Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

7 articles on this Page

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

LOCA_L INTELLIGENCE.

Family Notices

HAVERFORDWEST MARKET.

Advertising

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

A NEW HAIR-DYE.—Dr M'Call Anderson, in a recent paper, say: During the treatment I ac- cidentally discovered what piomises to be the most perfect black dye for the hair which has yet been seen. After having used the bichloride lotion for some weeks, I changed it for the lotion of hypo- sulphate of soda; and the morning after the first application the hair of the part, which before was bright red, had become nearly black. One or two more applications rendered it jet black, while neither the skin nor the clothing were stained. I saw this patient a couple of weeks later, and there was not the least deterioration of colour, although, of course, as the hair grows the new portions will possess the normal tint. He was by occupa- tion a Turkey-red dyer, and was much interested in the discovery, though rather grieved to find, what medically must be considered one of its greatest advantages, that it did not dye the linen, I r, and was therefore unavailable for his purposes. British Medical Journal. SERIOUS MUTINY OF CoonES.—From Table Bay is reported a serious mutiny of coolies, 300 of whom were on board the French ship Esperance, 391 tons, Captain Noel, from Macao, January 5, for Havannah, which put into the bay on the 25th March for water and provisions. The following are the particulars of the affair. The coolies were confined below and were apparaently as unwilling I voyageurs as English convicts en route for an Australian settlement. On the passage they made a desperate effort to recover their liberty. The vessel left Macao in charge of her owner, Captain Boyce. On her fifteenth day at sea a fresh breeze sprang up which necessitated her sail being re- duced rapidly. The crew not being strong enough to do this by themselves, 50 of the coolies were brought up from below to assist in shortening sail. They were distributed about in gangs, and the crew went aloft to reef and furl. While the crew were aloft, the coolies rushed into the cabin to get at the arms. Captain Boyce, who was at the wheel, left it, and called to the crew. and rushed into the saloon sword in hand after the coolies, who were just getting out the ship's arms. A desperate conflict ensued, in which Captain Boyce was very severely wounded, and narrowly escaped with his life before the crew came to his assistance. The coolies were at length got under their leader being killed in the emeute. Captain Boyce had subsequently to be left at Anjer for a passage, via Batavia, to England. The Esperance z' 0 left Table Bay March 28 for Havannah. THE WEST-END DRESSMAKERS.—At the Marl- borough-street Police-court, Mr John Verdee, mil- liner and dressmaker, George-street, Hanover- square, was summoned before Mr D'Eyncourt by Dr Aldis, medical officer of health for St, George's, for unlawfully employing certain women alter Z, hail-past four o'clock ou Saturday afternoon. Dr Aldis, as the medical officer for St. George's, Hanover-square, had summoned the defendant for an inlringement of the 4tb clause of the Work- shops Regulation Act, by allowing women to work after half-past four o'clock on the 2nd of May. He had twice before complained to the de- fendant that he had infringed the Act, and had re- ported the circumstance to the vestry, but pro- ceedings were not instituted be/ause the defen- dant promised to comply with the Act. Another complaint having been sent to the vestry lie went to the defendant's house, and having beard what several young women in his employ bad to state, he instituted the present proceedings. Witness said that the premises were large aud well venti- lated, the young women appeared to be well taken care of, and he had only to complain of this breach of the Act. Mr D'Eyncourt said the Act was in- tended to prevent heavy and undue work beiug done by young women. In the present case the witnesses appeared to be in good health and well treated, but still there bad been a breach of the Act. If the defendant would promise it should not occur again he would oaly inflict a nominal I fille-viz, is and the coats. i

HOUSFOF^OMMON^