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CORRESPONDENCE.

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CORRESPONDENCE. We do not considerourselvesresponstblefor the opinions and sentiments of our Correspondents SIR.-Perhaps the enclosed extract from the Boundary Commissioners' Report may interest some of your readers:— CARDIGAN. The Commissioners recommend that the borough of Cardigan should be extended by the addition of the town of St Dogwell's:- •The Borough as extended may be described as con- sisting of 'The present borough of Cardigan and so much of the Hamlet of Pentygroe*, in the parish of St Dcgmell's, as is bounded on the north by the Abbey Hamlet, on the south by the Bridge-end Hamlet, on the east by the river Teify, and on the west by the following boundary, that is to say:— 'From the poitft at which the road leading from the farm house and offices called Waun, which intersects the boundary of the Bridgend and Pentygroes Hamlets, northward, along the said road, as far as the Ciawdd- cam Cross Roads; thence along the old road leading to Maenrian to the Point at which it intersects the boundary of the Pentygroes and Abbey Hamlets.' ABERYSTWITH, ADPAR, AND LAMPETER. The Commissioners do not recommend any extension of the present boundaries.' HAVERFORDWEST, FISHGUARD, AND NARBERTH. The Commissioners do not recommend any extension Of the present boundaries.' MILFORD, TENBY, AND WISTON. 4 The Commissioners do not recommend any extension of the present boundaries.' PEMBROKE. The Commissioners recommend that the district of Neyland should be added to the Borough. This lorough, extended, may be described as consisting of:- 'The present Borough of Pembroke, and such part of the parish of Llanstafi well as is included between the present boundary of the Borough and the following boundary, that is to say: — 'From the northernmost Point of Pater Battery at Pembroke Dockyard, northward, in a straight line to the middle of the Ford across the stream which runs through Church Lake at which it meets with the sea coast at the liigh water mark of ordinary tides; thence up the said stream to the point at which it meets a road running south from little Honeyborough; thence along the said road to the cross roads at Little Honeyborough thence, eastward, along the road which runs east from the said cross roads to the point at which it meets the road run- ning south from Sheeping to Honeyborough; then, northward, along the last mentioned road to the point at -which it crosses the northern branch of a stream near Sleeping which runs into Washfill Pi!l; thence down the said stream to the point at which it meeets the eastern boundary of the point of Llanstadwell; thence, southward, along the said parish boundary to the sea Bhore, and in a straight line to be drawn in direction of the powder magazine between Hobbs Point and Pem- broke Ferry, to the point at which it meets the present boundary of the Borough. Yours, &c, March, 1868. M. P. SCIENTIFIC INSTRUCTION. SIR.-I am directed by the Lords of the Committee of Council on Education to forward the enclosed copy of their Lordships' Minute of the 21st of December, 1867, establishing Scholarships and Exhibitions for the En- couragement of Scientific Instruction, with an explana- tory memorandum showing their relation to the existing action of the Science and Art Department. I am, Sir, your obedient servant, N ORMAN MAC LBOD, v Assistant Secretary. LOCAL AND CENTRAL SCHOLARSHIPS. My Lords consider the subject of scientific instruction with a view to its further encouragement and diffusion. 1. Thev refer to the Science Director of the Science and Art Department, and to the Minute of the Education Department of thb 20th February, 1867, making addi- tional grants for secular instruction to Eletneirary schools. 2. In order to assist the artisan classes who may show an aptitude for scientific instruction, My Lords resolve to aid local efforts in founding Scholarships and Exhibi- tions. The Scholarship is intended to maintain the student while remaining at the Elementary school, and the Exhibition to support him while pursuing his studies at some central institution where the instruction is of a high grade. 3. Local Scholarship.—These are of two kinds, the Elementary School Suholarsbip and the Science and Art Scholarship. 4. Elementary School Sckolarships.-The Science and Art Department wi 1 make a grant of £5 towards the maintenance of a deserving student to the managers of any Elementary school who undertake to support him for one year and subscribe also at least £ 5 for that purpose. 5. Conditions.- a. With any number of scholars up to one hundred on the register of the school there can be but one such Scholarship above one hundred and up to two hun- dred two Scholarships, and so on for each hundred. b. The ScholarsLip or Scholarships must be awarded in competition to the most successful student or students in some examination of the schoo). The absolute terms of the competition and the award of the Scholarship will be left to the managers of the school, subject to the approval of the Science and Art De- partment. c. The scholar must be an artisan or poor student as defined by the Science Directory, and be between twelve and sixteen years of age. d. He must not be the teacher, pupil-teacher, or other paid servant of a school. e. He must continue regularly to attend the day school, and— f Pass in some one or more branches of Science at the succeeding May examination of the Science and Art Department, after which the Department grant of X5 will be paid. 6. These grants will be made from year to year on the condition that the student each year pass in a new sub- ject or in a higher grade of the same subject in which he first passed. It will be for the locality to determine for how many years the student may hold the scholarship, but in no case can he be allowed to hold it for more than three years. 7. The Science and Art Department will hereafter consider such alterations in these conditions as appear necessary. 8. The Science and Art ScAolar.sMp.-The Science and Art Department will make a grant of JElO towards the maintenance of a student at an elementary school who has taken a first grade in Freehand or Model Drawing and Elementary Geometry (see Art Directory), and passed in one of the subjects of Science (see Science Directory). 9. Conditions.- a. With any number of scholars up to one hundred on the register of the school there can be but one Scholarship; above one hundred and up to two hun- dred two Scholarships, and so on for each hundred scholars. b. The Scholarship or Scholarships will be awarded to the most successful student or students in the school. e. The scholar must be an artisan or poor student as denned by the Science Directory, of between twelve and sixteen years of age. d. He must not be the holder of an Elementary School Scholarship, the teacher, pupil-teacher, or other paid servant of a school. e. He must continue regularly to attend the day school, and— f Obtain at least a third class in the subject of Science in which he has already passed, or pass in some other subject. g. In each year of holding the Scholarship he must pass either in a higher grade of the same subject or in a new subject. 10. Local Exhibitions,'—This Science and Art Depart- ment will make a grant of £ 25 per annum to the mana- gers of any school or educational institution, or any Local Committee formed for the purpose, who will raise the like sum by voluntary contributions for the main.. tenance of a etudent at some college or school where scientific instruction of an advanced character maj be obtained. The exhibition may last for one, two, or three years. three years. 1. Cotaditions. a. The exhibition must be awarded in competition in one or more branches of science at the May examina- tion of the Science and Art Department. The managers may select any branch or branches of science for the competition, and if more than one be taken they may fix any relative amount of marks they consider best to assign to them. b. The place where the student is to pursue his studies may be fixed by the managers subject to the approval of the Science and Art Department. If a Government institution be selected, such as the Royal School of Minesor College of Chemistry, London, or the Royal College of Science, Dublin, the fees of the student will be remitted. c. The exhibitioner must be of the artisan class or a poor student, as defined by the Science Directory. d. The grant of the Department will be paid from year to year on condition that a like payment has been made by the managers or Local Committee, and that the student has pursued his studies satisfactorily ac- cording to regulations fixed by the Department. 12. Transmit a copy to the Treasury and request sanction to provide in the estimate for the increased expenditure likely to be occasioned by this Minute. NOTE.-By elementary school is understood any school where elementary instruction is given whether aided by the State or not.

THE ABYSSINIAN EXPEDITION.

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