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SHOCKING DEATH IN A RAILWAY…

THE LOSS OF THE GLASGOW STEAMSHIP…

DREADFUL SUFFERINGS OF A SHIP'S…

SOifF LONDON PLAGUES OF FORMER…

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SOifF LONDON PLAGUES OF FORMER TiMES. Only six years after the outbreak of pestilence in 1563, we have accounts of another plague, which was so violent that it was necessary to adjourn the Michaelmas term to that of Hilary; and the Lord Mayor gave orders that all idle persons should be pre- vented from straying about, who might spread the disorder amongst the citizens. They also adopted some sanitary precautions, which were more likely to pre- vent the evil than the confinement of poor distressed wanderers. In 1603, another terrible outbreak of the plague occurred, which carried off in that year 30,578 persons, 3,090 of whom died in one week. If, for the purpose of roughly showing to modern London the extent of this mortality, we multiply the population of 1,603 by 10, thQ doatko in ono woaJc would be 30,900. Another attack of plague occurred, when great pre- parations had been made for the reception, in London, of Charles 1. On the death of James t., the Lord Mayor and aldermen repaired to Ludgate, where Charles I., having arrived on horseback, was there proclaimed, as well as at all other places in the City; but the joy was changed to mourning, for the plague raged so violently, both in the City and the suburbs, that it carried off 35,470 people, besides upwards of 18,000 who died of other distempers. On account of this calamity the coronation was postponed to the 2nd of February; this was in 1625. In 1635, the plague carried off 10,400 citizens, and in consequence of its occurrence, the fairs and* other large places of public assembly were stopped. There are many other accounts of pestilences of various kinds which have visited Old London; and amongst the records in the British Museum and Guildhall Library, there will be found many accounts of visitations which have not been especially noticed by the London historians; but there might be useful knowledge gained by an ex- amination of this most important subject—more in detail than has yet been done. In 1665, however, exactly 200 years ago, about the beginning of May, the greatest plague of which we have record in England broke out in London. It swept away 68,596 persons, which, added to the number of those who died from other disorders, raised the bills of mortality in that year to 97,306. Even at that time we do not think that the population of London was so much as one-eighth of the present. If, however, we take this estimate, the deaths in London from a similar plague now would number 558,768 (upwards of half a million human beings). From other disorders than the plague the death-rate was heavy; and the deaths in London, if we compare the past population with the present, would be in all 778,448.

THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.

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SUPPOSED MURDER AT WINDSOR.

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