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ACCIDENT AT DOWLAIS

THE MERTHYR WOMEN'S LIBERAL…

" THE GRIP OF IRON.

SPARKS FROM THE ANVIL.

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'Co. _& u- SPARKS FROM THE ANVIL. By JOE HAMMEKSMITH. There hao been a storm in this household, a row in the kitchen." Something far more serious than a tempest in a teapot." It was Saturday mom, And quite calm was the skies, And it might be inferred That Ann Jane was likewise But she played it that day upon Joey, That's me, in a way I aespwe. Which we had a small card, one of those halfpenny cards, you know, inflicted on the human race for its sins by the General Post Office. That card was a bolt from the blue. It came into the hand", of Ann Jane, otherwise Mrs. H., and it read thusly Do you mean to say, dear Joe, that you went to Cardiff to the Rosebery meeting without your dear better the illustrious Mrs. H. ever, MATILDA." ¡ I should like to know, Mr. Joe Hammersmith," said the partner of my bosom, who is your Matilda?" I knew that the elements were in a turmoil. When I am called by my full name, with the Mr." put in front of it, I know that the storm signal is up. Ann Jane, my dear," I replied, in a tone that would soothe a roaring lion, calm yourself." Oh yes, it's all very well for you to talk like that. Who is yours ever, Matilda' ? That is what I want to know. Some disreputable hussy, I warrant. There never was a respectable girl with a flash name like that. And I am illustrated,' am I ? How am I illustrated,' I should like to know The tempest raged for some hours. At last it spent its force, and calmness once more reigned supreme over our quiet hearth. I assured Mrs. H. I had no more idea who Matilda was than she herself had. Yes, Mrs. H. accompanied me to Cardiff, worse luck. You should hearhershouting. "O'rMabonage' "Hen wlad fy Nhadau Mabon," "Aberystwitb,Mabon." How she screamed with delight when Lord Rosebery said the Establishment in Wales was doomed 1" I overheard some Merthyr chaps behind us saying to one another, "Sgwilia yina, bachan, dyco Joe Hammersmith a'i wrai» beniw biwr yw hi hefyd v. I never felt so ashamed in all my life. On the way back to the station I found that politics had made a nice muddle of her geography. When we came,to the Cattle she would insist on turning down the High-street, emphatically contend- ing that that was the way to the Tuff Vale terminus. I refused point blank to go with her. And there we stood, looking daggers at one another, and each marvelling at the other's stubborn stupidity. We'd have been there till now, I verily believe, had not my good friend Mr. John Morgan come along, talking polities as fast as ever he could with soue Dowlaia chips. "I'll go and ask John Morgan," said Ann Jane, for I can believe whatever he says." Come along this way, Mrs. Hammersmith," said my friend gallantly, giving his arm to the erring wanderer. 11 We very nearly lost the train. There was only jusi time to shove Mrs. H. into a third smoking full oi Rhondda Radicals, while I managed to squeeze myseli into the next compartment. And so we were parted, like the unfortunate married couples in the work- house. "Mind you come in here at Pontypridd, Joe," were my dear's parting words at Cardiff. At every station she put her head out through the window, and shouted, "Joe, Joe, are you alright, my dear V" The Rhondda Radicals laughed, and I but I will not attempt to describe my feelings. At one etation, Walnut Tree Bridge I think it was, in addition to the usual question about me, she said, 'Ve'e:\ regular smoking concert here, Joe." And some wicked imp of Satan answered and said, "la Mr. Bert The rest of the sentence was not audible by reason of the laughter. I was very glad to see Pontypridd, where I joined the partner of my joys and sorrows. She will noL bear of Mr. D. A. Thomas going to Cardiff. Without him, she says, Merthyr will go to the dogs slap bang. She won't listen to reason. You might as well argue with a tornado. The Cardiff people have no business," she says, "to take D.A. away from Merthyr. They can have anyone else they like. Why don't they give a call to Pritchard- Morgan or Alfred Davios ? If I had known of this at the Rosebery meeting I would have made a speech, and told them Cardiff chaps what I thought of them." She had an impression that Algiers, where Mr. Thomas has gone for a bit of rest, was a place in the neighbourhood of Capcoch. Do you mean to say it's in Africa. Joa ? Africa, where the black men are, where Forward wants to build railways, where poor Randolph Churchill fought with the lions ?' Great was her consternation when I answered Yes." Mr. Thomas, I explained, wanted some quiet place, where Mabon ceases from troubling him, and the Cymru Fyddites are at rest. "1 hope he'll come back safe and sound," she said, and that the lions and hyenas won't eat him up. And when he returns he may be able to solve that problem which vexes the souls of some of our Merthyr folk here whether the savage state is not happier than the civilised one. A very interesting question, that, and a most important one. I e"e the discussion was opened by our good friend, Mr. Taylor. Had we been savages, Mr. laylor would have been known by some other name, as no tailors would have been required. But Mr. D. A. Thomas will be able to tell us all about it when he comes home from Africa." The water-diviuer wbo visited Pontsticill must be a curious and interesting personage. His name is Rothwell, and ho oan say where well-springs are by the effect on his nervous system. He must be, I should think, a teetotaler, otherwise he would not be such an authority on water. As he lives in Cardiff, the police of that town might utilise him as a dis- coverer of shebeens. Mrs. H. was much interested in the account of him given by Hen Lane in last week's Times. She thinks" very highly indeed of Hen Lane," and is only sorry he should be foolish enough not to take unto himself a wife. All clever men ought to be married," she often says. Now let me give my readera something cheerful and comforting to wind up with. Hero it is: "The expenses of the Queen's household during last year amounted to nearly £173,000, and upwards of £ 131,000 went in salaries." 1 hats money well spent, eh? That's a profitable investment, isn't it? Having so much money in this country we do not know what to do with it, is very sensible of us to devote B173,000 of it to maintain a certain household every year. Some day the people of the United Kingdom will gettiredof this kind of thing. They will come to think that spendme £ 173,000 a year on one household "ain't good enough for them." And they will respectfully, but firmly, request the Government to devote that cash to something better and more useful. You and I, dear reader, have to work hard from early morn to dewy eve, to produce that money, and we ought to havo something to say as to how it is spent Households that cost £ 173,000 to keep up for a year, are luxuries we cannot long afford t»--enjoy in this country. More especially so, if said households are as barren and as unproductive of good as the sandhills on the sea-shore. As a rule we pay inoneyj" for value received." W hat value," I should like to know, do we receive foi this £ 173,000 ? Consider what these figures mean. They are not much less in amount than the actual nett tithe received by the Established Clergy in the whole of Wales. The clergy do something in return for the money, but the "household" in question does nothing it produces nothing, adds nothing to the sum total of the wealth of the community. There are some 65,000 people living in the parish of Merthyr; the money spent on the Queen's "household" every year would give give close upon LS to each man, woman, and child, from Dowlais Top to Treharris. Reckoning five to the family, there are 13,000 households in Merthyr, and each of them, sup- posing the £ 173,000 were divided amongst them, would receive a sum of over £ 13. Really this is a matter the nation had better see to. -+-

POXTSTICILL WATER QUESTION.

MERTHYR SCHOOL BOARD ELECTION.

QUAKERS' YARD.

ASSAULTING COUNTY COURT BAILIFFS.

j HOPE MI TT:AT, IMPROVEMENT…

I POLICE CorKT.

MARKET SQUARE CIIATET. ANNUAL…

! CONCERT.

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! ! TEMPERANCE AT DOWLAIS.

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THE POINTS AT ISSUE.

MERTHYR.

To the Editor.

To the Editor of the Merikjtr…

To the Editor.

To the Editor.

HAVE THE QUAKER'S YARD PEOPLE…

METEOROLOGICAL REGISTER.

'T [ BY THE WAY.

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ITEA.

SrccKSs.

SrocESS.

A DAKGEBOVS SCBSIPEN'CE.

jCOAT. CONTRACT.

I JHWKA MON.

!THE Inos A',I) STKEI. TRADE.

) TABERKACLK TKMPEEAVCK SOCIETY.

J YOTF. OF COX!>OLEXCE.

MARKET SOT A HI: MUTUAL IMPROVEMENT…

j LLANDOVERY COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 31ST, 1895.…