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GREAT BOAT.RACE BETWEEN KELLY,…

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GREAT BOAT.RACE BETWEEN KELLY, CHAMBERS, AND COOPER. This event, so interesting to the aquatic community, ,came off on Friday, at Lynn. Several other races came off interesting to the locality but not elsewhere, the contests being .chiefly between rowers of the neigh- bourhood. The town had made quite a holiday fcr the occasion, and some of the ships lying in the stream were dressed with flags from stem to stern and from the deck to the masthead. There was an enormous gathering of spectators from all the" country-side." and a large number from London. These had an excel- lent view of the race on the sloping but rather soft- banks of Lynn Water. The water is wide and for near a mile and a half straight from one end to the other. With its railway bridge and ample width it bears some resemblance to the Tyne near the Scotswood course. The afternoon turned out very fine, and the very thieves, thimble-riggers, and sharping knaves, some of whom attended from London, seemed delighted to bask in the unwonted sunshine. The already declining sun was shining pleasantly on the town of Lynn before the umpire's boat was rowed over the course by the following cockney crack rowersRobert Bain, Frank Kilsby, George Cannon, John Caffyn, Picke, J. Dove, Bevan, and Joseph Sadler, stroke-Mr. Brickwood, the referee, steering. There was a fair sprinkling from canny Newcastle, in- cluding Messrs. Blakey, Wilkinson, Pickett, Dunlop, &c. By five o'clock Cooper was waiting on the one bank of the Ouse for the start, Kelly on the other. Kelly was busy touching up his boat and nailing a washboard round the well to keep out spray in case the wind rose. Chambers soon after rowed his boat up to the starting place, landed, and, like Kelly, at once busied himself with looking to his boat. When the tide began to ebb, and the referee, Mr. Brickwood, called upon the men to take to the water. All three were soon darting like martins about the boats moored for the start; stretching their muscles for the race. A stream with a width of from 80 to 100 yards of clear uncovered water was at the disposal of the men, and with but one gentle half-felt bend in the whole 3,300 yards. One false start was made, Cooper going off with a tremendous bound, Kelly declining. The rowers started from three separate boats moored near the middle of the stream. Kelly had got the best. berth in mid stream, Cooper nearly as good in the tide way on the one side (west), Chambers in the slackest water, and therefore the worst place on the other. At the second call of the starter the men got off well, Cooper again with a spring like an aquatic bird that shot him ahead of his fellows at once. Kelly was smart, but Chambers lagged from the outset. His long, strong, but more tardy stroke did not seem to clip the ebbing stream so effectively as the more tripping rowing of the other two. He seemed too slow as the other two evidently discounted the shorter distance of the course and were putting out their strength at once, trusting to their being able to hold out. The pace for a quarter of a mile was very smart. Cooper, leading Kelly by half a length, was gradually pressing on the cockney, who was his boat's length ahead of Chambers. At the slight bend Chambers went bodily over towards the other side of the stream, to where the ebb was strongest, and was forty yards wide of the other two, for the rest of the race. At the half-mile Chambers was two lengths astern; Cooper still half a length ahead of Kelly. A more beautiful contest never gladdened the lover of boating than was now seen between Cooper and Kelly. The men were rowing exactly in the same time and ap- parently the same length of stroke, and moved like parts of the same machine, the head of Kelly's boat just reaching the well" of Cooper's. At three- [uarters of a mile Kelley had drawn a little on Cooper J md was then pretty near level with him-the cockneys ubilant indeed! Chambers being three or four lengths istern, but having more tide under him out in the stream, and rowing his old characteristic stroke, 1 hooper again exerted himself and got half a length in idvanoe, but no more. With little variation this was kept up for another half a mile. Chambers, now aided by the tide, lassened his distance in arrear, and was much watched. Cooper drew his boat nearly clear of Kelly, who" was thereupon called on by his friends on the bank to L" pull out." Kelly answered the appeal, and so kept Cooper from getting clear of him. Cooper rejoined by another effort to shake off Kelly, and in doing so committed the fatal blunder of rowing right in front of Kelly, taking his water under the very nose of his boat. Kelly was too good a waterman-too thorough a graduate of the Thames-not to seize such a chance, put on an effort, and just tipped Cooper's stern, and then for two or three strokes stopped rowing. This mute appeal to the referee was not made in vain! Kelly then, having let Cooper get ahead, and out of his immediate path, rowed out into the stream, there being still half a mile to the winning post. At a quarter of a mile from home Kelly was under two lengths astern, while Chambers was not much more behind on the other side of the stream. Cooper finally, amid a tremendous noise and bustle, rowed in first by a length and a half ahead of Kelly; Chambers about as much behind the champion. Of course an appeal was immediately made to the referee for his decision as to Cooper taking Kelly's water, he (Cooper) not being a "clear length in advance." Mr. Brickwood, the referee, at once declared that the "foul" invalidated Cooper's claim and put him out of the race. So Kelly wins the race and Chambers gets second prize, Cooper being literally nowhere." The friends of Kelly contended that their man would not have been in arrear of Cooper had he not been forced into the slack water by the manoeuvres of the Tynesider. Against this it waa fairly urged that the ebb had not set in very swiftly and that Cooper foolishly lost nearly as much of it as Kelly. It would have been more in accordance with the general wish to have a fair race" that assembled the first rowers in England on the broad open waters of Lynn, instead of the steamer-ridden Thames. Cooper has suffered the full penalty, ahd is properly thrown out of the whole race for violating a law more essential to fair rowing than any one in the whole oode. The jubilant winners by Kelly's good fortune, who saw the race, will have no disposition to underrate the merits of the unfortunate Cooper, who has again' let the prize slip through his fingers. Time of race, llmin. 37seo. Betting at start; 6 to 4 on Kelly, 3 to! against Chambers, and 4 to 1 against Cooper.

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