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SHOCKING DEATH IN A RAILWAY…

THE LOSS OF THE GLASGOW STEAMSHIP…

DREADFUL SUFFERINGS OF A SHIP'S…

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DREADFUL SUFFERINGS OF A SHIP'S CREW. The following is an extract from the log of the ship Chariot of Fame, which rescued the survivors, six in aember, of the Sam Dunning: About four p.m. Sunday evening, the 24th April, passed a ship's topgallant mast not long in the water. About an hosar afterwards, our ship steering right be. fore the wind N.N.W., the man at the wheel informed the officer that he saw something like a boat about two miles off, on the port beam. Captain Clark came ON deck, and looking through his glass at the object pronounced it to be a raft with several persons on it, waving Bomekmdof a. sigBalof distress. Theshipwas then hauled to the wind, and when about half a mile from the raft a boat was lowered, which, in charge of the chief officer, went off to the rescue. On approaching, however, what was thought to be a raft, it turned out to be a part of a poop-deck, to which six men were clinging by means of a piece of rope made fast to two ring-bolts. They were in a most wretched condition, and nigh dead from hanger, thirst, and exposure to the elements, being drenched to the skin by the waves, which every moment dashed over their frail support. Their hands and feet were, inflamed and swollen to an enor- hiobs size with the action of the sun and salt water. They were got on board as soon as possible, and one of them, as soon as lifted over the rail, ejaculated, Thank God, you have saved our lives." and imme- diately fainted away. Everything that could be thought of to relieve them was done with all speed, and in a few ho«rs they had so far recovered as to be able to relate their own sad story. James Baines, one of the survivors, reports as follows: Left Rangoon on March 18, towed down the river by two atieamtugs came to inside the light. ship at 9,30 p,m. Hove up on the 19th; steamer towed us outside the lightship. Proceeded to sea with a fair wind and a small list to port, until reaching the line, when we get squally weather, variable winds, and &s far as 4 lat. at S. wind from W.N.W., then northing, and from that to west, breaking off to north. Con- tinued so until April 15, when a heavy cross swell arose from the S.E. to N.W., wind gradually increasing from that quarter until the evening of the 18th, when it increased to a hard gale. About ten p.m. it came upon us in a great hurricane, the ship labouring and pitching very heavily. People continually at the main and bilge pumps, but could not get them to bring water. Main- yard adrift on the deck, starting the timbers and bits. Wind still increasing. Hauled the foresail up at 8,30 to wear ship, but could not wear her. Hauled up on the starboard tack again. Meanwhile ship gradually sinking down, going over on her side more and more. Two a.m., Tuesday, April 19.-The mate called all hands aft on the poop, asking the captain what was to be done, for he did not think the ship would last the night out, and asked if he should out the masts away. The captain said, "No; she will hold on till daylight;" but the mate contradicting, the assent was given to cut away, which waa counetrmanded. After waiting about a quarter of an hour we could feel the ship set- tling down gradually. Orders were given to cut away the mast; and as the mizenmast went, so did the ship. I was on the weather side corner of the poop- house, close to the captain, who got over the side and caught hold of the main brace, a heavy sea break- ing over us, and deluging the decks fore and aft. I 1 She was then in the trough of the aea, and sinking, J while I hold on to the brace for a considerable time. I then let go, and coming to the surface swam about for two minutes, got hold of a small piece of wreck c about six feet long, got on it, and was buoyed up for about five minutes. I kept in this position, following "j to see if there was any one alive until I got an answer j from the poop deck wreck, on which were six or seven j men. I left my piece of the wreck plank and went off > bo them, the gale still violent. It abated about two p.m., while we were left swinging in the sea, sur- rounded by pieces of the wreck, chests, chairs, hatches, bulwarks, &o. Saw a ship steering towards us on Friday morning. The carpenter, boatswain, Dunning, Tremond, Hunt, and Scholfield are the only survivors of the ill-fated ship I Sam Dunning, which left Rangoon with a crew of thirty-one men all told.

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