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MERTHYR TYDFIL.

Recognition of the Honour…

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH, 1896.

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SPARKSnPECBrraiTANVIL.

ABERDARE NOTES.

llEM ARK ABLE CONSPIRACY AT…

THE TYLOIWTOWN DISASTER.

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I MERTHYR YALE WARD ELECTIONS.…

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I MERTHYR YALE WARD ELECTIONS. Our Treliarris correspondent writes On Friday evening last a public meeting was held at the flank- room of the Public Hall to hear tIll) report of the deputation appointed the previous Monday evening to visit Merthyr Vale re District. Council nomination, and to nominate a candidate for the coming County Council election in the Merthyr Yale Ward, rendered vacant by the death of Major Bell. The room and passage to the same were crowded long before the time fixed for the openinz of the meeting. A consul- tation took place, the hall above being occupied by a theatrical company, when Councillor W. Lewis announced that himself and two other deacons under- took, under the exceptional circumstances, to throw open the doors of Bethel English Baptist Chapel for -the holding of tho meeting. There was at once a great exodus to that place of worship, which was promptly filled, over 300 people being present. Electors from all parts of tho ward put in an appear- ance, and a stormy time was anticipated, much animation being prevalent. The veteran chairman, Mr. Lewis Morris, was again in the chair, supported by Councillors W. Lewis and Roberts, Meitliyr Yalo. The Chairman briefly opened the meeting, and then called upon Councillor W. Lewis to speak. That gentleman said they were all aware of the result of the deputation to Merthyr, Yale, but to their great surprise they found that Mr. Richard Davie3 was nominated after his assurance the previous Monday that he accepted the result of the meeting held on that.night. Let it be understood that this refers to the District Council. He suggested that Mr. Richard Davies should address the meeting, whereupon Mr. Davies immediately complied, and said he allowed himself to be nominated because lie thought there I was something behmd the scenes but now he was satisfied, and readily withdrew. The following resolu- tion was then proposed, seconded, and carried" That this meeting begs to offer its warmest thanks to Mr. Richard Davies for retiring." After some remarks from Mr. Uren complaining of the meeting being called in the Bank-room, which would only seat about 80 electors, the Chairman announced that the question of the District Council seat was now settled, it being left entirely to Merthyr Yale, and invited pro- positions for the County Council election.—The Kev. W, .Tones advocated the ballot.—Mr. W. M. Evans was pleased to support, and it was adopted.—During the proceedings there was considerable confusion, when Mr. B. P. Evans appealed to the electors to remember where they were, and to conduct themselves with credit and treat one another like gentlemen. Mr. B. P. Evans, Mr. Morris, Mr. Woodyatt, and Mr. Phillips were appointed scrutineers, and Mr. Ambrose Jones was appointed secretary of the meet- ings—Mr. Richards, Pentwyn, proposed Mr. Edwards, J.P., Penylan; Mr. Miles seconded. Mr. D. Richards, Graig, proposed Mr. D. Prosser; Mr. Richard Davies seconded.—Mr. Evnon proposed Mr. Jacob Rav. agent; Mr. Uren seconded.—Mr. William Jenkins protiosed Mr. W. R. Thomas; Mr. Grewsvenor seconded.—Mr. W. A. Davies thought that the nomi. nated gentlemen should be asked if they would abide by the result of the meeting. Mr. W. R. Thomas, whilst thanking his proposer and seconder, withdrew. The voting was as follows Prosser, 104 Ray, 96 Edwards, 40. Voting between Mr. Prosser and Mr. Ray then took place, and resulted as follows: Prosser, 118 Ray, 104. Mr. Prosser was, therefore, the successful candidate, the other gentlemen abiding by the voice of the meeting. The following gentlemen also addressed the meetingMr. J. P. Gibbon, Mr. Morgan, Pentwyn Mr. Gaines, Mr. D. Rees, Mr. Giles Jones, Mr. James, Fox-street Mr. Davies, Windsor-place; Mr. Thomas Rees, Mr. Edwards, Fern Hill; and Mr. Gomer Price.Mr. J. I'earce proposed a vote of confidence in Councillors W. Lewis and J. Roberts, Merthyr Yale, for past services.—Mr. Uren seconded.—Messrs. Lewis and Roberts returned thanks.—Mr. B. P. Evans proposed a vote of thanks to the chairman.—Mr. Joseph Owen proposed a similar vote for the use of the chapel, as also a vote to thescrutineers, all of which were unanimously carried. -After a few words thanking the electors in the ver- nacular from Mr. D Prosser, the meeting dispersed. A crowded meeting was held at the Bankroolll of the Public Hall, Treharris, on Tuesday evening last, Mr. J. Edwards, chcckweigher, in the chair, to consider the latest developments in connection with the vacancy upon the County Council in the Merthyr Yale Ward. After a few remarks from the chairman, Mr. I). Prosser said he had received a letter from Mr. Gray, Merthyr Yale, stating that he (Mr. Gray) had had an interview with Mr. Thomas Rees, Ynys?ored, who was nominated on Monday with Mr. D. Prosser for the seat, and had prevailed upon Mr. Rees to withdraw, which he had done.— Mr. Trosser then thanked the electors tor the honour done him, and said ho was the largest ratepayer 111 the ward but one. He wa-; in favour of tho working classes having a good education, and he never grudged the money he paid in rates for that purpose, lie had been a member of the Finance Committee and the Asylum Committee of the Council, and detailed some of the work he had done in that capacity. Although he received nearly a thousand pounds a year in royal- ties lie was in favour of their taxation. He had always voted Liberal, and could bring any prominent Liberal member of the Council to bear witness that he had done so. He had always, whilst on the Council, endeavoured to do his duty, and should do so again.—The Chairman imited questions, when Mr. W. It. Thomas asked Mr. Prossers views on the county education scheme, and another question, which were "satisfactorily answered.—Councillor W. Lewis said they met under more favourable circumstances than tho last meeting. He was pleased with Mr. Prosser's address, and was glad to find he was in favour of taxing royalties. Mr. Henry Da\ ic-s, mining lecturer, said he had no hand in this excellent arrangement, which had turned out so successful. He was pleased to see so many working men present, and believed that they had made a good choice in Mr. Prosser.—After some remarks from Mr. Peter Gardener, Mr. Smith, Merthyr Vale, and Mr. Lewis Morris, votes of thaks were passed to Councillor Prosser for his address, to the Merthyr Vale friends for ther counsel and action, and to the chairman. On Tuesday, Mr. Lewis Thomas, returning officer, attended at Treharris, in connection with the bye- election of a successor to the late Major Bell as representative of the Merthyr Yale Ward upon the Glamorgan County Council. Mr. T. Rees withdrew from the contest, and the other candidate, Mr. David Prosser, was therefore returned unopposed. Mr. H. E. Gray was elected Urban District Councillor for Merthyr Yale Ward in place of the late Major Bell. Our Merthyr Y ale correspondent writes: I hear that Mrs. Rees has been approached with a view to her coming out as a lady guardian at the forthcoming election. If she consents to stand she is assured of the popular support. IMPORTANT NOTICE OF MOTION. At the next meeting of the District Council, Mr. W. Lewis intends to call attention to the "exceed- ingly brief notice given of the bye-election in the Merthyr Yale Ward, and the limited time allowed to select a suitable candidate for nomination being only two clear days." Mr. Lewis will move a resolution on the subject, and a lively discussion is anticipated. ELECTION JOTTINGS. Mr. Lewis Morris, Q.C." was in fine form (writes our Treharris correspondent) on Friday evening last. His ready wit and humorous sallies created much amusement. He and Mr. Eynon exchanged compli- ments l-ather freely. The latter attempted to say something about the Miners' Permanent Fund, but the "Q.C." beckoned him to resume his seat, adding "that they wanted men of sense and wisdom to speak there that night, and not (loud laughter). Mr. Eynon retorted that we had got a got a good councillor (Councillor Lewis) on the Merthyr Council. He had done his work well, but be had capped all that night by putting a like that (pointing to the chairman) 111 the chair (roars of laughter). A public meeting without the "Q.C. in the chair would bo in- complete, but at times he is a little bit too funny, the result being that ho diverts the attention of the audience from the principal point. Mr. B. P. Evans' salutary remarks promptly checked what at one time threatened to be a scene of turbulence. No one thought that the I.L. P. nominee really meant business, and his withdrawal from the fray leaves Merthyr Yale in possession. The County Council part of the meeting was a funny affair, as only one of the candi- dates was present, and neither had issued or delivered an address giving an outline of what they would do if placed on the Council. We understand Mr. Prosser will do so shortly. 'V. R." withdrew, an action which has increased his popularity. A lively meeting was last Friday night's and no mistake. THE I.L.P. AND THE ELECTIONS. S)R, -iSince I last wrote you things ha\e developed considerably, which fact I deemed sufficient to justify me in altering the heading of my letter. The power- ful (':) I.L.P. has made a feeble attempt to put a Socialist working-man candidate on the Merthyr Council by offering the services of Mr. Richard Davies, a working man and a member of the I.L.P., to the electors of the Merthyr Yale Ward. On Mon- day ""eok a meeting was held at the Bankroom of the Public Hall for the purpose of choosing candidates, when Mr. W. R. Thomas and Mr. Richard Davies, Treharris, were proposed, the voting resulting in the selection of the former by a large majority, whilst the latter agreed with the result. To everybody's surprise it soon transpired that Mr. Davies was nominated, but it was only for a short time, as at the meeting on the following Friday night Mr. Davies showed the white feather by withdrawing from the contest, and the meeting was soft enough to pass a vote of thanks to him for this step. 1 call imagine how the I handful of harmful Socialsts tittered over this, and I thought what a pity they did not hold fast and go to the poll, and, to use a phrase of Sir W illiam Har- court's. stew in their own juice." Everyone knows I that the coffers of the I.L.P. are being emptied, and monev vou must have, even at a local election, and that useful commodity must be short at Treharris, for a charge of threepence is announced before you can hear Mr. Brocklehurst, B.A., define the meaning of Socialism. By the time this letter appears Mr. Brookichurst will have delivered his lecture, and we are all expecting an intellectual treat. We were promised a lecture on a former occasion by Mr. Ben Tillet, but that gentleman did not turn up, the cause, it is said, being illness, and his place was taken by a Mr. McCarthy, a voluble speaker, the chairman being Dr. W. W. Leigh, J.P. I did pity the genial doctor, because I could see he was uncomfortable in fact, ho said he did not agree with a lot Mr. McCarthy had said. But he and many others who could not swallow the lecture derived courage ftom a thought of that memorable letter that Lord Salisbury addressed to a working-man elector of a London constituency which commenced with My Dear Peters," and the additional thought that the I.L.P. may have a con- siderable hold on the working-men electors whom the G.O.M. once described as the bono aud sinew of the country." Yes the Tories aud Church people can that the I.L. P. crew are a few renegades in each place from the Liberal strongholds, and hasten to make friends with them, with a view of prolonging Toryism in its worst form, and tho continuation of the Established Church, an institution the bulk of the people havo long^ ago deserted. I pin my faith and support to that body that placed me and my like upon tho electorate of the Uftited Kingdom, apd thereby (although fractionally) gave us a voice in the management of our country's affairs and for any thoughtful working man to desert the Liberal Party after such an achievement as that would be very cruel indeed. Expectant's letter in your last issue is very tame aud far from tho poiut, for he has not dealt with my questions, neither ha9 he made any re- mark worthy of my attention. When he does I am prepared to meet him. I am now anxious to hear what a "B.A. has to say about Socialism, and I promise you another letter ere long-I am, yours, etc., ANTI-SOCIALIST. Treharris, Feb. 24th, 1896. SIR,—A correspondent favoured your columns last week with an epistle oil the above, and lie said in reference to the late Major Bell that had he lived he would have carried out the duties with "marked ability." Who is "A Poor Ratepayer," and why mislead us by his signature ? However, I suggest he should sign himself A Poor Ignorant Ratepayer, and also study polit'cal economy if he can get the right sort. Are we always to have working men who think it is the best step to put capitalists and middle class on all representative bodies? If the argument stands good here, then it stands good for the Trade Union Congress, Co-operative. Congress, See. A Poor Ratt'paj-er's appeal to the electors of the Merthyr Yale Ward is indistinct and evasive. I would say, put intelligent wording men on all ropre- sentative bodies, and then we have no need to beg, but we can dictate and rightly so, and did we but extend the system to Westminster wo should soon ascertain the cause and remedy of your correspondent's authentic statement alxmt our toilers: "Many of whom at the present time can scarcely ketp body and soul together." Eh man, we have been busy in Treharris these few days since. Such conferences of twos, threes, aud more 111 their anxiety to represent the ratepayers. Even the Times Treharris correspondent is predicting a healthy breeze in future elections, and a growing disposition to run Socialist candidates. A member of the local l.L.P. was run even to being nominated, though he has si nee withdrawn. The Trade Unionists present, I was given to understand, went dead for the I Labour representative. A couple of the railway society members were present, and surely they wero -not found wanting when an opportunity arose such as I' this. However, if such was the case, I must give my candid opinion that it is a discredit to any trade union to have men who would neglect such an oppor- tunity to assist in putting Labour in representative positions irrespective of politics. Let these cowards defend themselves, if they can, either by means of your columns or their own society meeting. We expected so much from Trade Unionism. Another rumour, and since confirmed, i.e., they are co-opera- tors Never, sir; they have yet to inherit the prin- ciples of Trade Unionism and Co-operation. A friend of mine suggests that the persons referred to are members of the Free Labour Association." I do not know, and therefore cannot say.—Yours faithfully, CONSISTENT. r correspondent, A Poor Ratepayer," writing in last week's issue of the Times, voiced fairly accurately the opinions of many other ratepayers in this and other districts. It has become almost axiomatic now, what was formerly considered a wild theory, that there has been no Act of Parliament which did not increase the rates. In connection with local taxation this is almost incredibly true. Taxa- tion has gone up by leaps and bounds, chiefly owing to the fact that our paternal Government has been forcing on us various presents and toys in the shape of councils, at which some of our wealthier people, especially if they be landlords, play at being Members of Parliament, while in other parts where we feel more democratic, we return nobody possessing six- pence, aud play at an enlightened republic. In the end it amounts to the same thing we have to pay, and pay twofold too. Our paternal Government, in the first place, makes us pay for the toy, and secondly we have to pay for all the vagaries of the toy as manipulated by the users like fathers paying for the windows which their boys break with their tops. In fact, some of us are almost ready to pray that no more expensive toys shall be given to us, but yet those we have are very pretty and we might be sorry to part with them. So the only question is, can we make them efficient at less cost ? Personally, 1 think tnere are two ways of doing this. Firstlj-, we mk'ht see that in the election of mem- bers we elect only men who, we are certain, will be careful of public money, and acting not for their own honour and glory but for the vvelfare of the people at large. Secondly, it is time for us to show our Govern- ment that we cannot possibly bear heavier burdens, and to demand that those we already bear shall be lightened. The Government, in granting us increased facilities for spending public money, rendered their grant null and void by forgetting to grant us any increase of re- venue to meet the increased expenditure. The enormous gains of the ground landlord and the owner of royalties, which annually amount to nearly three hundred millions of pounds, should be made amenable to all I. the purposes of local taxation, and then wo should find that not only would we be able to bear our burdens with some resignation, hut that even the burdens would become much lighter, «inee the unearned incre- ment would bear its part. W e cannot wilfully overlook the statement of A Poor Ratepayer that tho Taff Yale Railway Comp- any pay annually £20,000 in rates and taxes, which amounts to 1 per cent, dividend on their ordinary stock. This is indirectly a tax upon labour, but the fruits of idleness are let off scot free. I am afraid my fellow electors do not consider tie- importance of these things. They do not sufficiélltly consider the fitness of many of the aspirants for local honours. They arc too often carried away by the prejudicial influence of cliques and mechanical com- binations to defeat public opinion.—1 am, yours, etc., Vox Porn. 1.

WALES IN PARLIAMENT.

A R IN AAV AY HORSE AT CEFN.

MR. HARKY J;VAXS, A.R.C.O.j

" DELIGHTFUL " TREATMENT FOR…

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THREATENED STRIKE AT MERTHYH…

METEOROLOGICAL REGISTER

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