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CHOLERA PANIC IN SICILY.

TBM W^PMROR -NAPOLEON IN THE…

DELAY IN INDIAN TELEGRAMS

VSATES FROM DESTITUTION.

THE CATTLE PLAGUE.

THE RUSSIAN CATTLE PLAQUE.

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THE RUSSIAN CATTLE PLAQUE. The Prussian report on the Russian cattle plague, throws a flood of light upon that disastrous visitant and upon the causes which-more immediately lead to; its generation. The Prussian Government dispatched: to Russiatwo physicians in September, 1864, to inquire; into the state of the cattle plague then raging in some! of its province?, and the published resultsarestartlingl in the extreme. The black sickness," or the "pas.; tula maligna," was prevalent in 1864 in the well-1 watered lowlands near Lakes Onega and Ladoga, and) along the rivers Volga, Neva, &c. The flat level! plains extending along these,rivers consist of mead- and pasture land, with a marshy and sandy seU, partly overgrown with low scrubs, and partly1 with pines and firs. The water remains in a. stagnant state, causing the meadows to resemble more nearly enormous swamps than useful, healthy pasture land. Yet there is an insufficient supply of pure water for drinkina-: -walls construction are scarcely ever to be Been. The culti- vated portion of the plains and those used as. pastures for cattle are extremely small in comparison with their extent. Even the larger landed proprietors are Of opinion that cattle of themselves bring in no material profit, but must be kept for the sake of the manure only. Scarcely the tenth part of the surface of these meadows and moors is appropriated to agricultural pur- poses, although the soil, from its chemical properties being composed of a rich black earth, would yield a most profitable return. The inhabitants, however, are mere children, and have not even got through the ABC of culture. Altogether, agriculturists in Russia are at a very low ebb of civilisation; and with some few good qualities there still prevail among tharn OiUltimo ignorance, supervision, barbarism, disorder, and uncleanliness. So long as the country is not covered with deep snow the cattle must seek suste- nance for themselves in the large plains; consequently they at times live in the enjoyment of great abund- ance, and at others with difficulty find the means of subsistence. They must slake their thirst wherever they can. This they do in the muddy water on the shores of the rivers, or in the hollow tracks left by their migrating from point to point in search of food. In the winter they find but slight shelter from the snow and in. clement weatherin theill-kept courtyards, in sheds, and in narrow, dark places, where very insufficient food is given them. No sooner has the sun melted away the snow than the cattle are driven to the pastures, still inundated with water, where, exhausted by the- starving process of the winter, they speedily consume what has been left from autumn as well as the first buds of spring, which the rapid vegetation ;qaickly develops. As the herbage grows the temperature in- creases in warmth, and the exhausted animals have not sufficient stamina to oppose to the groat extremes of heat and cold which day and nigrht offer, rrn. _i i •». The yasvob, or plague, breaks out periodically, especially after a. hot season, in different parts of Russia, but generally on the banks of the great rivers and in the low, raarshy plains. All domestic animals, without distinction, are liable to be attacked by it. According to official state- ments the number eff horses alone that perisied of this malady in 1864 amounted to 72,306 and of cattle 60,000 had sueeumbed in the same year. There are two kinds of yasva, it is-eith^r an acute or apoplecHc disease, when it kills its victims very rapidly, or it is chronic, when it is pallerd "dipthepitic," from the boils and swellings accompanying it. The apoplectic kills the animal in an hour or less. The animal suddenly begins to tumble, looks dull and stunned, cannot stand steady on its legs, breathes heavily, now and then emits a strange, half- involuntary sound, falls prostrate on the ground, and dies with or without spasms. The apoplectic kind is the rarer of the two, and is always fatal. The oxanthematio kindj does not necessarily end in death. It begins* with sudden and painful sMverings, which, after the lapse of an hour, are followed by the appearance of small pustules, chiefly on the withers, breast, beUr, i udder, and penis, or, more rarely, on the ribs, hind legs, and crup. These pustules rapidly increase in size, penetrating deep into the cellular tissue. They are neither very hot, nor particularly painful; some- times elastic, and allowiag of being moved this way and that way with the skin, sometimes herd, fast, and sticking immovable to the body. On dissecting the animal they are found to contain decomposed in- gredients of the blood. As the pustules grow larger the animal begins to tremble, and becomes feverish and doleful. It stands quite still, with its eyes fixed and its head hanging down. Notwithstanding the ever and its increasing violence the appetite does no cease, the normal functions of the bod- continuing at the same time much as ordinarily, I

A CATTLE PLAGUE IN AMERICA.

DOUBLE MURDER AT BATLEY. NEAR…

■T^E .MTJILDER OF MAJOR, BE…

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UTTEBIM .COUNTERFEIT GOIN…

CONVICTIONS FOR SELLING DISEASED…

THE FRAUDS ON PHlilBIRMINGHAM…

FRIGHTFUL DEATH OF AN INSURANCE…

ATTEMPTED WIFE MURDER.

COMMITTAL OF TWO YOUNG LADIES…

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