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r Flower Garden and Plant…

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r Flower Garden and Plant Houses. NOTWITHSTANDING the extreme heat of the weather, shaàé may now in a great measure be dispensed with. Acacias and other winter-flowering plants having been subjected to a period of compara- tively dry treatment, to ensure their blooming pro- fusely, should now or soon be pretty liberally supplied with water at the root, in order to get them into flower during the dry season, when they will be much more- esteemed than in spring, when flowers are plentiful. BEDDING PLANTS. — Cuttings of calceolarias and zonal pelargoniums may still be put in where stock of such things is deficient. Cuttings of calceolarias taken from plants m the open ground are, howeve* liable to damp off in heat; but they will be found to do very well in a close pit or frame, where there is the dis^ld appljmg a little warmth when necessary to CHRYSANTHEMUMS. These should now occupy at- tention; let them be tied into form, but not too stiffly: where the flower-buds are too thick, thin them out: keep them well watered, in order that they may not lose their leaves. FORCING GARDEN.—Pine plants swelling their fruit should be assisted with a brisk temperature, say from 65 deg. to 75 deg. at night, regulating this according to the state of the external temperature, keeping the house rather close on sunny days, and allowing the thermometer to rise to 80 deg. or 85 deg. before giving air freely. Also endeavour to proportion the mois- ture to. the temperature, for a high, dry temperature is not favourable to the swelling of the fruit, and there s no chance of getting well-swelled heavy fruit without plenty of warmth and moisture. Maintain a steady bottom heat of about 85 deg., and use every care to keep the soil in a healty state as to moisture Any young plants growing in pota which may require repotting should be seen at once, so as to allow an opportunity of getting them established in fresh pots while they can be kept tolerably warm. Keep moist and rather warm for a time after shifting, so as to encourage the formation of fresh roots. VINES. Before wet, comparatively sunless weather sets in, we would advise covering the borders of houses in which it is intended to keep ripe grapes for any length of time, so as to prevent the soil getting satu- rated about the roots. Look over ripe grapes fre- quently, cutting out any tainted berries immediately they are perceived, and keep the atmosphere as dry as possible, but use no more fire-heat than may be abso- lutely necessary.

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