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SHOCKING DEATH IN A RAILWAY…

THE LOSS OF THE GLASGOW STEAMSHIP…

DREADFUL SUFFERINGS OF A SHIP'S…

SOifF LONDON PLAGUES OF FORMER…

THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.

"HE LONDON and RAMSGATE MURDERSJ…

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"HE LONDON and RAMSGATE MURDERSJ q Adjourned Inquest. j On Tuesday morning Dr. Wm. Hardwicke presided £ iver the jury in the Board-room of the Holborn Union, 6 or the further investigation of the deaths of the three j shildren found dead in bed at Starr's Coffee-house and I Sotel, Red Lion-street, Holborn. Mr. E. T. Smith, ] barrister, instructed by Messrs. Gold and Son, of ] Sergeant's Inn, Chancery-lane, appeared to watch the proceedings on behalf of the suspected murderer, and Mr. Inspector Tanner, of the Detective Force, Scot- land-yard, and Mr. Superintendent Serle, of the E division, were present on the part of the police. Dr. Anthony Roberts being recalled, said he had made a post-mortem examination of the children, and he described their external appearance. At this stage of the proceedings Inspector Thom- son, of the Detective Force, Scotland-yard, brought in a little girl, Eliza. Annie, the surviving daughter of Mrs. White. Dr. George Harley, Professor of Medical Jurispru- dence at University College Hospital, said on the 9th instant he visited Starr's Hotel. The children lay as though their deaths had been rapid and painless. The nails of the two younger children were of a blue- ish cast, and the extremities livid. The eldest boy's finger nails were of a livid colour. The jars contain- ing the viscera of the deceased were subsequently analysed, and prussic acid was found. The liquid also from the bodies contained prussic acid. He then ex- amined the bottles and tumbler found in the room. The first bottle contained chalk and paragoric, and the second contained about four drops of copaiva, which had given the peculiar smell in the róom. On that bottle there was human hair on the mouth of it. The tumbler had also contained copaiva. From the analysis which had been made he came to the undoubted conclusion that the deaths of the three children were caused by prussic acid. Sarah Petty, of 2, Cornelia-terrace, Battersea, said: Last Friday week Southey came to her house and said if they did not let him know where Mrs. White was gone some harm would come of it. She would not let him into the house any further than the stairs. The child which Mrs. White had left in her charge on the 20th July knew Southey, and appeared to be afraid of him. Mrs. White had gone to Liverpool with the view of sailing for Australia. Mrs. White had frequently spoken to her about Southey, but said, for the sake of her children he must know nothing about her, and that she hoped to lead a better life. The child Eliza Annie, not yet seven years old, was too young to be put under examination. Inspector James Thomson of the Detective Police, Scotland-yard, said on Friday he went to Mrs. Petty'a residence, where she handed over to him some papers, amongst which was a letter, unopened, addressed to Mrs. White. It was in Southey's handwriting, and dafted August 5.' He opened the letter, which urged upon Mrs. White that if she did not join him some- thing more terrible would happen than she could imagine. Mr. John Searle, superintendent of the E division of police, said on Wednesday morning last Inspector Pearce had informed him of what had taken place at Starr's coffee-house. He went there and saw the children, as had been described. Since the analysis he had made an inquiry of a Mr. Blaxhall, chemist, 309, High Holborn, as he found that address, on a label on one of the bottles. He understood that a man answering the description of Southey went there on the Tuesday morning (the 8th), and said he had under his charge a little boy about ten years old, who had been staying with some friends, and they had neglected him. The child was suffering from diarrhoea. He asked him to make up a chalk mixture, and to put in some paregorio and chloric ether, which led the chemist to believe that he was a medical man. While the mixture was being prepared he asked him the wholesale price of a pound of Schiel's hydrocyanic acid. He told him. He did not ask for any. On re- ceiving the bottle of chalk mixture he held it up, and in a very offhand manner said, What are you going to charge for this ? still further inducing the chemist to believe he was a medical man. He charged 8d. for it. Now that the poison had been discovered further inquiries would be instituted. The Deputy Coroner said that as an adjournment was desirable such a course had better be adopted. The jury agreed, and trusted that in the meantime the Home Secretary would be written to, so that steps might be taken for the production of the supposed murderer, as he had not yet been identified. Mr. Smith thought it would be advisable that the letter which had been referred to by Inspector Thom- son should be produced at the adjournment. The inquest was then aJjomnoJ to TuoaJay, the 29th inst. The three murdered children were buried on Satur- day in the Victoria-park Cemetery, at the expense of Mr. White. The funeral was managed very quietly. During the night of Friday three coffins were brought to the Star Coffee-house in Red Lion-street, and be- tween nine and ten o'clock next morning, the police having withdrawn, a hearse and a solitary mourning coach were driveu up, the remains of the three hapless victims wore placed in the hearse side by side, and conveyed to their last resting place.

GREAT BOAT.RACE BETWEEN KELLY,…

MR. TIDD PRATT AND THE GARIBALDI…

NORTH-EASTERN LONDON EXHIBITION…

SUPPOSED MURDER AT WINDSOR.

GENERAL LANGIEWICZ ON THE…