Notes from South Wales.

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in the neighbourhood, and lived concealed in this specus horrendum for many years, from the keen research of day's garish eye." The entrance of the cavern just admitted sufficient light to make "darkness visible." Caerphilly Eisteddfod. This annual eisteddfod seems to be growing in popularity and is now deservedly ranked as one of the best Eisteddfodau held in Wales. On Whit-Monday there was a record created both in entries and attendance, and it looks as if the future success of the eisteddfod will be greater than ever. Apart from the attractions of the eisteddfodic programme, Caerphilly is an ideal spot in which to spend a day's holiday. Its ancient castle is an attraction in itself. As the bard sang :— Pwy ystyr drwch dy gadarn fur, Frawychai c'yd warchaeol wyr Na chofia 'r mawredd wawdiai ddur, O'th ganol hen Gaerffili ? Pwy dremia ar ddadfeiliol dwr, Na chofia gyda 'r arfog wr, Am wleddau gynt wnaent rwysgfawr stwr Rhwng muriau hen Gaermli ? Caerphilly Castle is undoubtedly the best pre- served ruin in Wales with the exception of that of Carnarvon. Justice Phillimore's Unfairness. I have heard a great deal of comment in reference to Justice Phillimore's unfair treatment of a Welsh witness at the recent North Wales Assizes. It is difficult to understand how this Justice, who'is credited with being most urbane, could have acted so disgracefully unfair. As the Manchester Guardian well,, expressed the situation:—"The fact that seems to have escaped his lordship was that in so serious a matter as an examination in a court of justice every person desires to give his evidence in the language most familiar to him. Very few Englishmen, however well they know French, would care to be cross-examined in that language. With regard to Wales, however, many judges apply an altogether different principle. They seem to imagine that if a Welshman knows enough English to be able to give his evidence in that language he ought to be compelled to do so. If such a rule were applied to Englishmen in foreign countries, English judges would not be slow to condemn it. Welshmen only ask the justice that in such a case Englishmen would claim for themselves." It is to be hoped that Justice Phillimore's unfairness will be brought before the notice of Parliament. The Welsh Harp. It is a great pity that harp-playing is now almost a lost art in Wales. Attempts have been made within recent years to revive interest in the national instrument, but the results have been indifferent. There is an almost forgotten sonnet from an old book about 100 years old:— To THE WELSH HARP. Loved instrument again repeat those sounds, Those pliintive airs, that through my senses steal With melancholy sweet. Their pow'r I feel Soothing my sadness, healing sorrow's wounds. Gently thou lull'st my suit rings to repose, Inclin'st my heart to ev'ry virtuous deed Removing from my mind each dark'ning shade That clouds my days, increasing all my woes. Now swelling with the breeze, along the vales, Romantic Cambria the strain I hear, Then dying soft away, comes o'er my ear In whispers soft, still wafted by thy gales Loved instrument again repeat those sounds, Soothing my sadness, healing sorrow's wounds. Absence of Crime in Wales. Mr. Justice Channell's recent remarks in his charge to the grand jury at Radnorshire Assizes redound greatly to the credit of the Welsh people. His lordship said "There was in the smaller Welsh counties a complete absence of all crime, because the cases tried were almost entirely very simple, and he thought most of the cases were committed by strangers, and in some cases by actual foreigners. He had never had an interpreter on the circuit, and this showed that among the Welsh-speaking portion of the community there was very little crime. He dared say some people would think, and with truth, that the Revival among the Welsh people had something to do with it." Justice Channell added, however, that he would find things different when he got to Glamorgan. Yes, and he will find that in that county fully 90 per cent. of the prisoners are foreigners, and not the genuine inhabitants of the county. But, even Glamorgan-" Black Glamorgan," as it has been described, is improving. North and South Wales Temperaments. It was freely opined that when Mr. Evan Roberts went to North Wales he would find the North Walian less emotional than the South Walian. In short, the North Walian was freely described as a more phlegmatic individual altogether and difficult to arouse. But Mr. Evan Roberts' experiences in Anglesey and other parts of North Wales prove that such is not the case. In short, the North Walian is the equal of the South Walian for earnestness and enthusiasm.