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A SKETCH OF DICK COTTON'S…

ISFITOME OF MEWS.

THE HUSBAND, THE WIFE, AND…

BREAOH OF PROMISE OF MARRIAGE…

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BREAOH OF PROMISE OF MARRIAGE CASE. At the Town-hall, Leeds, on Monday, a jury was empannelled before Mr. Wheelhouse, the Sheriff's assessor, to award damages in an action, Langthorn v. Ellison," in which the defendant had suffered judg- ment to go by default. It had been brought for a breach of promise of marriage, the plaintiff being a weaver at Mr. Dewhurst's mill in Skipton, and the defendant is a cattle-dealer at Carlton, near that town. Mr. Robinson said the plaintiff was 19, and the daughter of the clerk at Christ Church, Skipton. The defendant, whose age was 32, became acquainted with her at Whitsuntide, 1864, when he got the mother's approbation to visit her at her home. The intimaoy soon became closer, and letters passed between them. The first was dated Sunday evening, and he (Mr. Robin- son) thought it was evidently the first, because in it he addressed the plaintiff as "My dear Miss Lang- thorn." The others which followed were oouched in terms of greater endearment. One dated Carlton, Tuesday evening," called the plaintiff My Dear Mary Ann;" and in it, after explaining that he had been travelling, he said, Please to meat me to-morrow night (Wednesday) in the fields in Broughton-road. Cross the line at the gatehouse. I will not keep you long, Mary Ann; don't be afraid to come, for you have no cation to be frightened of me. I will be there at the time specified to meet you-From your own dearest JACK." The plaintiff met the defendant as re- quested, and he appeared then to have seduced her. The plaintiff was delivered of a child on the 2nd of April last, and nearly up to Christmas last the defendant continuod his visits, being about that time married to a lady at Manchester. It was contended on behalf of the plaintiff that the defendant had deliberately intended to break his promise, and, therefore, the case called for exemplary damages. The only question was as to the defendant's circumstances. He had told the mother of the plaintiff that he did a large business, and was not at a loss for a few hun- dreds, and could earn 18a. a day the year through. He had also told the plaintiff that a man at Gargrave owed him < £ 100, and he was going to have a lawsuit about it at Liverpool. He had talked to the plaintiff about re- ceiving telegrams from Scotland, relative to oattle, and that he had been riding from nine o'clock on Monday morning until eleven on Saturday night, and from these circumstances the jury would be able to form an opinion what he could earn. The plaintiff had ob- tained an order in bastardy against the defendant, and the magistrates who lived in the same locality as the defendant, and would know his circumstances, had made an order upon him for the highest amount which the law allowed. Mr. Bruce addressed the jury in mitigation of damages, contending that the defendant was not a cattle dealer, but merely a driver. The learned assessor having summed up, the jury re- tired, and after being looked up nearly four hours awarded the plaintiff .£68 5a.

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