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DOMESTIC INFELICITY AT ABERDARE.

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DOMESTIC INFELICITY AT ABERDARE. At Aberdare Police-court on Tuesday, Elizabeth lioss, a respectably-dressed woman, summoned her husband, Jarnes Ross, formerly a brewer in the employ of the Abergwawr Brewery, for non-main- tenance, and applied for a separation order.—Mr. Kenshole, Aberdare, appeared for the complainant, and Mr. J. W. Evans for the defendant. Elizabeth Ross said that she had been married twice there were two daughters of the first marriage. She was married to her present husband in 1831, but there were no children of this marriage. Her husband (the defendant) treated her very badly, and, in conse- quence of his treatment, she and her two daughters had to leave him. She went to live with her son at Pontypridd. Defendant, when he found out where she had gone, followed her and obtained work at Pontypridd. He came to see her, and asked her to go and live with him again. He promised her that he would behavo better to her in the future if she would do so. She ultimately consented, and they went to live together at Aberaman. He treated her alright for a time; but he resorted to his previous conduct, and ill-treated her again. In consequence of his ill- treatment she had to* leave the house, together with her daughters, on several occasions. On one occasion he made her lea\e her bed at one o'clock in the morning, and sent her into the street. On another occa- sion he beat her two daughters. She ultimately left defendant altogether, and was now living with her parents at Swansea. Defendant had contributed nothing towards her support since the time she had left him.—Cross-examined Defendant had a violent temper, but witness had not. She had thrown a saucepan at him, but it was done in provocation. She had also thrown a jug, which broko on his head, but she had only done this in sclf-defenee. The cause of the unpleasantness was not owing to the step-daughters. She had not told defendant that if the step-daughters were turned out of the house, she would go too. Her father had a farm and dairy but she was not trying to get a separation order in order to go and manage the dairy. Her husband used togi ve her good money when he lived with her. She had nothing to complain of on that point whilst she lived with him.— By Mr. Kensholc: Defendant took up the breakfast things on one occasion and threw them at her. Although the defendant now said that he was desirous of living with her again, he had not sent her any communication since December.—In reply to the Bench, complainant said that she was afraid of the defendant.—Gwladys Rees said that she lived next door to the house where defendant and his wife had lived at Aberaman. She remembered hearing screams. She saw the defendant, and heard him orderinghiswtfeandthedanghtersoutofthehouse. The complainant and the daughters were turned out, and found refuge at the house of witness' parents.—Cross- examined She was not at home when the complainant threw a saucepan at his wife.-—David Rees said that he remembered hearing a row, and heard defendant tell the daughters of complainant that "if they would not slip it, he would break their necks." He also told his wife to go, and was in the act of i-trikmg her, when witness and his wife prevented him. Witness had been obliged to take the complainant into his house on several occasions. He had taken her so often, that it was too numerous to mention (laughter). He often heard rows in defendant's house.—Cross-examined It was not he (witness) who caused the unpleasantness. Why should he? Mr. J, W. Evans, for the defence, said that it was a family quarrel, in which the step-daughters had interfered. James Ross, the defendant, said that he was now out of employment, and had been so for the last four months. During the whole of the time hehadlived with his wife at Aberaman, he had never struck her. He had a quarrel with her once respecting something shehadtoidancighbour. The step-daughters inter- fered, and he told them to go out. He was prepared to go and live with his wife again. The Bench ordered defendant to pay 9s. per week towards the maintenance of his wife, and made an order to the effect that she was not bound to cohabit with him any more.

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