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FALL OF A RAILWAY BRIDGE.

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FALL OF A RAILWAY BRIDGE. The Great Western Company on Thursday sustained another loss by the partial destruction of one of its bridges in Birmingham, the accident being attended with serious injuries to one man only, though it is astonishing that no more have suffered either loss of life or injury to limb. The scene of the occurrence is known as Livery-street-bridge, the line of the Great Western Railway passing on a diagonal line beneath Livery-street at this point. The roof of the bridge is formed of large iron girders, supported on strong brick arches, and between it and the street pavement are courses of brick and a mass of soil. At present there seems nothing to account for the accident, a great portion of one end of it having given way with no warn- ing whatever. From Snow-hill Station a high brick wall runs by the side of the line, protecting it from thq street; and from the direction taken by the line at the end of the bridge farthest from the railway station, a portion of this waH was over the railway. The fall of the bridge, which took place about ten minutes to five in the afternoon, was observed by a great many per. sons in the neighbourhood, who at first thought several of the foot passengers in the street must have fallen with the mass of iron, soil, and brickwork. The wall was observed to totter, and then a great portion of that side of the roadway over the end of the bridge was seen to fall in, a tremendous crash alarming the people at a considerable distance, who were quite un- aware of. the cause. It was soon seen that one of the large and several of the smaller girders had given way, and having broken in several pieces, had fallen on the rails, leaving a great gap in the street, and tearing the masonrv on each side. Sergeant Heavering, of the Birmingham police force, wag within a very short distance when the accident took place, and he noticed that one man wa's passing along the footway, and had fallen with the mass of material, which there was much reason to fear would have crushed or stifled him. The first thing done by the police-sergeant was to send a messenger to Snow-hill and Hockler Stations, in order that the railway officers there might prevent any trains coming in the direction of the damaged bridge until the line was cleared, and he then sought assist- ance to extricate the unfortunate man, who lay almost completely buried amid the debris in which he had sunk. It was found that his name was John Hux- table, a traveller, living in Cox-street, and that he had sustained a fracture of the thigh and a lacerated face. These injuries were at once attended to, and there is every likelihood that the case will progress favourably. Birmingham Post.

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