Hide Articles List

28 articles on this Page

MERTHYR TYDFIL.

Recognition of the Honour…

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH, 1896.

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

THE Salvationists of the United States arc passing through an interesting struggle. The question at issue may be formulated as follows Is the Army in the States to be dominated by American or by English ideas? Mr. Ballington Booth, the man at the head of affairs, has, by working on American lines, made the Army a great moral force for the up- lifting of the masses. But now certain fussy devotees of red-tape from London have stepped forward, and said the Army must be dominated by English ideas and worked on English lines. Mr. Ballington Booth has resigned, but the Army will support him to a man and to a woman in whatever steps he may take. the situation is thus a very interesting one, and the Nationalists of Wales will watch the develop- ment of events with much curiosity. The man sent from London to force English ideas down the throats of the American Salvationists is Colonel Eadie (we had almost written Bird in mistake). Evcn in religion. John Bull is deplorably addicted to coercion. He wants to do in America now what he did in Wales in the past. He sail! the Established Church in Wales must be English, not Welsh. For a time he succeeded. But the whirligig of time brought in its revenge in the shape of Welsh NOH conformity, and friend Bull had the worst of it in the long run. If this Colonel Eadie had not been one of the stupidest of mortals, he would have seen that American ideas are better for tliiii English ideas, and that, in trying to impose the latter on the Army in the States, he is simply knocking his head against a stone wall. Ho may get his way for a while. But it won't take him long to lind out that, to parody a well-known Newport pronounce- ment, there is a cosmopolitan population between New York and San Francisco who will not submit to the domination of English ideas. Trn; stoppage at the Plymouth Colliery has created widespread destitution and poverty in the neighbourhood. The District Council has pro- vided work for some of the men, and that goes some little way to alleviate the distress. Four men appeared before the Guardians on Saturday, well knowing, as they told the Board, that assist- ance from that source would entail the loss of their votes. When it comes to a question of daily bread or a vote, the latter has to go. Praiseworthy efforts are made at Merthyr, Abcrcanaid, and Troedyrhiw to feed the mouths of the hungry little ones. Soup kitchens have been opened, and the public have responded with commendable generosity to the appeals for assist- ance. Once a day at least the children arc given a "ood square meai. A handsome collection in aid of the funds was made at the Ladies' Choir con. cert on Thursday. To-day the proceeds of a foot- ball match will be devotelI to the same purpose, and to-morrow Mr. Sniithson gives a benefit per- formance at the Theatre Royal in aid of the funds. The Nonconformist miuisters of Merthyr are working, to use a football phrase, like Trojans. ¡ They attend daily at the Temperance Hall, and readily assist in the feeding of the hungry í children. They arc performing one of the practical duties of Christianity in a manner that has won for them the cordial gratitude of the community. At the time of writing the management and the men are still far apart, and the deplorable dispute contiuues. The prospects of a settlement arc gloomv and remote. Both sides arc linll and determined in support of their rights, and there does not. seem to be any inclination to yield. For the sake of the coal industry and tho commcrckl I well-being of the district, as well M for the sake of the thounauda of people who feel the pinch of poverty, we hope the crisis will soon come to a speedy and amicable tciniinatiou. THE HON. STEPHEN COLERIIWE'S letters about the expenditure of the Welsh University funds are not pleasant reading. He shows that a great deal of money has been spent in hotel bills, and that some people have made a good tiling out of the business. These charges may be met, or they may not. The suspicion that will cling to the public mind, how- ever, is that the government of the University is not sufficiently democratic. Somehow or other the affair has been in the hands of comparatively a few people. Speaking generally, the University has been captured by the friends of the three Univer- sity Colleges, and utilised as a means to bolster up those institutions. When the masses of the people of Wales come to understand this quite clearly there will be a stern demand for the revision of more important things than hotel bills.

SPARKSnPECBrraiTANVIL.

ABERDARE NOTES.

llEM ARK ABLE CONSPIRACY AT…

THE TYLOIWTOWN DISASTER.

[No title]

I MERTHYR YALE WARD ELECTIONS.…

WALES IN PARLIAMENT.

A R IN AAV AY HORSE AT CEFN.

MR. HARKY J;VAXS, A.R.C.O.j

" DELIGHTFUL " TREATMENT FOR…

BY THE WAY.

THREATENED STRIKE AT MERTHYH…

METEOROLOGICAL REGISTER

[No title]

Advertising

Advertising

Merthyr Tydfil Gas Company.