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THURSDAY, MAUCH 12TH, 1896.

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LLANWOXNO SCHOOL BOARD.

ISPARKS .FROM THE AXVli.

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I SPARKS FROM THE AXVli. Ur JOE HAMMERSMITH. The Cymrodorion Dewi Sant dinner on Friday night, was an interesting and an enjoyable function. Close upon forty patriotic Welshmen, who have not bent the knee to the Baal of cosmopolitanism, assem- bled round the festive board, each wearing our national emblem, the leek. The bardic and other addresses which followed the repast were full of the laC red fire of national enthusiasm, and they were all delivered in the grand old language of Paradise. lechyd igalon Cymro oedd en gwrando. Mr. William Edwards, the patriotic and erudite Inspector of Schools, dwelt on the recognition at last awarded to the Welsh language in our system of national education. He had the pleasure, he said, now of examining hundreds of school children in that language, which was chosen by them in preference to French and other continental tongues. He also hoped that Welsh would be given its due place in out intermediate school", colleges, and the University. To that, from the bottom ot my heart, I whisper a cordial "Amer." The Rev. John Thomas, in an instructive address, dwelt upon the service rendered to Wales by the pulpit in the past. In the future the pulpit, if it was to maintain its power, had to become more and more cultured, and its occupants would have to devote themselves more and more exclusively to their sacred duties. The preachers, in other words, would have to be specialists. In years gone by they had given some portion of their time and talent to education, journal- ism, politics, ond other outside work. They could not afford to do this in the future. Mr. David Evans very properly reminded the fathering of the great debt Wales owed to Liberalism. le did this in the spirit of the historian rather than of the political partisan There was no disputing the fact that Liberalism had fought our battles in the; past, and secured for us the privileges we enjoy' to-day. Education had done a great deal, but- it was Liberalism that had prepared the way and obtained for us even our educational advantages. I am sorry to understand that the Cymrodorion Society is not in as flourishing a condition as it ought to be. The active and devoted secretary, Gwernyfed, complained bitterly of the meagre attendance at the fortnightly meetings, and the subscriptions appear to come m rather slowly. Some effort should be made, ere another season comes round, to infuse the society with renewed vigour. Morien believes almost everything, provided it is old enough. Antiquity is a never-failing key to the archdruid's heart. He does not believe, however, in Dewi Sant. Probably the saint is not old enough to find favour in Morien's sight. The archdruid may be right. Perhaps there never was a Dewi. Morien in the rdle of iconoclast is a novelty anyhow. Our patron saint is enveloped in mystery. Goly- ddan, who, it is conjectured, flourished in the latter half ot the sixth century, calls him the principal saint of Wales. Gwynfaidd Brycheiniog, in the twelfth century, describes him as the great David of Mon- mouth." Yet Dr. Owen Pughe says he never heard of Dewi until he went to Loudon-just six score years ago. When Dewi came to be regarded as our patron saint, and when the leek was adopted as our national emblem, no man knoweth. Perhaps it doesn't matter very much. I am sorely aud sadly puzzled, Mr. Editor. The Pope, I read, is consideiing the advisability of "defi- nitively condemning Anglican orders as heretical, invalid, and outside the p?Ie of possible recognition." That sounds terrible. But to a Lay Protestant Non- conformist the exact meaning is not quite clear. Does it mean that the clergymen of the Church of England are not parsons ? If they are not parsons, what are they! And are they entitled to the tithe ? Is it to Rome we are to look, after all, for the solu- tion of the Disestablishment problem ? The mov'er in this business is paid to be Cardinal Vaughan. But behind the Cardinal there is another priest named Canon Moyes. This Canon is going to bombard the Anglican clergy, and smash them into smithereens. He has proceeded to the Eternal City to fetch ammunition and shells. When be comes hack there will be incidents. What will the Rector of Merthyr say if Rome declares his orders to be heretical, invalid, and beyond the pale of possible recognition" ? What will the militant Bishon of St. Asaph say to this ? He will not be disestablished in this way, and delivered over to Satan, without a big struggle. The Western Moil will fight for the bishops and the parsons with as much energy and courage as it does for the publican?. The only real bishop in Wales, if the Pope carries out his threat, will be Bishop Mostyn, and he is only a vicar-apostolic in Wales, his epis- copal title being Bishop of Cappadocia. I am not quite sure of the latter name, but I think it is Cappadocia. And if the Anglican clergy are to be declared here- tical, invalid, and beyond the pale of possible recogni- tion," what about the Nonconformist ministers ? Are their orders," too, to he swept off the face of the earth by a stroke of the Papal pen ? But these De great and difficult questions, altogether beyond the comprehension of an ordinary blacksmith. So I think I will leave them alone. On Saturday the Merthyr Guardians discussed the Poor-law Officers' Superannuation Bill. And a rather ourious thing happened. Canon Wade proposed that the Bill be supported, and Father O'Reilly moved the previous question. Of course, there is no reason why Catholic priests should agree on the subject of pensions. Stillthe incident appeand to tickle the Guardians, and there was some merriment when the Father rot up to oppose the Canon. Mr. Wills eat between them, and seemed at a loss to know which of his spiritual counsellors to follew. Eventually he threw in his lot with the Canon, and helped him to bombard the Father. The Father had said he expected no peusion when he arrived at old age. Mr. Wills playfully retorted that it was in the next world he would come in for it. Poor-law officers had better make sure of something in this. Mr. Dan Thomas seemed doubtful about Mr. Wills' title to a pension either in this world or the next. So the fun went on. The end of it wai that 18 guardians voted with the Father, and 19 for the Canou. Very pathetic cases come before the Guardians of the poor now and then. Two such cases were dealt with on Saturday. One was introduced by the Rev. Aaron Davie. It was that of a woman with three children. She was described as the wife of a travelling tinker, and her treatment of her offspring was revolt- ing in the extreme. After some discussion the Guardians decided to put their legal power in force, and assume the custody of the children. This is undoubtedly the best thing that could happen to the little or.es. Another case was mentioned by Mr. Dan Thomas. A poor workman lay on the bed of sickness, suffering from a serious malady. He had several children, and the wife of his bosom, who ought to care for and nurse him, had gone away. He was in receipt of ten shillings a week out-door relief, and now he suggested that the Guardians should take his children into their care. If they did that, he could go to his brother, and would not require any further relief. This very wise and humane course was adopted. A different case was that of the Dowlais man who had buried a pauper relative, and now asked the Board to refund the funeral expenses. The bills he presented amounted to £10 7s. 9d. The Board thought this was piling on the agony rather thick, and went through the bills one by one, with the result that they were taxed down to £7 0. 9d. Let this be a lesson to others. On Tuesday Mr. Massoy-Mainwarin<? introduced a motion in the House of Commons re the Sunday opening of museums, public libraries, and other institutions of that sort. The most intense interest is felt in the subject in the town of Merthyr. lu appointing new J.P.'s for Glamorganshire the Lord Lieutenant, for some mysterious reason, did not travel further north than Pontypridd and the Rhondda. It is true the Hon. Ivor Churchill Guest, whose elevation to the Bench is exceedingly popular, is connected with Dowlais and the district but he does not live there. Not a single name from the Aberdare or the Merthyr Valleys is to be found in the list. Is not this rather funny ? We have plenty of men qualified in every way for the honour, and a large number who would not exactly object to append J.P." to their namew. The list contains 17 Tories, four Liberals, and eight neutrals. Even taking all the letter to be Liberal", there are almost 50 per cent. more Tories. Comment is superfluous. Everyone, T think, will rejoice in the elevation of Mr. Lascelles Can, who has identified himself in a very acthe and enthusiastic manner with various public movements in South Wales. The newspaper he controls plays a prominent part in public affairs. We do nut all agn'c with its nulicv, and cannot all accept it" ideals. Hut everyoni: lvadily recognises the ability with which it is conducted, and its chief editor fully deserves the honour now conferred upon him. The new Sj>eaker of the House of Commons is getting on splendidly. I read tim* in tlie ISla Gazette Three times Silomo rose to.is feet, but his blatant pose and the clare of his eyeglass had no effect upon Mr. Gully, and each time Silomo was peremptorily suppressed. And the House was pleased, for both sides keenly enjoyed seeing the friend of Abdul sat upon."

GHAND THEATRE, CARDIFF.

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IABERDARE NOTES.

ABERDARE POLICE COURT.

" DELIGHTFUL " TREATMENT FOR…

BY THE WAY.

THE DISCHARGE NOTE QUESTION.

[No title]

THE BATTLE OF THE SCHOOLS.

ABERDARE COUNTY COUnT.

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IMISS MAGGIE DAVIES.

TROEDYRHIW.

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