Hide Articles List

6 articles on this Page

- Notes from South Wales.

Advertising

M.P. TALKING IN HIS SLEEP.

The Children's Column.

Advertising

- Notes from South Wales.

News
Cite
Share

shire the Nonconformists have displayed a remarkable unanimity in reference to their opposition to the Education Act, and the com- pleteness of their methods must have even impressed the dull intellects of Whitehall. Even Mr. Balfour, who "never reads the papers," and whose knowledge of Wales and Welshmen is practically nil, may yet be convinced that Welsh Nonconformists have consciences, and that principles are still valued in Wales, even if they are trampled upon by the "constitutional (?) party" at St. Stephens. That Wales will win on the Education question is a foregone con- clusion. The Walking Craze. I notice that the walking craze has extended to Aberystwyth. Two years ago there was quite an epidemic of walking matches in Glamorganshire, walks being arranged for pub- licans, amateur photographers, bakers, travellers, shop assistants, and even peg-leg men. Great interest was aroused at the time being, but the craze, like many other similar crazes, died out. This latest outbreak at Aberystwyth has, con- sequently, renewed interest in the old con- troversy as to whether these walking matches are justified. Walking is an excellent pastime when carried out regularly and judiciously, but to set a lot of young men to walk against time a distance of twelve, thirteen, or more miles is overdoing matters, and I know of many young men in Glamorganshire who suffer to this very day owing to their indiscretions when the craze was at its height two years ago. It is to be hoped that the Aberystwyth ebullition was only a fleeting event, and that it has now spent its course. Betting. Both the Swansea and Barry Councils have decided to black out all betting news in the newspapers supplied at the local public libraries. They deserve every credit for their action, and it is a pity that the Cardiff and Newport Councillors are not imbued with similar moral courage. Day by day it was customary to see betting folk crowding round the papers at the Swansea and Barry reading rooms to read the betting news, to the great disgust and annoyance of the more respectable frequenters of the insti- tutions, who wanted to read the general and political news, and not the demoralising in- telligence of the horse-racing fraternity. One of the Swansea newspapers-the Cambria Daily Leader--has, to its credit, decided not to insert any more betting and horse-racing news, being the first daily newspaper in Wales to take the step. Betting on horses has ruined hundreds of homes in South Wales, and many a bright young man has had his career blighted through his participation in the immoral business.