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SHOCKING DEATH IN A RAILWAY…

THE LOSS OF THE GLASGOW STEAMSHIP…

DREADFUL SUFFERINGS OF A SHIP'S…

SOifF LONDON PLAGUES OF FORMER…

THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.

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THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. Terrible Warfare. At the Cape the chief event of the summer has been the commencement of hostilities between the Free State Boers and the Basutos. The beginning of the campaign has been marked by the usual feature of savage war- fare. Uncivilised hordes, inflamed by motives of revenge and hatred, had been let loose upon the country; a large number of farm houses had been burnt, and the lives of many isolated farmers sacrificed incoldblood; while in several instances where a spirited resistance had been offered by groups of farmers, the Basutos had retreated without doing any injury. Several of the murders of the farmers had also resulted from their too great faith in the honesty of the Basuto character, having been treacherously cap- tured under flags of truce assumed by the Basutos. A considerable quantity of sheep and oxen had been driven off by the Basutos, and although some portion of it had been recovered, the farmers in a large tract of country had been greatly impoverished. The result of this war was therefore looked forward to with much anxiety in the Cape Colony, where the merchants and tradesmen were very large creditors to the Boers. The procla- mation of his excellency the governor, forbidding British subjects from proceeding to the territories of the belligerents, or in any way engaging in the war, had not been received with much satisfaction on the border districts, where the colonists felt they were bound to go over and help their brethren the burghers of the free State, and it was stated that several volunteers had proceeded from the colony to join the conflict. In addition to the very serious com- mercial difficulties that it was considered anything like a defeat of the Boers would cause in the Cape colony, it was believed that such an event would also have a general effect upon the minds of the frontier Kaffirs very prejudicial to the interests of the colo- nists. Something like a coalition of the native tribes in a demonstration against the colony might be expected. The inroad of Molappo into the Rlip River country Natal already pointed to the difficulties there would be to maintain a neutrality. The Natal people were in, a ferment at the event, while it was said that the in- road was caused more immediately by hostilities on the part of farmers, who, although residing in the colony, had considered themselves as belonging to the free State. It was not known whether Moshesh had sanctioned this act of aggree sion. Three farmers were killed, a woman killed or carried off, and many thou- sand of pounds worth of stock destroyed or carried off. The general commanding, Sir Percy Douglas, being on spot at the time, orders were issued for every available man to march to Ladysoruth in support of the oivil power; and it was expected that the column would leave D'Urban on the 3rd of July. During the past month trade had been moderate in the colony, nevertheless business was doing on a legi- timate footing and sound basis. The war, it was ex- pected, would tell very seriously upon the future trade ,of the colony, especially of the Eastern Province, oc- curring as it did just as Port Elizabeth was passing through a monetary crisis. The Eastern Province Herald says the wool season had been late, and the unsound position of affairs there having become known throughout the country, a comparatively small amount of wool was offered on the- market. Failures continued to occur, and confidence, the very life and soul of business, was gone. An extraordinary check had been given to trade, and although the immediate result was unpleasant, yet it was hoped the balance would be by-and-by restored. Meanwhile merchants were doing nothing, and shopkeepers were do- ing little but looking at the goods on their shelves. Notaries and trustees in insolvent estates were the only persons who were busy. The Herald, in ac- counting for this state of affairs, says:—"Each day opens up more and more the fact that the trade of this colony has been grievously overdone. High prices at home for wool might have enabled shippers to put off the evil day, and thus tide over for a time the revelation of the losses that have befallen them- while at the same time they mitigated those losses— but the eventual result was not to be averted by any human agency. Losses amounting to insolvency had involved many wool shippers for years past, and one or more favourable seasons would not have restored the heavy balance which repeated losses had ab- stracted. It was merely a question of time when the announcement should be made, and it is to be feared that the delay of every season only made the ultimate loss more severely felt." A Singular Telegraphic Blunder.-One of the office-bearers of the Grand Lodge of Scotland who had to attend the ceremony of laying the foundation stone of the memorial to the Duke of Athole at Logie- rait, the other day, left Edinburgh without his cocked hat. On discovering the omission he telegraphed from a station on the Inverness and Perth line to his wife in Edinburgh, "Send my cocked hat with to- morrow." Oar readers may judge of his consternation when on the following day his friend put into his hand not the missing article of attire, but a parcel of "cooked ham," into which words it appeared the telegraph clerks had transformed the message!

"HE LONDON and RAMSGATE MURDERSJ…

GREAT BOAT.RACE BETWEEN KELLY,…

MR. TIDD PRATT AND THE GARIBALDI…

NORTH-EASTERN LONDON EXHIBITION…

SUPPOSED MURDER AT WINDSOR.

GENERAL LANGIEWICZ ON THE…