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SUMMARY -OF PASSING EVENTS.

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FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. »

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DISORDERS AT SANDHURST.

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DISORDERS AT SANDHURST. U glv TOjlianOTU. +.ho to. v o iOOCiitl V come across the wood and water that girdle the Royal Military College at Sandhurst. It has been rumoured that the youths training there for the status of "officers and gentlemen" have manifested so little preliminary possession of the latter qualification as to provoke from the outspoken Commander-in-Chief a declaration that they were a set of snobs;" and that they have glaringJy shown their unfitness to com- mand, by displaying an obstinate unwillingness to obey. This is not pleasant news. No doubt, there has been more smoke than fire; still there must have been a very serious amount of fact to justify the storioslthat have been flying about. At starting, how- ever, we must say that the ill-odour in which Sand- hurst at present stands cannot be used as an argument against the attempts that have been made of late years to offieer our army with a more highly educated set of men than those who previously used to get com- missions. The worst rioters at Sandhurst, it seems, are the least clever or industrious of the cadets, who only care to make sure of the minimum amount of marks at the final examination. Such turbulent spirits would have got into the army before by purchase, as at present, and would have played pranks in barracks instead of college. It is not because a lad has to pass an examination before be can enter the college, and another before he can obtain his commis- sion, that he becomes unfit to be an officer. Those examinations have <?one one good thing-they have made him acquire a certain amount of professional and general knowledge, some of which, at least, must stick to him. The mischief seems to be that, having crammed, he can take things, intellectually, easy; whilst morally be receives no guidance, and is subject to very little restraint-unless when he becomes abso- lutely outrageous, and the Duke of Cambridge has to come down and scold in his Royal Highness's charac- teristicallyemphatic manner, put back, and keep for life out of the army. When young men at the close of their college career axe punished in the last way, the Sandhurst authorities can scarcely have easy consciences. ——————*—————'

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