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- Notes from South Wales.

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Notes from South Wales. (From our Special Correspondent.) An Excellent Suggestion. Mr. R. S Rowlands made an excellent pro- position at the meeting of the Tregaron Board of Guardians, viz., that all tenders invited for flannel, linen, and blankets required by the Union should, in future, be ordered from local weavers. Mr. Rowlands very properly pointed out that it was the duty of Welsh people to support their own native industries, and further pointed out that -by doing so they would be stimulating local trade. I am glad to note that Mr. Rowlands' proposition was carried unanimously. A Rising Welsh Pianist. Master Percy Hughes, of the Royal Academy of Music, made his first London public appear- ance as a pianist at the R.A.M. orchestral concert, at Queen's Hall, last week. I am told by one who attended the concert, that Master Hughes' playing of Weber's Concerto was positively brilliant, and there is every indication that he is destined to have a successful future. Master Hughes, who is only about 14 years of age, has won scores of prizes at the leading Eisteddfodau in Wales. He is a native of Aberaman, a colliery town in the Aberdare Valley which has produced many geniuses, notably the late James Michael, the world's greatest cyclist, and the late Arthur Linton, another world- famed cyclist. It was here, also, that the author of Hen Wlad fy Nhadau spent a great part of his life. Who are the Best Singers ? In reading Mr. Alexander's article in the Sunday Strand as to who are the,best singers, I notice that he completely ignores Welshmen. Here are Mr. Alexander's opinions:—"Aus- tralian audiences fuse and melt together in enthusiasm, very much like the audiences in the southern part of the United States. The Scotch people enjoy the Psalms the Irish are very much like Americans, and have beautiful voices but it takes the English audiences to sing the stately old hymns with proper verve and spirit. In an audience of ten thousand people in England, nearly everyone will, at least, be singing the air." Mr. Alexander and Dr. Torrey conducted a mission at Cardiff last year, it will be remembered, but it was a comparative failure. The Welsh Revival. The Revival spirit is as strong as ever in Wales, and some very remarkable meetings were held lately in the Rhondda and Aberdare Valleys, as well as at Pontypool, Cardiff, and Bridgend, by Messrs. Dan Roberts (brother of the famous Evan), Sidney Evans, and Sam Jenkins. The latter has been described as "the Welsh Moody." His singing of "I t, achub hen rebel fel fi" is worth going a long way to hear. By the way, the recent examina- tion of Mr. Evan Roberts by four eminent Liverpool specialists, who have certified that he Is mentally and physically sound, silences the unkind assertions of a certain class of critics. Whatever may be his faults, it is a fact that Evan Roberts is one of the most magnetic Personalities of the day. Welsh Educational War. It is very evident that the Welsh Educational Authorities are not in the least perturbed at Lord Londonderry's "threats." In Merioneth-

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M.P. TALKING IN HIS SLEEP.

The Children's Column.

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- Notes from South Wales.