Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

SHOCKING DEATH IN A RAILWAY…

THE LOSS OF THE GLASGOW STEAMSHIP…

DREADFUL SUFFERINGS OF A SHIP'S…

SOifF LONDON PLAGUES OF FORMER…

THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.

"HE LONDON and RAMSGATE MURDERSJ…

GREAT BOAT.RACE BETWEEN KELLY,…

MR. TIDD PRATT AND THE GARIBALDI…

NORTH-EASTERN LONDON EXHIBITION…

SUPPOSED MURDER AT WINDSOR.

GENERAL LANGIEWICZ ON THE…

News
Cite
Share

GENERAL LANGIEWICZ ON THE POLISH STRUGGLE. General M. Langiewicz, the ex-dictator of Poland, having been lately travelling in Switzerland, the citi' zens of Lugano availed themselves of the opportunity to present to him an address, expressing their sympa- thies with the cause of Poland, and their admiration of the distinguished part taken by that general in the brave but unsuccessful battle for Polish independence. In reply the general expressed his gratitude for the fraternal welcome with which they had honoured him, and his joy in receiving it as a new proof of their sym- pathy with his unhappy country. Whilst the contest raged the ardent wishes of the Swiss were for Polish success, and now to the Poles dispersed they offered hospitality in the bosom of their families. But though the Poles wore forced to succumb under the weight of their country's misfortunes, the hope must not be relinquished that the day was not fat distant in which they would achieve that inde- pendence which the Swiss now enjoyed That hope was not an illusion. During eighteen' months some warriors, unselected, clothed in rags, half fed, half armed, held out against the krmieS of a colossal monarchy, supported by two powerful empires which for a century had taken part in a great crime. Diplomacy, always astute, cast the ser- pent into the Polish camp, and by ministering to the unworthy predilections of men whose proud ancestors had imbued them with a lust for power, paralysed the initiative of the popular struggle to which the Atlantic only would be the limit. The general then proceeded to say that the European dynasties felt that on the banks ef the Vistula was initiated the battle of coming revo- lutions. From the Seine to the Neva oppression pre- vailed, supported by two millions of bayonets and by myriads of satellites, ready in their alarm to combat legions as yet invisible. In conclusion, the general, in referring to the future, says:—"A generation had grown up under our eyes-a. generation which had in the Polish insurrection shown the power of men whO desire to be free-in the great American Republic and in the Helvetian Republic they upheld the proximate institutions of their own country—a generation in fine, which will take the Swiss Confederation for'the model of its international programme." ■ — — — Termination of the New Zealand Wf.r.- At last the war in New Zealand is reported to be at as e?-"c T. Thompson, the indomitable Wslkato ehief, M smreiidered to Brigadier Curry, and is the rebellion is now deprived of its animating spirit, it is only fair to assume that it will gradually cie out. Although not the Maori King, William Thompson was the New Zealand king-maker. He impressed every one by his honesty, intelligence, and sagacity. The Rev. Dr. W. Jacobson, who has been nominated to the Bishopric of Chester, rendered vacant by the death of the Right Rev. Dr. John Graham, and elected by the Dean and Chapter, in ac- cordance with her Majesty's cong6 d'dlire, will be con- secrated by the Archbishop of York in York Minister, on Thursday, the 24th instant, being St. Bartholo- mew's Day. The Archbishop will bo assisted by tho Bishops of Manchester, Durham, and Ripon.